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January 15, 1975 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-15

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday; January 15', 19751

Kiambly may close University Center -

(dontinued from Page 1)
has threatened patients with
severe punishment if they speak
with reporters about conditions
at the center.
While Kambly would not
comment further, he refused
to allow patients to speak with
a reporter last night.
ONE OF the Senate subcom-
mittee's findings - that Kam-

bly allegedly billed at least 16
patients for nonexistent thera-
.py sessions - became the topic
of a long argument between
K hslvc law ver and Assistant

fied before the subcommittee in
July "without any taint of sug-
gestion" that Kambly's prac-
tices were illegal.

t
t

State Prosecutor Mike Materna Thus, the lawyer argued, the
during the pre-trial hearing in state police seizure of Kam-
curtroom yester- bly's records last month was
dam illegal since it stemmed pure-
lv from what Chippens termed
Attorney James Crippens ar- the subcommittee's "civil"
gued that his client had testi- probe.

Trade treaty cancellation
threatens detente's status

(Continued from Page 1) I
en assurances on emigration,
Kissinger said.
In view of these develop-
ments, Kissinger said, Presi-
dent Ford has decided the 1972
trade agreement cannot be
brought into force and that he
would not grant the Soviet Un-
ion most-favored - nation tariff
status.
KISSINGER, who had prefer-
red quiet diplomacy in behalf
of Soviet Jews but lost ground
to congressional forces, avoid-
ed recriminations.
However, he emphasized thatF

he disagreed with some con- lion previously paid.
gressional tactics, although not PAYMENTS of $12 million in
with the objective of free emi- 1972 and $24 million in 1973
gration, and wanted to steer were made. Another $12 million
clear of public claims that the was due on July 1, with the
Soviets had given assurances balance of $686 million to be
of specific numbers of Jews paid out over an extended per-
who would be allowed to leave iod following the granting of
their country. most-favored-nation benefits.
The effect of the action is Left intact are all major pro-
to nullify all U. S. government visions of the new trade act en-
trade credits to the Soviet Un- abling the United States to be-
ion and the timetable for Soviet gin negotiations with more than
payments of an $11-billion World 100 nations for tariff reductions
War II debt. Under the 1972 in Geneva next month as well
accord, Moscow agreed to pay as a $25-billion lending author-
$722 million over the $199 mil- ity for the Export-Import Bank
for nations other than theSo-

BUT MATERNA pointed out
that the all the subcommittee's
investigations have "criminal
overtones," and Thomassen de-
nied Crippen's move to quash
the billing records evidence.
But the judge, who appeared
mildly irritated with Crippens'
repeated objections to Mater-
na's questions, adjourned the
examination until February 4
to give the defense time to pre-
pare a brief in response to new-
ly introduced billing records.
The new evidence appeared
as Michigan Blue Shield dis-
bursement manager Christa
Conver testified Kambly had
received government checks
through Blue Shield for therapy
sessions which never occurred.
BLUE SHIELD handles pay-
ments from the government's
Civilian Health and Medical
Program of the Uniformed
Services (CHAMPUS), the in-
surance unit which covers the
children of military personnel.
The University Center received
over $1 million from CRAM-
PUS for treatments of service-
men's children during the past
five years.
The University Center is pri-
vately owned by Kambly and
his wife, and has no connection
to the University.
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area).
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
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Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-

ATIO1rN EL 6IIT
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viet Union.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 87
Wednesday, January 15, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan News
phone 764-0562. Second clss postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i I y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann

AP Photo
Leaving services
President Ford, flanked by the Rev. Robert Lamar, moderator of the general assembly, United Presbyterian Church in
the United States, emerges from a special communion service that marked the opening of the House and Senate in Wash-
ington yesterday.
ALL ENTHUSIASTIC:
Auto execs hail Ford tax proposals
DETROIT (iP)-Top executives ' us out of our present difficul- BUT HIS call for an immedi- force is engaged in auto-relate
of the troubled auto industry ties," said the chairman of the ate federal income tax cut of work, the unemployment rat
are hailing President Ford's company that bears his name. $16 billion is seen in the Motor is 11.2 per cent. It is 12.4 in th
new economic program, espe- The President proposed the City as a possible incentive step metropolitan Detroit area.
cially his proposed five-year moratorium on emission stand- to help stimulate sagging auto "The well-being of million
moratorium on present auto the sales. of Americans is at stake here,'
emissions standards. tsion Monday night. He indicated T h e President's proposals Ford said, "and I hope that th
"T h e President's program it would enable American auto were made as 282,000 auto work- administration and the Congres
sounds good to me," Henry makers to achieve 40 per cent ers either went or remained on wiork the tocgt ar
Ford said yesterday. savings in gasoline consumption, layoff because of the decline in action." The Democrats are
For sad ysteday :currently 'offering their own
one of the administration's en- car sales. Twenty auto assem- economic and energy proposals
"IT IS AIMED at the main ergy conservation goals. bly plants and eight truck fac I Ford's counterpart at Genera
problem areas-recession, infla- The President's proposal falls toris are closeadthisa e iMotors Corp. also praised th
tion, energy and unemployment- short of the freeze on new production cutbacks aimed at President's proposals.
-and if it is put into effect safety standards the industry reducing record backlogs of un-'
promptly it should begin to pull has been seeking. soldvehices. " ewcomteresiden
onA hisOLA new eonomJ1ict rogra

~.

I

d
S
e
St
e
rn
al
e
t

UAC Contert Co-op
,resents
TOMORROW
NIGHT!
JOHN
PRINE
and his band

THURS., Jan. 16, POWER CENTER, 8 p.m.
Reserved seats $4.00. Avail. UM Union 11-5:30 daily
(763-4553), Ann Arbor Music Mart on State St.,
Recordland at Briarwood, and Huckleberry, Party Store
in Ypsi. Sorry, no personal checks. Smoke not in concert
hall, keep good music on campus.

11

*74 Atlantic Recording Corp.
*Awvson of Warner Communications tnec

- - - - - - - - - - - - - In all, January layoffs will
take their toll on 326,000 blue
collar auto workers, almost half
the industry's 685,000 -ourly
workers. Almost 180,000 face in. {
JCIRAVEL MICH. UNION 763-21 definite layoffs.
"TQN LAYOFFS in the auto indus-
1 try contributed heavily to the
nation's current 7.1 unemploy-
ment rate. In Michigan, where
DOM EST IC F LIGHTSnearly 2 per cent of the labor
SPECIAL FARES U-M Stylists }
SAVE 20% Styling or ReSlar
SPRING BREAK-DEADLINE JAN. 27 e e you
NEW YORK feel better
LOS ANGELES At the UNION
SAN FRANCISCO
ALL FLIGHTS ON SCHEDULEDRT
AMERICAN AIRLINES-NONSTOP JETS Rduced Ra
Billiards & Bowli
LIMITED SPACE BILLIARDS $1/HR.
For further details-contact Free Instructions
Pocket Billiards
Jan. 22
17* TDAVIELComina February 20
Pocket Billiards Exhibition
Open 1 1 a.m. Mon.-.

said Thomas Murphy, GM chair-
man. "It recognizes problems
and provides leadership to re-
kindle greatly needed consumer
confidence."
General Motors said govern-
ment-mandated equipment since
the autumn of 1971 has added
about $270 to the price of each
GM vehicle. During the same
period, the price of GM pro-
ducts has gone up an average
of $1,200.
"WE ARE particularly pleased
that the President favors a five-
year hold on the present level
of automobile emissions," Mur-
phy said.
"General Motors believes that
maintaining the current levels
will get the job done on air
quality while continuing im-
provements in fuel economy."
hrough Saturday
ng at the Union
BOWLING 40c
per game
Sign up now
Mixed Leagues
Sat., 1 p.m. Sundays

i

IT

IDR

SH

Program in Judiac and Gebraic Studies-Winter 1975
COURSE OFFERINGS:

The Prophet, Kahlil
Gibrar's beloved master'
piece, a work which has
inspired millions with its
profound and universal
philosophy of life is now
a brilliant recording.
Interpreted musically
by Arif Mardin and told
with stirring beauty by
Richard Harris, "The
Prophet" is a magnificent
album.
"The Prophet"a
musical interpretation
featuring Richard Harris
with music composed
by Arif Mardin is on
Atlantic Records
and tapes.
THE PROPHET
KA1L4MGIRAN
RKHARDHARRS
15' ~

BEGINNERS HEBREW: a multi-media
audiovisual approach to the teaching
of language.
INTERMEDIATE HEBREW
HEBREW SPEAKING CLUB
BASIC JUDAISM I: an introduction to
Judaism and Jewish life for those with
no Jewish background.
BASIC JUDAISM 11: for those who wish
to, explore the basic principles of the
Jewish religion.
AMERICAN JEWISH LITERATURE:
we will be reading and discussing in
depth three major American novels.
JUDAISM AND CHRISTIANITY: this
course will examine and compare
classical Jewish and Christian views.
MODERN JEWISH THOUGHT: Buber,
Heschel, Rosenzweig, existentialism
and the challenge of modernity.

A STUDY OF THE BIBLE: a study of
Biblical religion particularly as it
relates to previous religions that
surrounded it.
HASSIDISM: Jewish mysticism in its
mass revival of 18th and 19th Century
Eastern Europe, prayer and song, dancing
and swaying, ascent to the heights of
the "Ein Sof."
INTRODUCTION TO MIDRASH: we
will discuss Midrash views of the story
of the binding of Isaac, but also the
nature and structure of Midrash.
THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT: a
study of source materials: this course
will deal with the origins and develop-
ment of the Arab-Israeli conflict and
the emergence of the Palestinian
national movement and the PL.O.
THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN JUDAISM

I

I Uf~icorn A "'iI kLi o- ---A- II -- IA ~I .. m IcI

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