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March 20, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Thursday, March 20, 1975

THE MICHIUAN DAILY

U' TurS
It's a wordly affair
You say you can't get to Tokyo or Seattle or Montreal to see
the World's Fair? How about Ann Arbor? The U-M International
Center is bringing together cultures from all over the world at
Ann Arbor's World's Fair, March 21-23 at North Campus Com-
mon.
The World's Fair is an annual event, put on by the U-M
foreign students' associations. This year, over 13 countries are
participating, portraying "Life Around the World," the Fair's
theme, through dress, food and cultural displays.
For 15 years, the World's Fair has attempted to cross po-
litical barriers through cultural sharing. This year, for instance,
Indian students will show how the art of batiking is done. Greek
costumes and Filipino handicrafts will be displayed, and spec-
tators can see a Korean demonstration of Tad Kwon Do.
Slides and films will also help bring "Life Around the World"
to Ann Arbor. In addition, a variety show, featuring folk-dances,
songs and fashions will provide international entertainment.
Food, important to any culture, will also play an important
part in the World's Fair. An assortment of international dishes
will be provided, from Turkish coffee and desserts to Chinese
eggrolls.
The World's Fair will be held 6 p.m. to midnight tomorrow;
noon to midnight Saturday, March 22; and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday,
March 23. U-M buses provide free transportation to the Fair at
North Campus Commons, 2101 Bonisteel.
Tickets for the World's Fair are one dollar for adults, 75 cents
for children under 12, and 50 cents for the variety show. For
groups of 25 or more, one dollar covers general admission and
the variety show cost. Tickets can be bought at the door, or be-
fore the Fair at the International Center, behind the Michigan
Union.
MARY MILLER
* * *
Call in the reserves
Although few students realize it, the mysterious people behind
the reserve desk do more than they are given credit for. The
employes not only do such dull things as checking out books,
but they also get to collect fines, reshelve the books and listen
to complaints on how bad their system is run.
"We haven't gotten that many complaints this year except
when the book isn't there," according to Robin Roberts, a stu-
dent supervisor. People do complain when they have to get new
identification cards though, but this is because a cracked card
breaks one of the brushes in the IBM machine and there are
ten brushes in each machine.
The employes have some gripes themselves and if the stu-
dents would follow the rules, they could end these complaints.
Rick Wisz, a third year employe behind the desk states that
"people copy numbers down incorrectly," letting the student look
for the wrong book. Deborah Sears say that "basically the stu-
dents are pretty nice," but adds it would help if they would
"print more clearly."
Suggestions to help yourself and the employes save time when
you want to check out a book are first of all, read all the signs.
Secondly, if people want to avoid long waits, don't come right
on the hour.
*n *.WENDY STALO
Mobility mania
The majority of American men move to a new home at least
once during their adult lifetime, according to a professor in the
University Dept. of Social Work.
Since 1971, Dr. John Tropman has been conducting research
on the effects of geographic and occupational mobility on the
American male. Using data compiled from a national sample
taken in 1962, Tropman has attempted to define the relationship
between mobility and such factors as mental health, marital
status, and occupational achievement, in order to find out
whether moving about the country has a positive or negative
affect on the individual.
"My interest with regard to social work has to do with to
what extent geographical mobility affects needs for certain social
services such as marriage counseling," says Tropman. "For
instance, we know from our research that a greater proportion
of 'mobile' American males are hospitalized for mental illness
than of those who don't move around. This is also true in terms
of divorce and remarriage," he added.
However, Tropman has also found that some qualities of
family life are improved by moving around. "Mutual help is both
expected and given, and the quality of the (family) relationship
flourishes with less frequent contact," he claims.
Some of the most important results of Tropman's research
concern race. "Here's what's fascinating-black men can't seem
to escape their racial status, whether they're moving or not. The
black movers make only half as much money as white non-
movers, and in general their occupational achievement is about
half that of whites," said Tropman.
Tropman has also been interested in the effects of mobility

upon social status. "In the main, we see movement as being good,
but there's a sub-value in people that equates men moving around
with fear-the fear of the drifter, the bum.
"Another offshoot from my research has been that of values.
Americans tend to view movement up the social and financial
ladder on the "outside" as tantamount to movement up Jacob's
ladder on the inside," he added. "But both of these topics are un-
substantiated and necessitate a great deal more research."
TOM PRESTON
Prof. Michael Meyer
Professor of Jewish History
H.U.C.-J.I.R.: Cincinnati
Lectures Thursday, March 20
"WHEN DOES THE MODERN PERIOD IN
JEWISH HISTORY BEGIN?"
4 P.M. at MLB, LECTURE RM. 1
Sponsored by the Dept. of History Proqram on Judaic Studies
8 P.M. at HILLEL, 1429 Hill St.
"THE HUNDRED YEAR REVOLUTION:
REFORM JUDAISM AT THE CROSSROADS"

Special
auto
benefits
may end
DETROIT (P) - Special un-
employment benefit funds at
Chrysler and General Motors
are expected to run dry this
spring. leaving more than 130,-
000 laid off auto workers in
bleak financial straits.
Chrysler's fund could be ex-
hausted by the first week of
April and GM's could run out
by mid-May due to massive, un-
precedented industry layoffs, ac-
cording to United Auto Workers
(UAW) union projections.
THE Supplemental Unemploy-
ment Benefit (SUB) funds, a
unique cushion designed to see
auto workers through temporary
layoff periods, weresnot de-
signed to cope with recession-
level furloughs.
Laid off assemblers who now
collect an average $170 a week
in SUB pay and nemployment
compensation, will lose an av-
erage $90 a week when the funds
run out, leaving them and their
families with $30 a week in-
come.
In some states, where unem-
nlovment compensation is high,
flrloughed workers stand to lose
less than half their .current pay.
Tn Michigan. for example, max-
ium unemploymenthcomen sa-
tion is $106. among the blehest
in the nation. A worker there
may only lose $64 in SUB pay.
BUT !N states where jobless
benefits are low, exhaustion of
SUB pay can be devastating.
Unemnloyment pay in Indiana
and Mississippi is no more than
0 a week, lowest in the na-
tion. There, laid off auto work-
er5 could lose $110 a week in
SUB benefits.
"It can be a real nightmare
for those peonle," said an offic-
ial at the UAW, which has been
tnrshing frantically for vast im-
nrnvements in state unemnlov-
ment benefits to meet their
members' needs.
Chrysler's SUB picture is the
bleakest of the four major auto-
makers, union officials say

Page Three
COME TO THE
GRAND OPENING
OF
**
* featuring the finest in contemporary
cinema, theatre, and community pro-
grams.
OPEN HOUSE
THURS.-SAT., MARCH 20-22
*~ **
Refreshments, Entertainment
* EVERYONE WELCOME!
+*
605 E. WILLIAM
'> r"w:r" Stiff
original works of graphic art-etchings, lithographs,-
by leading 20th century artists
Pablo Picasso Johnny Friedlaender Marc Chagall
Salvador Dali, Alexander Calder Joan Miro
Georges Rouault Victor Vasarelv and others.

AP Photo
Dogged down
Odd Bull, an 80-pound bulldog from Tuscaloosa, Ala. proves once again that you can't es-
cape Uncle Sam as he joins the ranks of his human counterparts, mulling over the all too
familiar 1040A tax form.
VALUE QUESTIONED:
CIA raises Soviet sub

WASHINGTON (01) - An at-}
tempt by the Central Intelli-
gence Agency to raise a Soviet
submarine intact from the
depths of the Pacific Ocean was
well worth the risk of public dis-
closure, several congressional
leaders and a senior naval of-
ficver said 'yesterday.
Others, however, expressed
strong doubts that the potential
gain of intelligence about Soviet
submarines was worth the esti-
mated $350 million spent on the
project.
"IF THE CIA can spend $350
million with which to pay How-
ard Hughes to raise obsolete 18-
year-old submarines, then I
think ths agency needs a cost-
benefit ratio," Sen. Frank
Church (D-Idaho) said. "No
wonder we're going broke."
Published accounts estimated
the total cost of the operation
at between $250 and $350 million.
The "submarine was raised to
the surface last summer- by a.
salvage vessel unit built espe-
cially for the project by Hughes,I
the recluse billionaire.
Although salvaging a sunken
craft in international waters is
not illegal, the operation has
caused a furor in Washington
due to the diplomatic implica-
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 134
Thursday, March 20, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);1
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio) ; $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).
day through Saturday morning.
LOOK FOR
THIS SYMBOL
it could be your opportunity
to be part of the most exciting
assemblage of people in history

tions.
A FULL DAY after published
reports of the operation appear-
ed, there was no public reactionj
from the Soviet Union. Ameri-
can diplomatic sources in Wash-
ington said a serious break in
detente with the Soviet Uniont
was considered unlikely.
The diesel-powered G-Class
Russian submarine was located
by the U. S. Navy in 1968 after
it went down. Seventy Russian
officers and seamen were lost
following a series of explosions
on board the vessel, which sank
to a depth of about 17,000 feet,
750 miles northwest of Oahu, Ha-
wail.
Adm. Hyman Rickover said
yesterday useful information
could be gleaned from recovery
of Soviet submarine remains
even if the sub was an older
model whose technology had

been overtaken by later ad-
vances.k
"You can get some idea of
how they the Russians develop-
ed their submarines and their
missiles," Rickover said in a
brief interview. "You can see
how they do things."
BUT Rickover, the Navy's top
expert on nuclear propulsion
and nuclear submarines, said,
"I have had obsolutely nothing
to do with" the reported recov-
ery by the Central Intelligence
Agency of part of a Soviet mis-
sile-firing submarine from deep
in the Pacific last summer.
The Defense Department re-
fused to discuss the report or its
implications in any way.
There were indications that
the CIA operation was a tightly
held secret known to very few
military or civilian officials in
the Pentagon.

I

ro

I

NOTICE
Non-Native
Speakers of English
All speakers of English as a second language
are invited to take part in an Experimental
Test of English Language Proficiency to be
given at RACKHAM LECTURE HALL AT 7:00
P.M. ON THE 20TH OF MARCH. You will
receive $5.00 for approimatelyx 1-1 V/ hours
of your time. If interested you must call and
register at the following number: 764-2416.
*No ELI Student Currently Enrolled in the Intensive
English Courses Are Eliqible for the Test at This Time.

I

EARN $100/MONTH
STIPEND
CALL
ARMY ROTC
764-2401
Women in the
Rabbinate
MYRA SOIFER
Student at HUC-JI R
Friday, March 21
8:30 p.m.
at HILLEL-
1429 Hill St.

E

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1' SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 1975-5:00 P.M.
} MarklevDining Room Males $1.50

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