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March 13, 1975 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, March 13,"'197'5

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

UCLA
0
in rec
By ANDY GLAZER
UCLA's basketball success has
caused Coach John Wooden's
troops to be called a lot of
things: The University of Cali-
fornia at Lew Alcindor; a dyn-
asty; the Walton Gang; and a
lot of obsenities.
Mostly, they've been called ex-
cellent.,
Ten times in the past 12 years
the UCLA Bruins have been the
NCAA's championship t e a m.
Three times during that
s p a n Michigan basketball
teams have faced the Bruins.
The Maize and Blue posted
impressive records in all three
seasons, but each time came
away with little but frustra-
tion from the Bruins.
The first of the three was in
1963, the first year of UCLA's
championship string. Michigan,
with sophomore Cazzie Russell
leading the way, won 23 games
and lost five that year. But
UCLA prevailed in the Christ-
mas meeting, 98-80.
The next time the two teams
meet the game was the high-
light of the basketball season:
it was the 1964-65 NCAA title
game.
The Wolverines had been
tpp-ranked going into that
b a t t I e, with All-Americans

toppled

Blue

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meetings

AP Photo

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Irritable UCLA I fa

Russell and Bill Buntin pto-
viding much of the punch. But
UCLA had a little firepower
of its own in Gail Goodrich
and Keith Erikson.
42 points from Goodrich hater,
UCLA had a 91-80 win and the
NCAA title. .
The two teams didn't meetj
again until last year's Bruin{
Classic in Los Angeles. Mich-
igan's prospects going into that
game didn't look very promis-
ing: UCLA had an edge from
virtually every angle.
Firstly, this was the Walton
Gang. At game time, Bill Wal-
ton, Keith Wilkes and Co. had
lost exactly one game in three
and one half years of intercol-
legiate competition.
After an undefeated fresh-
man campaign,'Walton's class
won two national champion-
ships without losing a game.
Finally, Notre Dame scored
the last 12 points of an epic
battle in South Bend to end
UCLA's unprecedented 88
game winning streak.
The day after that game,I
Notre Dame c o a c h Digger
Phelps virtually conceded the
rematch scheduled for the week
after at UCLA. Phelps said that
he "couldn't expect too much."
He was right. UCLA broke
the game open early and was
never seriously threatened.
At that point the Bruins hadn't
lost at home in four years.
Michigan, then would have to
face a truly great team iH the
finals of its own tournament,
right in Pauley Pavillion, where
the Bruins showed the Irish
what playing at home means.
Thus did they meet the tidal
wave.
Michigan started out well,
jumping to a 14-8 lead. But
Wayman Britt quickly got into
foul trouble, and when he
departed for Chuck Rogers,
the roof fell in.
The Bruins had needed 12
minutes to get their first 20
points. They needed but six to
get their next 20. Britt returned,
but the damage was done.
UCLA led 42-32 at the half.
Michigan stayed w i t h the
Bruins during the first seven
minutes of the second half. Britt
then fouled out, UCLA scored 12
in a row and the fans could
shout their intimidating
U ... C . . L.. A, U-C-L-A,

RA! with smiles instead of wor-
ried expressions.
UCLA wound up a comfort-
able 90-70 winner.
Now Michigan will face
UCLA in the first round of the
NCAA Western playoffs. The
two teams are the same as
last year with three very ma-
jor differences. The Bruins
are w i t h o u t Walton and
Wilkes, Michigan w i t h o u t
Campanella Russell.
The subtractions would seem
to favor Michigan. As great as
Russell was, his talents were
only roughly equal to or slightly
better than Wilkes'. He was cer-
tainly no Bill Walton.
The question, then, is whether
the subtractions are enough of
an addition to Michigan's side.
There will be one other dif-
ference. This time the game will
be played in Pullman, Wash.
The Bruins may find themselves
with a neutral court disadvant-
age, much less a home court:
advantage. UCLA is not the
best-liked team in the Pacific
northwest.j
Beating UCLA will be a tall'
order, though. The Wolverines
have to hope that this will be
one time that history chooses
not to repeat itself.

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NCAA'S BEGIN TODAY:
Blue grapplers

Starts This Friday

in

final test

By RAY O'HARA
The Michigan wrestlers, fresh
from a frankly disappointing
fourth place finish in the Big
Ten tournament, advance today
into the annual three-day hurly-
burly of the NCAA tourney.
Five of Michigan's ten Big
Ten entries finished among the
top four grapplers in their re-1
specti-e weight classes, and
there. qualified for the trip to
Princeton, New Jersey.
AS A TEAM, the WolverinesI
are a very long shot at best to
cop the NCAA title. Such an'
occurence would presuppose the
timely demise of four of the
nation's best teams as well as a
near-perfect effort from the
Maize and Blue.

managed to choke in the nation-
al tournament before, the
chances that all four of them
will encounter that ignominy
are exceedingly remote.
Nevertheless, Michigan men-
tor Bill Johannesen thinks he
sees an opening. "Last year we
sent seven guys to the tourna-
ment and two of them lost in
the first round," he said, "but
we still managed to finish sec-:
ond in the team standings."
Any such heroic Michigan
charge this year would almost
certainly be led by senior 118
pounder Jim Brown.
BROWN, the Big Ten cham-
pion at the lightest weight, has
encountered nothing but frustra-
tion in two previous campaigns

claimed Johnson, adding, "It
all boils down to how bad you
want it and how prepared you
are."
Two of Michigan's other title
threats are Brad McCrory (134)
and Mark Johnson (167).
McCrory has steadily improv-
ed all season long, and now, as
the second place wrestler at
his weight in the conference,
he must be considered a legiti-
mate candidate to win the
NCAA championship. McCrory,
according to his coach, was
hampered in the Big Tens by
a reluctance to take chances.
"Brad can win the national
championship," asserted Billy
Joe, "but if he wrestles con-
servatively he won't make it."

ties.
Brink has wrestled capably
and consistently throughout the
season. Seldom sparkling, Brink
would seem to be a long shot
for the title, but some other
high finish is not out of the
question for him.
Mitch Marsicano has been
erratic. During the season he
managed to lose more than one
match that he should have won.
Still, he brought home a third
place finish in the Big Ten, and
his mental attitude, the object
of his coaches' ire before the
tournament, is said to be vastly
improved. He could finish al-
most anywhere in the field. i

Inl

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museum
Dearborn, Michigan

Iowa, Iowa State,I
and Oklahoma State
send no less than eig
lers to the champion
though plenty of tea
Track
fourth
"'We were flat,"
bluntly.
And what better w
it? The track team
spring break with hig
back tied for fourth p
Wisconsin.
Indiana, led by
won the indoor cham
followed by Illinois
western and Michig
igon State, 10; Ohio
"The field event
(Jeff) McLeod's inju
relay."
Michigan came in
mile relay, but woun
team will be in the N
this weekend at Cob
muscle will definitely
Michigan's bright
had the only Wolverin
with a 1:09.3 clocking
"Dave ran a g
going to be in at le
The Wolverines g
and Bill Donakowski
in the three mile, be]
son of Wisconsin. The
Football star Rob
with a 6.2 time. Jim
ran in a faster heat
"For the most, th

Oklahoma for the national title, but is Mark Johnson is wrestling at SCORES
will each determined to come home with 167 pounds, although he went
ght wrest- the coveted prize. to the mat all season with 177
ships. Al- "Brown most definitely has a and 190 pounders. His disap- Exhibition Baseball
ams have shot at winning the NCAA's," pointing fourth ' place finish at Detroit 6, Boston 2
167 in the Big Ten tournament Houston 12, Cincinnati 11
Los Angeles 9, Baltimore 7
* can be readily attributed to the Atlanta 2, Texas i
fluenza he contracted the pre- Ptsburgh 6, St. Louis-A I
team ties for viois week. Minnesota 8, Chicago-B1
RECOVERED now, sopho- as City 8, a
more Johnson is quite capable NBA
i oeren ee of overpowering a large part Boston 88, Phoenix 82
1 ej of the 167 pound field in his first Philadelphia 91, Portland 88
NCAA appearance. Washington 117, Houston 88
NHL
Wolverines Dan Brink (158) 1ontreaI 3, Toronto 3
By TOM CAMERON and Mitch Marsicano (HWT) St. Louis 4, Chicago 3
said Michigan track coach Jack Harvey are essentially unknown quanti- Atlanta 9, Minnesota 4
iay could the first year head coach explain -
went to the Big Ten Championships over
h hopes of a third place finish, but came
place, 18 points behind third place finisher
Mike McFarland's two record-tying runs, W CBN-FM
ipionship with 66 team points. They were
with 47 points, Wisconsin with 39, North-
an with 21; Iowa, 19; Purdue, 19; Mich-
State, 10; and Minnesota, 7.s is bac
s were weak," continued Harvey, "and
ry really hurt our chances in the mile
ito the meet with the fastest time in the
d up taking a third place. The mile relay/W
CAA National Indoor Track Championships
C Hall, but MLeod's pulled hamstring
hurt their chances again.
spot of the day was Dave Williams, who
e victory. Williams won the 300-yard dash,
and ran on the mile relay team.
Great race," Harvey commented. "He's
ast the top four in the NCAA's." TUneUSin
,ot some miore points from Mike McGuireT n e ui !
who took second and third respectivelyj
hind a record-breaking run by Mark John- -
ir times qualiifed them for the NCAA. -
Lytle took fifth place in the 60-yard dash ----------

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'I

Howe ran a 6.1 in the preliminaries, but
and did not qualify for the finals.
e field events were disappointing," Harvey1

said. "Except for Abe Butler-
and Doug Gibbs, no one did as;
well as they should have."
Butler and Gibbs rounded out
the Wolverine scoring. Butler
placed third in the triple jump
with a 49.9" measurement and!
Gibbs placed fifth in the high
jump with a 6-10 leap. Neither,
however, qualified for the'
NCAA's.

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