100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 13, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 13, 1975

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, March 13, 1975

WILD WEFT
YARNS
For weaving, knitting,
crocheting, macrame
415 North Fifth Ave., Kerrytown 11
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
31 3-761 -2466
Undergraduate Political Science
Assoc. General Meeting
"POLITICAL SCIENCE
AND
CAREER PLANNING"
THURSDAY, MARCH 13
7:30 P.M.
407 MASON HALL
can dier

IKupe c,
By AL HRAPSKY accomplish
It's been a long, long road for Wilmores
co-captains C. J. Kupec and achieved.
Joe Johnson-one that has seen Overcomi
a lot of twists, turns and ing scorer
changes. And even though the panella Rt
two seniors may never know Clevelandt
great riches or wealth, they ing with a
have proven that Horatio Al- that forced
ger's isn't the only authentic periment w
success story around. tactics and
After all, how many athletes up, the W
can boast of playing in the impressive.
NCAA tournament two years in Joe John
a row, and finishing first and from Detr
second in a conference with maturing p
Purdue, Indiana and Minnesota? undergonet
All this, despite playing second "Of cour
fiddle to a nationally ranked was the big
football team year after year, said. "I thi
and seldom filling a 13,609 ca-
pacity arena.
"Joe and I have been
through a lot in our four
years here," the 6'8" Kupec
said. "We've seen the low
points as well as some of the
great highlights.But most of
all, I've learned that if there's
mutual respect between al the
players, it makes winning a >
lot easier."
And that's the story of this
year's cager quintet: sophostica-
tion, dedication and unexpected

SENIORS LOOK BACK

.Johnson

finish

ccareers

ment-something the
and Bradys never
ing the loss of lead-
and rebounder Cam-
ussell to the NBA
Cavaliers, and play-
height disadvantage
d Johnny Orr to ex-
'ith zones, slow down
a three guard line-
olverines have been
son, the 5'11" guard
oit, summed up the
rocess Michigan has
this year.
se the forward spot
g question," Johnson
ink that John Robin-

athletes since the Elliott broth-
ers (Bump and Pete) to com-
pete on a championship basket-
ball and football team at Michi-
gan, reflected on the team's
confidence.
"I can't take anything away
from Campy," said C. J., "but
without him everyone counted us
out because they didn't think
we could pick up the slack. We
didn't expect anyone to fill his
shoes, but we knew we could
win. We just said to ourselves
-'hey listen, we're not getting
any credit. We don't have
Campy but we're going to go
out there and win anyway'."
By now, the Wolverines
surely have their critics at
bay, finishing strongly in the
Big Ten by winning seven of
their last eight games to earn
a berth in the NCAA Western
Regional.
But early in the season,
there were few who even gave
Michigan a prayer, let alone
a chance, of finishing with a
19-7 season record.
"We were optimistic early in
the Big Ten season," "Little
Joe" offered. "A lot of teams
had beaten us, but we still had
a chance to play them again.
We hadn't put it all together at
that point, but we were still
confident we'd get an NCAA
bid."
Later, rumors that the NCAA
might take the runnerup in the
Big Ten, instilled more confi-
dence in theteam, as Kupec
mentioned. But the realization
that no single player could do
it alone was paramount to
Michigan's success.
"Last year I was a factor,
but Campy was the major
factor," Joe said. "Now we
view each other as having
about the same ability and we
understand our roles. This
year our roles are more clear-
ly defined."
Kupec agreed, saying, "It's
like a piece of pie divided
equally; everyone knows they
have to play hard to win.

sample our imported soaps
made with the highest
quality natural ingredients
209 s. state
(downstairs)

mon.-sat.
10-6

C. J. Kupec
"At first, everyone was feel-
ing their way trying to assume
the scoring role that Campy
vacated," Kupec continued.
"But we found that no one
really had to be the big scorer
because everyone contributed."
Although the Maize and Blue's
accomplishments are largely
due to a team effort, Kupec and
Johnson have added the most
essential ingredients-leadership
and stability. Looking back over
the last 13 games, Kupec and
Johnson have taken turns as
high scorer in 11 of those con-
tests.
But that's really not surpris-
ing since Kupec finished as the
Wolverines' leading scorer with
a 17.7 average-third in the Big
Ten with a 19.1 average-and
Johnson runnerup,rhitting at a
14.2 clip. Both were selected to
the UPI second All-Big Ten
team.

Since Russell defected to
the pros, however, the co-
captains have had to modify
their roles.
"I don't want to make excuses
for my rebounding," said Kupec,
"but last year with Campy tak-
ing 20 shots per game, my main
job was to stay around the
boards. This year I'm shooting
more and assuming a lot of the
scoring load, so naturally I'm
playing away from the basket."
"But I think I've improved
my shooting and ballhandling
by playing further away from
the basket," Kupec added.
On the other hand, "Little
Joe" sees his role as a stabiliz-
ing agent among the often er-
ratic Wolverines.
"We don't have that one man
to take the big shot all the
time," said Johnson. "Some-
times I made the basket and
sometimes someone else came
up with it. I've just tried to be
consistent by hitting double fig-
ures, playing tough defense and
staying out of foul trouble."
Johnson, who admitted that
he wasn't heavily recruited by
Michigan, said that his main
ambition was to become a-
complete ballplayer. It's dif-
ficult to argue with the senior
playmaker when he asserts,
"My sophomore year I had a
lot of assists, and last year I
concentrated on defense. But
this year I've put it all to-
gether."
With the Wolverines' show-
down against UCLA Saturday
night and a possible NCAA re-
gional championship in the fu-
ture, Michigan fans are about

to witness the exodus of two-
thirds of one of Johnny Orr's
finest crops of recruits of recent
memory-the other third being
Campy Russell.
"Because of the last two
years," Kupec remarked,
"people have greater regard
for the team than before, and
it's starting to look like we
won't have to play backseat to
the football team anymore. It's
disappointing when you can't fill
Crisler arena when you know
you should.
"At the Minnesota game there
were only 8,000 people but they
were so loud and so involved
in the game," C. J. continued,
"I was astonished and I'm sure
it helped destroy Minnesota in
the end Hopefully now we'll get
more people to support the pro-
gram."
Johnson echoed similar sen-
timents in looking back at his
rapidly ebbing collegiate ca-
reer.
"I came to Michigan when the
teams were below .500 (wins)
and the program was shakey, so
reestablishing a winning tradi-
tion in basketball is my greatest
accomplishment. A champion-
ship team takes special ingredi-
ents and I'm fortunate that I
was a part of it."
Although both Johnson and
Kupec express concern about
finishing their undergraduate
degrees in education and eco-
nomics respectively, Johnson
summed it up perfectly:
"This is a long time to spend
anywhere and not accomplish
what you set out to do."

i
i

FRUSTRATED BY

-__
,.1
r !
i
{

UNIVERSITY POLICIES?
You CAN do something about it
on University Committees

E I

University of
California,
Santa Cruz
Summer
Language
Ins ttute
Offers intensive eight-week
Programs in

THERE ARE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS ON
THE FOLLOWING COMMITTEES:
" Student Relations
" Committee on Communications
" Teacher Awards
" Steering Committee (Budgeting)j
" Student Organizations Board
" University Council
-ALSO-I
" Academic Planning Analysis Committee
INTERVIEWS for all these committees will be held next
TUES. and WED. (March 18 and 19). Stop by the SGC
OFFICES, third floor of the Union, to sign up for an inter-
view and pick up an application form. Additional informa-
tion is available.

Joe Johnson
son's (Russell's successor) im-
provement has mirrored the
team's success.
"It's really amazing what
we've accomplished this year
with the personnel we have,"
Johnson continued. "I mean we
have a 6-2 guard playing for-
ward (Wayman Britt)-that's a
hard adjustment!"
Kupec, a native of Oak Lawn,
Illinois, and one of the first

3-6 FLORIDA FINISH:

Beginning and
Intermediate
Beginning

FRENCH
GERMAN

Baseball team returns

Beginning, Intermediate
and Advanced RUSSIAN
Beginning and
Intermediate SPANISH
June 23-August 15, 1975
(eight weeks)
Up to 15 quarter units
University credit
Tuition $364
Deadline May 16
Telephone: (408) 429-2952
For information about this
program write to:
George M. Benigsen,
Coordinator
Summer Language Institute
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

!I

218 N. DIVISION 665-0606
C. G. Jung
a day-long workshop with FILMS, DISCUS-
SION, and THOUGHTS on some basic teach-
ings of Jung.
Saturday, March 15th
10:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.
LUNCH PROVIDED

Let's give

By ED LANGE
The Michigan baseball team
completed its spring jaunt to
the sunny south with an unim-
pressive 3-6 ledger, but fear
not, things are not as bad as
they sound.
"I think the ball club did
well," said head coach Moby
Benedict. "We were in every
ball game but one (against
South Florida, 17-5).
"WINNING is important,"
continued Benedict, "but we go
down there to get in shape and
find out who can do it and who
can't. I like to find out who
the 'gamers' are."
The major surprise of the
trip, which i n c I u d e d games
Billiards & Bowling
Pibll & Foosball
OPEN
1 o.m. today
Michigan Union

against Stetson, South Florida,
Rollins College, St. Leo, Florida
Southern and a team of Detroit
Tiger farmhands, had to be the
lackluster Blue hurlers.
Michigan has had an excellent
corp of moundsmen in recent
years, and this vear's crop is
supposed to be on, of the best,
with no less than slx returning
veterans, headed by Chuck Rog-
ers, Craig Forhan, Tom Joyce,
and Larry Sorenson.
Benedict was understandably
puzzled by the pitching perform-
ances, which he thought would
be the strong point of the-
junket.
"As a general rule, it dis-
appointed me," stated the Mich-
igan mentor. "A couple of the
young ones, Bill Stennett and
Craig McGinnis, did a good
job," said Benedict, "and Mark
Weber also did a nice job."
Chuck Rogers, last year's ace
hurler (5-0, 1.59 ERA), pitched
well at times but was not the
force he was expected to be.
MICHIGAN'S main lineup in
Florida consisted of Mark Gren-

koski (LF), Dan Damiani (CF),
and Pete Ross (RF) in the out-
field and Randy Hackney, Dick
Walterhouse (2b), Jim Berra
(ss) and Jeff James (3b) with
Ted Mahan behind the plate.
The Wolverines did a com-
plete turnabout from last year,
when sporadic hitting sealed
their doom. The Blue batsmen
banged the ball at a .267 clip,
and that brought a spurt of op-
timism to Benedict.
Senior first baseman Hackney
and left-fielder Grenkoski led
the Wolverine attack. Hackney
cracked out 3 doubles and 3
homeruns and drove in 11 runs
while batting .367. His most im-
pressive statistic, however, had
to be his slugging percentage,
which was an awesome .767.
GRENKOSKI led the club in
hitting as he swang away at a
torrid .421 clip. F r e s h m a n
catcher-designated hitter Bob
Waslewski was also impressive,
according to Benedict.
The Wolverines open up their
regular season April 3 with a
twin bill against the University
of Detroit.

~P.
Wevegotit
inthebag.a
We've also got North Africa and the Near East.
Camping trips at camping prices, 3 to 9 weeks.
You'll have so much fun on our camping trips that you. may
not want to sleep. But in case you do, bring a sleeping bag.
We provide the rest.
You travel in a bus equipped with camping gear, a stereo
tape deck and guide who knows where the sights are.
You're as likely to camp on the grounds of a chateau as on
the seaside among olive trees. The campsites have hot and
cold running everything, shops, restaurants and even discos.
T You won't have trouble finding a dancing partner either.
There'll be 18 to 35 people in your group. And they're all
under 30.
We have 8 different Continental Coach Tours covering
everywhere from Casablanca and Amsterdam to Leningrad
and Istanbul.
Here is one of our most popular: Europa, 3 weeks, $321
plus airfare. Belgium, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, Aus-
tria, Italy and France. Departure dates: April 22; May 16;
June 10; July 4, 29; August 22; September 16.
So if you want to see the world at camping prices, put the
coupon in an envelope and relax. It's in the bag.
These prices are subject to a number of conditions (as well
as government approval). For all the details you must read
our "Continental Coach Tours" brochure. Fill out the coupon
and we'll send it to you. Or call your Travel Agent or British
Airways.
- " British Airways, Box 1525, Dept. 192-1703
' e N.Y., N.Y. 10019, Tel. (212) 687-1600
" Please send me your'"Continental Coach Tours"brochure. "
ame
Address
City State Zip
S My Travel Agent is

.

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan