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March 13, 1975 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-13

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Thursday, Mdreh 13, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, March 13, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

'U' Turns

Phnom Penh: Is

there a future? Prtuguese military

/ V 1iI

Ye olde dictionary
Behold there is life in those words. Yes the art of lexicog-'
raphy is alive and well on the fifth floor of Angell Hall. It is
there, since 1930 that the University of Michigan has been in
charge of accumulating the skill, resources and research tech-
niques necessary for compiling, editing and publishing the most
extensive Middle English Dictionary in the world.
The purpose of this unique undertaking is to succintly pre-
ent the Middle English vocabulary, fully documented, from the
viewpoint of the period between the 12th and 16th centuries.
Now, 45 years since its 1930 beginning 13 letters of the alpha-'
bet have been completed. The project team of nine members
working under the auspices of Prof. Sherman Kuhn, are now
more than half finished. Kuhn says "the task of writing a diction-
ary is a hard and sometimes tedious endeavor."
The entries vary considerably in length from a few lines for
a rare word, to 25 pages for the word maken, which means to
make. Many of the words in Middle English are not defined
as you would expect in contemporary English. For example
the word algebra hardly concerns mathematics, but is defined as
"a surgical treatment for fractures and dislocation." The mod-
ern meaning of algebra didn't occur until 1551.
When finished some years from now, The Middle English
Dictionary will contain in excess of 10,000 double column pages.
It will be so thorough and accurate that it will never have to
be done again. Henceforth it will be the primary source of Mid-
dle English in the World, says Kuhn.
-LARRY GARON
It's no Rembrandt but ...
You may have been exposed to culture without knowing it.
Thanks to the University Museum of Art's Allocation Pro-
gram, more than 200 pieces are presently cropping up all over
campus in departmental offices for public display.
The program, going strong now for several years, lends
prints for one year spans to such University offices on main
campus where they are likely to be seen by many people and
where someone is always on hand to see to their safety. Dorm-
itory displays, for obvious security reasons, are out.
Although the pieces are insured by the University, all fall
under the "low value range" - under $200, according to museum
registrar Jackie Slee,
So far, the prints have escaped the yen of art thieves and
the spray guns of graffiists - The Museum receives no compen-
sation for its program.
The art, mostly 20th century, black and white prints are
by the scarcer knowns in the art world. "If they expect to see
Rembrandt, they'll be disappointed," admits Slee.
There is a long waiting list for the allocations and the mu-
seum staff is not without its hassles. "People call and are im-
mediately under the assumption that we owe them art," ex-
plains Slee. "They can't understand why we don't loan them
anything."
President Fleming's residence is the only private home
benefiting from the service. His current repertoire, aside from
two prints, include three oils, two gouaches (poster paints) and
one watercolor. After all, he is the president of the University,
and Slee notes an added factor in his favor, "He's right next
door to the museum."
Now how's that for security?
-JAY LEVIN

PHNOM PENH Cambodia ()
- "The Americans will never
let Cambodia fall," says a pret-
ty young woman in Western
dress.
"The Khmer Rouge cannot
win, says an army captain,
sipping coffee in a restaurant.
Few of Phnom Penh's two
million residents and refugees
seem to be thinking about the
end, though their world has
been compressed into a 215-
square-mile enclave, beleagu-
ered on every side and shrink-
ing.
THE PROBLEMS of the pre-
sent - finding food, staying
clear of rockets - are too
pressing for most people to fret
about the future. The pace here
is still pedicab speed as the hot
season nears its peak. Red bou-
gainvilleas celebrate the lack
of rain. Gentle white cows
browse the broad centers of;
French-laid boulevards.{
The Americans alone show
much sense of urgency. The:
food and ammunition receiving
teams put in long, sweaty days
overseeing the airborne life-
line, and the embassy strains
to put over its viewpoint that
U-M Sty lists
Open 8:30 a.m.
Mon.-Sat.
-M Union

more military aid is both nec -to
essary and desirable.
"I know nothing about this
fighting," says a 27-year-old LIS
airport worker, draft - exempt Portug
because he works for an air- announ
line. are as:
"I'M ONLY AFRAID of dy- cal po
ing of hunger. I'm always hun- by two
gry now. Sometimes, in a hor- bartilleri
rible dream, I am invited to a:
wonderful dinner, but just as A mil
we are going to begin it, I wake vealed
up." officers
A young man repairing a car Spinola,
in a garage asks: "Why fight Septerr
while the upper class is living Tuesda
nicely?" He explains he is inaction
the army but pays his salary to
his commander in return for his AFTE
freedom. the 20
- Armed
"Stop the war. Stop the war," nounce
says a market vendor, baby in assemi
arms, sitting behind a basket stitutio
of vegetables. "Otherwise we'll schedu
all be killed by rockets or hum-said t
k Revolu
ger. tutiona

take over govt.

3ON, Portugal (41) -
al's leftist military rulers
iced yesterday that they
suming permanent politi-
wers following an attack
air force planes on an
*y regiment near the Lis-
rp t.
litary spokesman also re-
the arrest of a group of
s loyal to Gen. Antonio de
a, ousted as president last
nber. The regime blamed
ay's brief attack on "re-
ary" elementsdheaded by
a, who escaped to Spain.
ER an all-night session,
?0 officers of the ruling
Forces Movement an-
d that elections for an
bly to write a new con-
n would be held as
led April 12. But they
they were setting up a
tionary Council to "insti-
lize" military participa-

V

tion in
life.

the country's political

The Communist party, which
has one member in Premier
V a s c o Goncalves' cabinet,
seemed likely to get the addi-
tional representation it has been
demanding. The officers voted
full support to any changes
Goncalves wants to make, and
the premier said in a broadcast
that the "political analysis of
the Communist party has al-
ways been correct."
Brig. Gen. Otelo Saraiva, the
government's securitychief,
implicated the United States,
saying U. S. ambassador Frank
Carlucci "had better leave aft-
er what h'appened yesterday."
"I CATEGORICALLY d e n y
that the U. S. Embassy or the
government was in any way in-
volved in events is Lisbon to-
day," said a State Department
spokesman in Washington.

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AP Photo
CAMBODIAN SOLDIERS carry guns while unloading sand
in U.S. ricebags for use as a bunker in front of Hotel Monorom
in downtown Phnom Penh. Communist rockets have hit near
the hotel in recent days killing and wounding a number of
people.

OFFICE HOURS

CIRCULATION - 764-0558

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COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS - 764-0557
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY-12:00 p.m.

Is

... that working for a
newspaper can be exciting,
frustrating, enjoyable and
refreshing

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DISPLAY ADS - 764-0554

written *. -

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MONDAY thru FRIDAY-12 p.m.-4 p.m.
Deadline for Sunday issue-
WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.
DEADLINE 3 days in advance by 3 p.m.
Thursday at 3 p.m. for Tuesday's paper

Why Not Joiln THE DAILY?.
A great place to meet people, drink 5c cokes and learn
about a newspaper on the Business, Editorial or Sports
Staffs

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frq.

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Frustrated by
University Policies ?

You can do something about it on University
Committees. There are immediate openings on
the following committees:

FOOD

CTIO

CO

ITIOl

0
0
i.
e
0

STUDENT RELATIONS
COMMITTEE ON COMMUNICATIONS
TEACHER AWARDS
STEERING COMMITTEE (Budqetinq)
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS BOARD
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

PRESENTS

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--ALSO--
0 ACADEMIC PLANNING ANALYSIS
COMMITTEE

lnterivews for all these committees will be held next Tues-
day and Wednesday (March 18 and 19). Stop by the SGC
offices, third floor of the Union, to sign up for an interview
and pick up an application form. Additional information is
available.

SUMMER INSTITUTE

11

ON

Film, Video and Photography
June 15 through July 4, 1975
Hampshire College, Amherst, Mass.
An intensive three-week program for the study
of film, video, photography and related media
arts. The Institute offers a unique curriculum
of seminars and workshops for six (6) credits.
Sponsored by the University Film Study Center.
SEMINARS
Anthropological Film, History of Avant-Garde Film,
Analysis, Contemporary V i d e o, Renoir: Critical Ap-
proaches, Screenwritinc, and Directinq Film Actors.
WORKSHOPS
Filmmaking, Animation, Optical Printing, Creative Half-
Inch Video, Experimental Studio Video, Photography'
and Photo Silk-Screen.
FACULTY
Richard Leacock, Ed Emshwiller, Roger Greenspun, Pat
O'Neill, Jonas Mekos, Robert Breer, Frank Daniel, Ann
McIntosh, Jerome Lieblinq, Hollis Frampton, Emilie de

THURSDAY, MARCH 13
10 A.M.-4 P.M.-School of Public Health
-"Symposium: WIC Program"-Women,
Infant and Children Supplement Feeding
Program Cut from Federal Budget. Topics:
funding, lobbying, medical evaluation, ad-
ministration, starting up a program.
1-3 P.M.-Angell Hall Aud. D-"Religious
and Cultural Aspects of Vegetarianism."
Moderator: Steve Gold.
3-5 P.M.-Angell Hall Aud. D-"How to
Start a Food Co-op." P&A 170 -
"Political and Economic Determinants in
the Allocation of Food Resources." PANEL:
Gavid Gordon, New School of Social Re-
search, Multinatinals; Jack Healey, Former
Executive American Fredom from Hunger
Foundation; Bart Burkehalter, Consulting
for AID, Community Systems Foundation..
8 P.M. - Hill Auditorium-"Perspectives
on the Global and National Food Situation:
What Do We Do Now?" Michael Jacobson,
National Food Day Coordinator; Co-Direc-
tor of Center for Science in the Public In-
terest, Washington, D.C. TOPIC: "Over-
view of the American Way." Hamid Taqi,
7 . .r . . , _ .A

FRIDAY, MARCH 14

10 A.M.-P & A, Rm. 170-"Food, Popu-
lation and Overconsumption." Science for
the People, sponsors.
3-5 P.M.-P & A Rm. 182-"Energy and
the Food System." Wilson Clark, Author
"Energy for Survival;" Jerry Goldstein, Edi-
tor Environmental Action Bulletin.
1-3 P.M.-Hill Aud.-"Corporate Manipu-
lation, Food Availability, and Consumer
Response." Ralph Nader.
8 P.M.-Hill Aud.-Panel Discussion: Ron
Dellums, Congressperson f ro m Berkeley,
Calif. TOPIC: "Poverty and Hunger."
Maryanne Mahaffey, Detroit Councilwo-
man; Chairperson City Council Food Stamp
Commission. TOPIC: "Politics, Poverty and
Urban Hunger." Jim Hightower, Formerly
of Agri-business Accountability Project.
TOPIC: "Food For Profit, Not For People."

SATURDAY, MARCH 15
ALL DAY-Modern Lang. Bldg. Aud. 4-
10 A.M.-Panel Discussion: "Old Habits,
New Changes in the American Diet: Who's
in Con tro l?" PANEL: Frances Lappe,
Author "Diet for a Small Planet;" Danny
Zwerdling, Washington Journalist (food
monopolies) ; R o b e r t Seymoure, Project
Apache, Nutritionist. VEGETARIAN
LUNCH-VEGETABLE UNION.
1 P.M. - Panel Discussion: "Changing
Structure of A m e r i c a n Agriculture."
PANEL: Dan McCurry, Food Co-op Project
of Loop College, Chicago; Hwerman Koe-
nig, MSU Dept. of Electrical Engineering
and Systems Science; Richard Rodenefeld,
MSU Dept. of Sociology.
3 P.M.-Panel Discussion: "Consumerism
and Advertising: Impact on Food Choice
and Availability." PANEL: Nancy Codi-
spoti, A c t i o n for Childrens' Television
(ACT; Esther Shapiro, President Consumer
Federation of America; Joan Gussow, Nu-
tritionist, Columbia University.
6 P.M. - AFRICAN DINNER-Memorial
Christian Church (Hill and Tappan).

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