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February 27, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-27

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rhursdoy, February 27, 1075

THE MICHIGAN- DAILY

rhursday, February 27, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sexes battle in

'Love' revue

By FELICA KOBYLANSKI
The age-old theme of love takes on
an exciting new look in Diane Daver-
man's Love a la Mode: or Two Acts
of Passion (in Fashion). By drawing
on various scenes from classical drama
Daverman creates an interesting vehi-
cle for presenting the "battle of the
sexes."
The program opened with an Eliza-
bethan piece -- John Lyly's "Love
Metamorphosis." The music, set, and
costumes immediately evoked a sense
of that period in England, a time when
the conflict between romantic love and
everyday reality was great.
The scene focuses on the efforts of
three young men to win the love of
their "disagreeable" ladies. Their at-
tempts are overseered by Cupid, god
of love, and Ceres, goddess of harvest,
both of whom end up battling between
themselves as they struggle to bring
the lovers together.
Mary Lou Zuelch as Ceres and Kathy
Eacker as one of the nymphs both turn-
ed in top-notch performances. Zuelch
was particularly effective in her hand-
ling of the dual natures of Ceres -
sweet and obliging on the one side
and sourly stern on the other.
Scenes from several Restoration piec-

es made up the .last half of Act L The
works selected presented a comic view
of the manners of "high society."
In this section, William Congreve's
Love for Love provided the inspiration
for one of the production's most hum-
orous episodes. The scene involved the
encounter of a fop and a country

edy Don Carlos. Here we were present-
ed with the poignant confrontation of
Carlos, the Crown Prince of Spain, and
Elizabeth, his stepmother and t h e
woman he loves.
Carol Skimin as Elizabeth of Valois
instilled her performance with g r e a t
feeling and sincerity. By contrast, Lou

"' Love a la Mode' ... captures the moods of the periods
explored ... and provides an interesting and humorous
look at the complexities of love. Indeed, the scenes
chosen for the production and the energy of the cast
were beautifully combined."
::: r v.::"-vJ:-r."::.t::; .. .^r.: yr..r'+ri 9 GYm e a .p""imr a r:+F:"}7:re Y.:}:\r:}{b"{>""'r"Fr r$:i"Y,.r" Ya ;.t;{'i}:r,::{j:

girl who had yet to learn the "rules of
the game.''
Kathy Eacker as the love-starved
maid again gave a marvelous perform-
ance. She sparked the character and
the show with a punchy humor. Mal-
colm MacKinnon as the fop who- at-
tempted to "civilize" her performed
the role with the necessary flair.
Act. II began on a more sombre note
with a scene from Friederich von
Schiller's 18th century romantic trag-

Brockway as her stepson was overly
dramatic in the role. He thus failed to
evoke a true sense of the inner suffer-
ing of Don Carlos.
A short 19th century French piece
by George Feydeau entitled Wooed and
Viewed concluded the performance.
The work is a farce on the dilemma
of love relationships.
Mary Lou Zuelch played Emma, the
haughty young woman who seeks re-
venge on her jealous husband by mak-

'Love a la Mode' cast

calnp4 flick4
Film groups offer a
diverse cinema sked
By JAMES VALK
WITH SPRING VACATION moving in officially tomorrow, the
cultural masses of Ann Arbor migrate to all points of the
globe, leaving the Big 'U' in a state of stupor. In following suit,e
the numerous campus film groups have suspended operations,s
leaving the cinematic responsibility in the hands of the localF
commercial theatres, which offer' sporadic quality at best. t
Young Frankenstein and Flesh Gordon are both worth see-2
ing, but for drastically different reasons. Lenny is a major dis-s
appointment that lends analytical curiosity to its flaws. And
Liliana Cavani's The Night Porter isn't even kinky as Joseph E.
Levine wanted us to believe.s
With bleakness occupying the present, it affords me the1
opportunity to gaze into the film fare that awaits the return ofa
the nomads. As usual, the film groups have come up with af
diversified list of films that promise an interesting post-vaca-
tion semester.t
WOODY ALLEN FANS cn sink their teeth into virtually any-c
thing they want, from his earliest What's Up Tiger Lily?
to his latest Sleeper. And through the good graces of the AnnC
Arbor Film Co-op, the yuc1ks keep rolling in with a Rocky andy
Bullwinkle program complete with Boris Badenov and company.t
Robert Altman again rates a mini-festival with three of hisI
works represented. His initial claim to fame, M*A*S*H, returnsc
.for the Nth time, and is probably worth an Nth viewing. Ther
Long Goodbye, with Elliot Gould as Altman's version of Philip
Marlowe, comes off as 'a very comfortable film to get into, but
is marred by the usual Altmanistic off-key ending.
The Amarcord kid, Federico Fellini, is noticably present by
three of his most diverse works. 8%, the director's autobiogra-
phy diary, is one of the great works of modern cinema, whilet
Satyricon, Fellini's most visually erotic film to date, remains per-t
haps his most flawed attempt.-
.THE BERGMAN FOLLOWING is not to be disappointed (it
never is), as three of his most popular films appear on
schedule. The Seventh Seal, perhaps Bergman's niost widely
admired work, returns as a classic tribute to the Swedish master.
The most penetratingly complex film yet done by the direc--
tor lies in his Persona, which ranks among the nine or ten best
films ever made. And Cries and Whispers, a beautifully deli-
cate film that explores the relationship between four women in
a country mansion, is one of the most masterfully composed
films ever made.
Luchino Visconti is given his fair share of representation
with an array of films. The Damned, which pits Dirk Bogarde
against the lushly decaying Nazi regime, is a massive attempt
that succeeds only in parts, ultimately relying too heavily on a
sustained plotline that is never clearly established.
Death In Venice, an interesting yet flawed adaptation of the
Thomas Mann novella, stands as a warped interpretation of the
work. Nevertheless, Visconti creates a stunning visual tour de
force that is matched only by Nicholas Roeg's dazzling cine-
matic expedition of the same city, the extraordinary Don't Look
Now.
T HE CINEMATIC SCHEDULE IS FILLED out with a grab-
bag of films that stand on their own diverse merits. Polan-
ski's Rosemary's Baby is a intellectual horror show that made
up in advance for the mess William Friedkin gave us, The Ex-
orcist.
Eisenstein's 1925 Potemkin is a sterling example of just how
sophisticated they ,really were back then, and holds its place as
one of the most significant films in the development of the
medium. Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, a primer in film technique,
is back, as is Bunuel's outrageous surrealistic masterpiece, The
Discreet Charm of the Bourgeosie.
T AST, but certainly not least, is the encore performance of
Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, slated sometime in
mid-April. Heading for number nine, I'm already counting off the
days until it arrives. If nothing else, that will make the semes-
ter worthwhile.

Zykina, balalaika delight an
enthusiastic Power audience

By SARAH POLAREK
A large Power Center audi-
ence was treated to a colorful
slice of Russian folk culture
Monday night. The Moscow
Balalaika Orchestra combined
talents with contralto Ludmila
Zykina in a performance which
sparkled with vitality.
The balalaika was originally
a simple, Russian peasant in-
strument, in use since about
1700. It has a triangular body
and three strings. In its modern
form, the balalaika comes in
six different sizes, from piccolo
to contra-bass. All of these sizes
combine to form a balalaika
orchestra.
The Moscow Balalaika Or-
chestra, best-known in the
world, features eight different
balalaikas, two accordions, a
bass violin, an electric guitar
and various, percussion instru-
ments. One of the accordionists
occasionally accompanies the
ensemble on piano.
The highlight of the program
was, of course, Ludmila Zykina.
Zykina's voice was full of reson-
ance and great strength, despite
the somewhat poor acoustics in
the University's Power Center.

Zykina performed some 15 or;
20 different Russian folk songs
in three sets, and was warmly
applauded after each. Although
great care was evidently taken
in choosing these songs, the
majority of them displayed the
melancholy beauty of these old
Russian ballads.
Zykina is reported by the
Musical Society to be "Russia's'
most popular folk artist." She
is famed for having begun her
singing career in a factory club
(a factory where she worked
as a lathe operator).
Zykina received the Lenin
Prize, the highest honor that
the USSR offers its. citizens, in
1970.
Highlights of the rest of thel
program included a "mitten
dance" performed by two dan-
cers in stunning native dress, a
xylophone solo by percussionist
Igor Chaschin,and another set
of folk songs sung- by baritone
Vitali Chaika.
Vitali Chaika's rendering of a
lively Russian folk song called
"Down - Piterskaya" was per-
haps the most popular number
of the program, although the
xylophone solo which introduced

the second act elicited a power-
ful audience response.
The entire company was call-3
ed back for numerouswcurtain
calls, and the Ann Arbor audi-
ence evidently appreciated the
fine program offered by this
extremely unusual ensemble
from the Soviet Union.
KC PHILHARMONIC
AT A ICONVENTION
KANSAS CITY P) -- The
Kansas City Philharmonic
opened and performed at the
Democratic P a r t y' s min-
iconvention here, the first time
a symphony orchestra har per-
formed at a national conven-
tion.
Following the National An-
them, the KC Philharmonic
played works by American
composers including Aaron
Copland, John Philips Sousa
and Scott Joplin.
Conductor Maurice Peress
said he and the musicians were
contributing their services "in
order to bring to the attention
of the political world their ap-
preciation of the government's
continuing support of the arts."

DROP IN
Fiber and
Weaving Workshops
EVERY SAT.
12-2 p.m.
at
EWE 'N DYE
994-1166
$7 for 2 hrs on Sat.
INCLUDES-
" unlimited weaving and
dyeing t i m e during the
week

* 10% OFF
plies w h i l e
course

on all sup-
taking the

Il' '1

Michigan Daily
Ars

314 S. 4TH ST. 761-3548
MOJO BOOGIE BAND
Feb. 27-28-March 1-2
MIXED BAG
March 3-4-$1.00
-entertainment 9:30 p.m.-
-dinners till I a.m.-
- } <G" 'ft"""C)O"t)<""? <."C"0<="">(<=> C<t> G o

- f

Richardson's Optical
OWEN KOCH TIMOTHY KOCH
STATE ST. AREA
0 PHYSICIANS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED
" PRESCRIPTION SUN GLASSES
" LARGE SELECTION OF FRAMES
* COMPLETE REPAIR SERVICE
DAILY 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 662-1945
SAT. til Noon
318 S. STATE-ANN ARBOR
Between Liberty & William On The Campus

-TONIGHT-
Indochina Peace Campaign in Ann Arbor presents
H.G. Wells' classic
War of the Worlds

I

11

THE MEDIEVAL &

RENAISSANCE COLLEGIUM
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FOR
1. Residence in the MARC House, located in
the N Entryway of the Law Quad.
2. The Post of G r a d u a t e Resident in the
MARC House.
The Graduate Resident's Room & Board are
paid by the Collegium.

Superb color production by
artist George Pal gives Wells'
tian invasion of America flair

special effects
story of a Mar-
and substance.

Natural Science Auditorium
7:30 & 9:30

OIL PINCH IN PRETORIA
PRETORIA, South Africa
W)) - The fleet of limousines
used by top government offi-
cials is being stored in garages
at the Arab oil embargo
against South Africa begins to
pinch the nation's gasoline sup-
plies.
Lourens Muller, minister of
transport, says ministers in fu-
ture will use a "lighter class"
of car.
The late model Cadillacs, he
said, would not be sold, but
would be reserved for official
purposes.
"Ministers and important:
state guests from abroad will
use these cars on special occa-

SHORT or LONG
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASE
DASCOLA
BARBERS
ARBORLAND-971 -9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733
E. LIBERTY-668-9329
E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354

March 4

TUESDAY

Spring break

I

APPLICATIONS MAY BE PICKED UP
AT N-12, THE LAW QUAD
For more information, call 763-2066 from 12-4 p.m.

a film by NELLY KAPLAN
A Very
Curious Girl

r0

-

i

11

NICHOLAS RAY NIGHT 1948
THEY LIVE BY NIGHT (at 7:00)
Starring Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell, this is one of the original
gangster-romance films that later inspired Penn's Bonnie and Clyde and
Altman's Thieves Like Us. Short: Neighbors, Oscar winner by Norman
MtA aren.

A young woman, forced in to prostitution by
poverty, takes on the petty bourgeoisie in a
town in the south of France, and wins.
March 18-TUESDAY
Ingmar Bergman's

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