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February 26, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 26, 1975

THE MIDEVIL &
RENAISSANCE COLLEGIUM
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FORj
1. Residences in the Mark House, located in
the Entryway of the Law Quad.
2. The Post of Graduate Residence in the
Mark House.
The Graduate Residences' Room & Board are
paid by the Collegium.
APPLICATIONS MAY BE PICKED UP
AT N-12, THE LAW QUADI
For more information, call 763-2066 from 12-4 p.m.

Democrats move to
kill oil depletion

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(Continued from Page 1)
tax preferences."
The House Rules Committeel
scheduled a hearing on the mat-
ter for today. A full House vote
on the legislation is set for
tomorrow.
The economic emergency tax
bill is a $16.2 billion blend of
individual tax rebate from 1974
and tax cuts for 1975, plus $5.07
billion worth of business tax
reductions, mainly by hiking
the investment tax credit as an
incentive to buy equipment and
machinery.

top rebate of $200. Anybody pay-
ing under $100 in such taxes for
last year simply wouldgettall
of it back, while other tax-
payers would get at least $100
and at most $200.
At the same time, the bill
would spread another roughly
$8.1 billion to individual tax-
payers in additional take-home
pay via lower tax withholding
this year. That would reflect
the bill's boosts in minimum
and maximum standard deduc-
tions used by the poor and those
who don't itemize.
For low-inbome individuals,

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With E
Pizz

VALUABLE COUPON
V EPSI
UPON REQUEST
very Medium or Larger
'a with This Coupon
Wed., Feb. 26th
769-8030
ONE COUPON PER PIZZA

FOR individuals, the tax bill the bill would give a 5 per cent
provides 55.1 per cent of its tax credit up to a maximum
relief to those with gross in- $200 credit. That would only go
come up to $10,000, 34.4 per to those with up to $6,000 in
cent to those with between $10,- gross income, aiming at helping
000 and $20,000 in gross income, the work poor.
and the remaining 10.5 per cent
to those with gross incomeI With goal posts moved behind
above $20,000. the end zone in the National
The bill distributes more than Football League in 1974 there
were 309 fewer field goals at-
t8.1 billion in lump-sum refunds tempted than in 1973. The
of a general 10 per cent of 1974 change meant 208 fewer field
federal income taxes up to a goals made.
Gay Academic Union
OF
The University of Michigan
PRESENTS
MIDWEST SPRING CONFERENCE
A CALL TO ACTION

AP Photo
PRESIDENT FORD hoists a copy of his controversial energy plan yesterday as he spoke
at a White House conference on Domestic and Economic affairs in Hollywood, Florida. The
trip was Ford's fourth this month in an effort to gain support for his program.

MA RCH 7-8-9,

1975

Rackham School of Graduate Studies
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michiqan
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
* ELAINE NOBLE-Massachusetts
State Representative
* ALLEN SPEAR-Minnesota
State Senator
* Workshops-Social Activities
GAY ACADEMIC UNION-325 Michigan Union
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104-(313) 763-4186

PARK
TERRACE
848 Tappan
at Oakland
Deluxe 1 and 2
Bedroom Apartments
See Don or Marilyn Olsen
APT. 10

Pi*lot

looks 'to
' -f - Oleo n y

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PROGRAM IN FLUX:

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(Continued from Page 1) doesn't exist anywhere else on
that the intensity of political campus."
and social commitment leads, at
times, to an intolerance on the THE MOST recent example1
part of a few toward differing of Pilot's sense of communityI
views. interaction came upon the an-j
While they admit to having nouncement of the Graduate
their share of troubles, Pilot Employes strike. Pilot students
participants are quick to say quickly proved themselves some
that they believe the dorm to be of the most active supporters of
the best on campus. . the strike, by participating in
"Pilot's strength is in pro- picket lines and boycotting '
cess," stated Lobe. "It is in classes.-
a quality of interaction that "It wasn't just because of the
-- strike, it was because of Pilot,"
said Carol Fleisher, a Pilot
chiUiL E bdvi y y a r e d

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or call 769-5014

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future
other dorms. Couzens, for ex-
ample, recently began a mini-
Pilot program geared to the
needs of its predominantly
nursing and engineering resi-
dents.
Although there are divergent,
and sometimes clashing notions
in Alice Lloyd Hall as to where
Pilot is, and where it may be
going, the necessity for its
existence has never been ques-
tioned. Above all, residents be-
lieve, Pilot is a feeling, a con-
viction that people have a stake
in the welfare of those around
them.
"In October of my freshman
year," said Carol Fleisher, re-
calling a fond memory of Pilot,
"there was a fire drill at about
one in the morning, and after-
wards, they made everybody
come back through the front
doors. There were about eight
RFs there in the lobby serving
ice cream to everybody who
came out for the drill."
A

A O
Acareer in law-
without law school.
What can you do with only a bachelor's degree?
Now there is a way to bridge the gap between an
undergraduate education and a challenging, respon-
sible career. The Lawyer's Assistant is able to do work
traditionally done by lawyers.
Three months of intensive training can give you
the skills - the courses are taught by lawyers. You
choose one of the six courses offered-choose the city
in which you want to work.
Since 1970, The Institute of Paralegal Training
has placed more than 700 graduates in law firms, banks,
and corporations in over 60 cities.
If you are a student of high academic standing
and are interested in a career as a Lawyer's Assistant,
we'd like to meet vou.
Contact your placement office for an interview with
our representative
We will visit your campus on
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY
MARCH 19 andZ20
The Institute of
Paralegal Training
235 South 17th Street, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19103
(215) 732-6600

siticeni . very o y;ar
enough to be there."
Looking to the future, Pilot
intends to expand its commit-
ment to the community. Pilot's
Long Range Planning Commit-
tee has designated next year's
theme as "Community and Com-
mitment in Light of American
! Values."
ALSO looking ahead Munson
said that he would like to see
Pilot sponsor about ten stu-
dents to spend a semester doing
field work with environmental
advocacy groups in Montana
and Wyoming, and then return-
ing to share their experiences.
Munson feels that Pilot-type
programs could be expanded to

. 761-9700
SHOWTIMES: Sun.-Thurs.: 1-3-5-7-9; Fri. & Sat.: 1-3-5-7-9-11

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--____________,______

Fmena nd, k9e7i9
FEBRUARY 26, 1975

FEBRUARY 27, 1975
11:00-12:30 Workshops
9:00-10:30 a.m. Workshops
(A complete list of workshops will be avail-
able from the Office of Ethics and Religion
at the time of registration)

1:00-3:00 p.m. Symposium Registration,
Office of Ethics and Religion
3rd Floor, Michigan Union,
764-7442
3:00-5:00 Multi-Media presentation,
"IN THE LIFE OF A
WOMAN,,
(open discussion including
all available participants
Kuenzel Lounge, Mich. Union
8:30-10:30 "WHERE ARE WE NOW?
THE CONTEMPORARY
WOMEN'S MOVEMENT
AND THE MEANING
OF FREEDOM?"
by Penelope Washburn,
St. Johns College,
I i .: .._ .. _ r

1 :30-3:30 p.m.
4:00-6:00

"THE CONTEMPORARY
WOMEN'S MOVEMENT
AND ITS EFFECT ON
BLACK WOMEN AND
THE CHURCH"
by Sarah Ward, Director,
Program for Children
with Learning Problems,
Education & Training
Division of Model
City Administration,
Boston, Mass.
Kuenzel Lounge, Mich. Union
"THE CONTEMPORARY
WOMEN'S MOVEMENT
AND ITS EFFECTS ON
TRADITIONAL RELIGIONS"
by Jewish Speaker-
Ms. Carol Weiner,
Dept. Head, Hebrew
Ininn nllar I ihrnrv

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