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February 26, 1975 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-26

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Wednesday, February 26, 197

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 26, 19Th THE MICHIGAN DAILY
1'

Sports of The Daily
Paddlers place

f

Over the weekend, 132 paddleball enthusiasts converged on
East Lansing to fight for state paddleball honors. Michigan
graduates, faculty and undergrads competed and placed in the
various categories.
According to Michigan's Richard Pitcher, National Paddleball
Association President, "Michigan had a few people in the top
ranks. The tournament was held at Michigan State so not as
many people from around here competed as were eligible."
Chip Curtis made it to the men's singles finals but lost
21-16, 21-13 to the defending champion Dick Jury of Lansing.
In women's singles, Elyse Jacob finished fourth. She garnered
a third in doubles.
Placing ahead of Jacob in that last event, Barb Johnston and
defending co-champion Terry Davis took second place afterr
Connie and Carol Stewart.
In the consolation double finals, Pitcher and Ron Pudduck
pulled out a first.
-MARCIA MERKER
W'restlers acclaimed
Michigan wrestler Jim Brown was named to the Amateur
Wrestling News' All-American Second Team, the publication
reported recently.
Brown, a heavy favorite for Big Ten honors at 118 pounds
this year, placed behind Slippery Rock's Jack Spates.
Wolverine 177-pounder Mark Johnson was a third-team selec-
tion, while 142-pounder Bill Schuck received honorable mention.

Mn erys
By LEBA HERTZ RANDY
When the National Hockey League's pick the thr
Atlanta Flames came to Detroit this past Doug Linds
weekend to play the Red Wings Saturday Robbie Mo
night, one of their players took a detour tacular sav
Friday night to Yost Ice Arena. "I think
Defenseman Randy Manery did not picks hisL
come to watch the Wolverines for any or- listened to
dinary reason. He came to see his broth- it's always
er, Kris Manery, play for Michigan. critic. He k
"I haven't seen Kris play in about five Randy pl
or six years", Randy said, "He's much Junior A H
more aggressive than before." tending Mc
"I'VE PICKED UP QUITE A BIT in "I WASI
my days from when he used to call me both school
the biggest chicken on the ice", Kris re- A," Randy
sprnded, "Yeah I've changed quite a bit." coming toI
After Friday's game, Randy advised Dan Farrel
his brother on his play. "Now the
"He said that I was maybe too over- lege hockey
lv aggressive," Kris said, "that I was "Just as m
running around a lot, looking for hits from colleg
that I didn't have to go through with. "Randy n
"He said that I shonld hit the man or the oth
that had the puck instead of running Junior orc
arofrnd a little more. I wouldn't be as my own d
tired nit. RThndv said that he didn't know looked at w
of anyone in the NHL that did that kind chances we
of thing. They had contact, but it was to put the1
always with the man with the puck. "All Ran
it wasn't a running around kind of key. Youe
thing". have your

WAS ASKED BY WCBN to
ee stars of the game. He chose
kog, who had two goals, goalie
ore who executed some spec-
es, and Angie Moretto.
he's really objective when he
stars," Kris remarked, "I've
what he's always told me and
helped me a lot. He's a good
knows his hockey."
layed three years of Canada
Hockey at Hamilton, while at-
Calaster College.
LUCKY THAT I COULD GET
l and hockey while in Junior
said, "Kris had the best deal
Michigan. He liked the coach,
;1.
ere is more coming out of col-
y than before," he continued,
many players are being drafted
e now as in Junior hockey."
never tried to tell me one way
er which way to go as far as
college, so it was pretty well
decision," Kris remarked, "I
vhat he had done and what my
re and I didn't think I wanted
time in.
dy did was study and play hoc-
can do both at Michigan and
social life too."

Randy never got the opportunity to see
his brother score as Kris was shut out
Friday night in the Wolverines 5-3 tri-
umph over Denver, but he did tally the
first goal Saturday night in a 6-5 loss for
Michigan.
THE FLAMES, CURRENTLY IN
FOURTH place in Division I with 61
points, need only four points to tie the
New York Islanders and move into third
spot and a play-off berth.
The St. Louis Blues in Division II and
the Toronto Maple Leafs in Division IV
hold commanding leads in third place, but
have point totals less than the Flames.
"We made the playoffs last year with
the same situation," Randy said, "Teams
in the other league had better records
than us.
In last year's Stanley Cup Playoffs, At-
lanta lost in the first round to eventual
champion, the Philadelphia Flyers.
In a few years, Randy might have to
face the possibility of playing against his
brother who is protected by the NHL
California Seals, in addition to the WHA
Vancouver Blazers.
With such families as the Espositos, the
Howes and the Hulls making good in the
National Hockey League, perhaps a new
brother team, the Manery's, will enter
the hearts of NHL fans.

Page Seven
collaborate

Doily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
Manery moves in on puck

Tribe acquires Boog
Boog Powell, the slipping slugger of the BaltimoreC
was traded to the Cleveland Indians Tuesday along with
Don Hood in exchange for catcher Dave Duncan and
league outfielder Alvin McGrew.
Clemson, caught
Investigators for the National Collegiate Athletic Asso
have been told that at least two former Clemson Uni
basketball players received free airline tickets for the:
sonal use in violation of NCAA rules, the Washington P
ported in yesterday's editions.
Major League Standings

Orioles,
pitcher
minor

PREPARES FOR BIG TENS
Curby restles frustration

The Friends of the Sun
present
WE ARE THE

By RICK BONINO

NHL
Division I

Philadelphia
N. T. Rangers
N. Y. Islanders
Atlanta
Division
Vancouver
Chicago
St. Louis
Minnesota
Kansas City
Division
Montreal
Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
Detroit
Washington
Division
Buffalo
Boston
Toronto
California:,
Yesterday's+
Boston 6; Pittsburgh

W
35
30
26
24
tn 2
30
29
23
17
14
in 3
35
33
26
17
6

L
16
19
21
23
23
27
25
37
39
10
11
22
33
52

T Pts.
9 79
13 73
15 67
13 61

6
7
12
6
16
16
13
10
5
12
11
11
11

66
65
58
40
36
86
82,
65
44
17
88
75
55
43

NBA
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L P
Boston 42 18 .7
Buffalo 39 23 .6
New York 29 32 .4
Philadelphia 26 36 .4
Central Division
Washington 45 17 .7
Cleveland 32 30 .5
Houston 32 31 .5
Atlanta 24 40 .3
New Orleans 14 46 .2
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Chicago 38 22 A6
K.C.-Omaha 35 27 .5
Detroit 32 32 .5
Milwaukee 28 32 .4
Pacific Division
Golden State 36 25 .5'
Seattle 30 32 .1
Phoenix 25 33 .4
Portland 24 37 .3
Los Angeles 21 39 .3

-AP Nice guys don't always finish3
last - they just have to try
harder sometimes.
Michigan wrestler Dave Curby
illustrates this modified maxim.;j
Curby's Michigan career reads
ciation like a Horatio Alger novel.t
versity After two lackluster years,.
ir per- the walk-on established himself!
ost re- as an outstanding wrestler as]
a junior. He took Big Ten cham-t
pionship honors at 190 pounds,
only to lose 1-0 in overtime on a
referee's decision in the open-
o* ing round of the NCAA tourna-:
~:ment.
Curby entered this season
w i t h understandably h i g h{
hones. Named as new coachc
Bill Johannesen's first cap-1
Pet. GB tam, the senior had one last
too - shot at going all the way.
29 4 Then fate stepped into Cur-
195 17 bv's career. Hle tore knee car-
tilage during the second week1
'26 - f oractice, and then contraed'
16 13 mononucleosis as the season
08 13% opened.
75 2
33 3b Just when Curbv was working
himself back into shane, he
separated a shoylder in the De-
- -- cember Midlands tournament.
565 8 Dave Curby's 1975 hopes suf-.
67 10 fered a severe setback.
"I had great hones for this1
84 season," C'rby said. "I wanted
31 9% to o undefeated, place 'n theI
93 12 Midlands, and win the Pig
50 14% Tens."
The injuries were a stagger-;
ing blow to the steady develop-'
ment that has characterized
Curhv's career.
- "I haven't been able to de-
velon this segaon like I want-
ed to," he said. "I could win

the Big Tens but still not be Curby now turns his attention
as good as I was last year." to his weekend's Big Ten meet.
"Dave didn't know that much He appears ready, both physi-'
about wrestling his first two cally and mentally.]
years, but he's really come on "I can still win the Big Ten,I
since then," said Johannesen. and that's the most important
"He's one of the guttiest guys thing now," Curby said. "I'vel
on the team." still got a lot of confidence."
'Dave's very into wrestling," Curby also refutes charges
added assistant coach Cal Jenk- that he can't handle Wiscon-I
ins. "He's really enthusiastic. sin's outstanding 190-pounder,
He can't stop learning more Laurent Soucie.
about wrestling." "The papers have said I've
"Some wrestlers have more never beaten Soucie, but I
ability than Dave Curby, but beat him in the AAU tourria-
they don't have his determina- ment last summer," Curby
tion and desire," Johannesen said. "I think I can beat
concluded. Ihim."
Johannesen feels that Curby's Curby holds a unique advent-
dedication makes him an ideal I age over most other wrestlers.1
captain. Regardless of his tournament
"Dave leads by example," performances, Curby's wrestling
Johannesen declared. career will be far from fiished.
Curby has had little cnance "If I don't finish well this
to lead by example this season. year, it's not the end of the;
His injuries often relgated him world," Curby said. "I plan on
to the be - cheering on lis wrestling for another ten years.;

I'd like to become as g'uid es
I can possibly be."
Curby's long-range plans help
him take this year's disaopoint-
ments in stride.
"This year was a real test
of my character," Curby said.
"I have to try to overcome
my handicaps and take pride
in that. I have to keep my
confidence."
Curby's future confidence can
only benefit from his second-
place finish in the AAU free-
style tourney. Curby hopes he
can continue his wrestling suc-
cess into eventual Olympic com-
petition.
"I really dig the intenational
angle," Curby said. "I'd like to
train and wrestle in Europe."
Curby still finds many chan-
nels for his wrestling enthu-
siasm at home. In addition to
wrestling for the Blue, Dave
instructs a youngsters' wres-
tling club, the Wrestling War-

in 4
38 11
32 19
22 29
16 36
Games
4

1
1
l

riors.
"It's a 1 o o s e 1 y organized'
thing," Curby said. "A Dunch of
kids get together two nights a
week to practice, and then they
can compete in freestyle tour-
naments-if they want to.
"It's a real good experience
working with the kids," Curby
said.
Dave Curby may not win this
year's Big Tens. He may never
even fulfill his Olympic dreams.
But any Wrestling Warrior can
tell you that Dave Curby is a,
true champion.
DROP IN
Fiber and
Weaving Workshops
EVERY SAT.
12-2 p.m.
at
EWE 'HDYE
994-11661
$7 for 2 hrs on Sat.
INCLUDES:
" unlimited weaving and
dyeing t i m e during the
week

PALESTIN IAN
PEOPLE
and
RAM PA RTS

more. fortunate teammates.
"That was the most depress-
kng part," Curby admitted. "I'd
like to do well while I'm the
cantain on a good team."
Still, COrby has had as im-
pact on the squad.
"Dave is really an insnira-
tion," said senior teammate
Bill Schuck. "He really enjoys
working."
Fortunately for Curby, his
snectator days are over. Since
returning to the lineup for
the second time nearly a
morth ago, Dave has shown
s t e a d y improvement. He
closed out his Michigan dual
meet career with a fall in last
weekend's Toledo meet.

F;

'4Oolverine of the W~eek

I

Yesterday's Games-
Washington 111, Buffalo 93
Seattle 102 N,ew York 101
Kansas City-Omaha 93,
Milwaukee 90
Chicago 120, New Orleans 105
Houston 114, Cleveland 87
Phoenix at Golden State, Inc
Philadelphia at Portland, inc

New YorkIslanders 3, St. Louis 0
Chicago 6, Washington 2
Toronto 9, Minnesota 2

I

This week's "Wolverine of
the week" is Michigan gym-
nastics coach, Newt Loken.
Last Saturday, Loken won his
200th dual meet victory, as
Michigan wallopped defending
Big Ten champion Iowa, 215 to
205.
Loken attended Minnesota
during his college days, where
he first achieved stardom, as
a gymnast when he won back-
to-back Big Ten all-around titles
in 1941 and 1942.
Loken's regime as coach at
Michigan began in 1947, and he
has been at the helm since.
In that time, his teams have
come through with eleven Big
rTen titles, including six in a
row during the 1960's. Michi-
gan has also captured two
NCAA titles under Loken, those
occurring in 1963 and 1970.
This year Michigan's tumb-
lers have defeated their op-
ponents six times in seven dual
meets. They will try to recap-
ture the Big Ten champion-

ship when the other contenders
travel to Ann Arbor to com-
pete in the Big Tens on March
27-28.

OF CLAY

* 10% OFF on all sup-
plies w h i l e taking the
course

WED., FEB. 26
Modern Language
Building
COMPLETE SHOWS 7 & 9:30
$1.25-BOTH SHOWS $2.00

Track

spirit

sparked

I1

think.

By MARYBETH DILLON
Michigan's track program could not be rated much
above mediocre in recent years. This fall, however, a
change in this trend emerged as the Michigan harriers
brought home the Big Ten cross country championship.
This turn around could be attributed to two things.
One is the recruiting of top high school athletes by former
coach Dixon Farmer. The other is the advent of a young,
new coaching staff.
Jack Harvey took over the top spot when Farmer re-
signed last season after three improved but somewhat
disappointing years. Ron Warhurst signed on as assistant
this fall to fill the spot vacated by Harvey.
WARHURST HANDLES the distance men for the Wol-
verines. In his college career he ran on a two-time na-
tional championship cross country team at Western
Michigan. Last year he coached under Bob Parks at
Eastern Michigan, and knows the discipline required for a
winning track team.
"I'm kind of a dictator," says Warhurst, stressing his

philosophy of hard physical conditioning.
Like Warhurst, Harvey has an extensive track back-
ground. A 1967 Michigan graduate, he played football and
threw the shot, holding a Big Ten record in that event
for several years.
He then moved on to the University of Nevada, where
he attended grad school and began coaching. After a
year out west, he came back to Michigan and worked
as an assistant under Farmer.
BOTH COACHES have built up a rapport with the
team that is reflected in winning attitudes and winning
ways.
"They'd do anything to help anybody," said distance
runner Greg Meyer., "They're both really great guys, easy
to get along with, and are always available."
Shotputter George Przygodski agreed. "Harvey and
Warhurst both care about the individual, not just the
team."
With coaching, attitude, and talent on the rise, it looks
like Michigan track mediocrity is just a page of ancient
history.

which radio station in the Ann Arbor area:
programs contemporary-rock music without the hype?
broadcasts in QUAD-in the Dolby System?
is backed by 10,000 watts of power?
informs you of local happenings?
is involved in the community? "
is on the air 24 hours a day?
is In Touch with today?
is designed for you?
WIQB/103
FM-so ...
plug into QUADROCK

Little Libels evolve
from Fritz's turmoil)

BANK AMERICARD
MASTER CHARGE
UNION OIL
vw66-71 BUG

By Ffats Stroppst
The subdued atmosphere of
the Libel lockerroom hardly dis-
guised the growing revolution-
ary tension pervading through-i
out. Libel coach H.O. "Fritz"
Glazer quivered audibly in an'
unseculded corner.
"It was Lange and Irapsky,"
harrangued the harassed men-

O'Hara violently, "and Schiller
here is formin' his own 5-9
team. With Tom 'The Stilt'
Cameron, Scott 'Tony Rizzo'
Lewis, 'Big Daddy' Stieg and
Rick 'Trash Masher' Bonino,
we'll kick some can!"
c r n C ll

Katy Mellen. Graduated in '71 with a
B.S. in Textiles and Clothing. Doing
well - and moving forward - in Car-
gill's commodity Marketing Division.
GROWTH
Graduating Seniors and M.B.A.'s:
Accounting * Agriculture * Business"
Engineering " Liberal Arts
Cargill-at the leading edge. Active in agricul-
tural, industrial, and consumer commodities
and products, and in a variety of other related
businesses. You could be there! We need top
people for a wide range of positions, careers
that lead to management. Our policy is to
stimulate leadership potential. To encourage
personal creativity. To recognize and reward
individual achievement. And to promote from
within

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