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February 25, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-25

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 25, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Tuesday, February 25~ 1975

BANK AMERICARD
MASTER CHARGE
UNION OIL

Voting procedure questioned GEG nears settlement

66-71 BUG
A SUPER ONE-TIME BUY ON
ENABLES US TO INSTALL A
MUFFLER, PARTS & LABOR FOR

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THIS IS A SAVINGS OF $16.10l
Howard Cooper Volkswagen, Inc.

By ANN MARIE LIPINSKI
City Council last night voiced
concern over the possibility
that the ballot submitted by the
City Election Commission for
preferential voting (PV) in the
mayoral election will confuse
voters and cause significant in-
validation of ballots.
Preferential voting is a City
Charter amendment passed by
local voters in November
which allows a ,voter to list
an infinite number of choices
for mayor. PV was drawn up
by the Human Rights Party
(HRP) with the intention of
safeguarding against the elec-
tion of a candidate receiving
less than a majority of votes.
"I THINK we are now seeing
what a cathartic system pre-
ferential voting it," Councilman
Louis Belcher (R-Fifth Ward)
told council. "We've got such a
massive problem that we have
to be concerned about whether

voters will be disenfranchised
or not. After one try at this
voters will be ready to go back
to the old system."
Belcher said he fears that
d e s p i t e instructions ac-
companying each ballot, voters
unfamiliar with the new sys-
tem will incorrectly mark their
mayoral choices. Placing an
"X," for example, instead of
a number "1" or "2" next to
a candidates name would in-
validate a ballot.
Councilman John McCormick
(R-Fifth Ward) said he had
heard that "an estimated 20 per
cent of votes would be spoiled"
due to incorrect ballot marking.
STRESSING his concern for
voter education in regard to
preferential PV voting, Mayor
James Stevenson said, "I would
like Council to authorize or ask
me to send copies of ballots out
to voters with clear instructions
on how to vote and on possible

dangers in voting."
"Such a letter would have its
advantage coming from the'
highest office in the city," said1
Stevenson.
Councilman Jamie Kenwor-
thy (D-Fourth Ward) opposed
Stevenson's suggestion saying,
"If sent, the letter should come
from the city clerk and not
from you since you are a can-
didate for mayor."
STEVENSON .assured'
council that he "was not plan-
ning to send a campaign let-,
ter," but Democratic council
members continued to voice op-
position.
"It would be highly unethical
if not totally out of line to have
Jim Stevenson send this letter
out," objected councilwoman
Colleen McGee (D-First Ward).
It would cost the city an esti-
mated $8,000 to send first class
letters to its 80,000 voters. E

(Continued from Page 1)
and the GEO negotiating jeans
will have to accept the Univer-
sity package as it stands.
SECOND, they must rely on
Teamster truckers, who deliiver
University supplies, to honor
union ticket lines in greater
numbers. This is the last weap-
on for direct pressure on the
University that the GEO has.
There are indications that?
Teamster support is increas-
ing, and that the withholding of
supplies is slowly wearing Uni-
versity resources down to a
dangerous point.
Some truckers have claimed
in the past few days that the
University is drastically short
of gasoline and oil for its fleet
of trucks and buses. The ve-
hicles are now forced 1o buy
their fuel from commergal
dealers at regular rates. Pre-
viously they have drawn froml
fuel supplies bought at whole-
sale prices.
UNION picketers have also
caused the shutdown of the
University incinerator. N o w
garbage must be hauled to Ypsi-
lanti at considerable cost. In
addition, Ann Arbor police hired

t
i
1
+{
4
f
a
t

to monitor picket lines are re- bers of teaching assistants are
portedly being paid '12 an hour meeting their sections off-cam-
by the University. pus. The picketers have virtual-
While all this is cowing the ly abandoned classroom build
University some mnev, it is ings in favor of the loading
not enough to bring teI mstitt- docks.
tion to an immediate halt, and GEO members must also face
additional support miuot come the fact that the longer the
from Teamsters. strike wears on the more time
AFSCME t r u c k s distribute departments will have to deer-.
supplies throughout the Uner- mine which Graduate Student
sity, bat as they are contrac- Assistants (GSA's) are working
tually prevented from honoring and which are on strike. It is
the picket lines of another only a matter of time before
union, the support must come pay will be withheld from
from Teamsters, who deliver to strikers.
the main University :ading If a settlement is not reached
docks from Detroit and else-
where.by the time the decision of
THE GEO has lost the buk state-appointed fact - finder Pa-
THE EO hs lot th b~, trick McDonald, the GEO may
of its undergraduate support -aI face an additional setback. The
factor which was consi.dered cunion expects McDonald's back-
very important to the successxd
of the strike two weeks ago. ground in management will
Even in LSA lectures are well- sway his decision in favor of
attended and increasing nim- the University.

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BOWMAN GT-8o0 List $4995
8-track under-dash SALE$19
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In-Dash
DELUXE 8-TRACK STEREO TAPE PLAYER
WITH AM/FM STEREO RADIO
Looks like an ordinary top-auality AM/FM stereo List $154.95
radio until 8-track stereo cartridge is inserted into
slot behind flip-in radio dial. AM/FM stereo/FM
mono switch, pushbutton, local-distance and eject,
adjustable shafts.
LEAR JET A-72
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FSTER CASSETTE WITH AM/DM,IList $229.95 Sale 1169.95
FM/STEREO RADIO
Adjustable shafts, fast forward, automatic and
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WITH AM/FM STEREO RADIO
Bomans deluxe cassette player, this unit has a List $189.95 Sale 1 39.95
pushbutton eject, fast forward and refind, and a
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JENSEN 6x9 20 ohm
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TUESDAY
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OUR GENUINE
$1.79 RIB-EYE STEAK
FOR ONLY

Tuesday, February 25
Day Calendar
WUOM: Panel discussion on wo-
men's rights, with State Rep. Perry
Bullard & Sen. Gilbert Bursley,l
moderator, Wendy wells, Legisla-
tive Action Task Force coord., spon-
sored by NOW, 10:05 am.
MHRI: Luct Titunik, astrologer,
"Astrology as an Information Sci-
ence: The Relation between Inner
and Outer Space," 2055 MHRI, 10:30
am-noon.
Medical Ctr. Commission for Wo-
men Meeting: C3086 Outpatient,
noon.I
Environmental Studies: E. Pleck,
"The City, the Factory, and In-
dustrial Growth," 4001 CC Little, 3
pm.
Task Force on Student Counsel-
ing Meeting: 304 Union, 3:30.
Botany: Dr. James Bassham, UC-
Berkeley, "Regulation of Photosyn-
thetic Carbon Metabolism," Lee.
Rm. 2, MLB, 4 pm.
Ctr. Coordination Ancient, Mod-
ern Studies: Chas. Witke, "Apu-
leius' Golden Ass," 2408 Mason
Hall, 4 pm.
English, Ext. Service: Poetry
reading, Jerome Rothenberg, Aud. 3,
MLB, 4:10 pm.
Physics: Dr. J. Krisch, "Informal
Seminar on Some Implications of
the Non-existence of the Al" 2038
Randall Lab., 4:15 pm.
Bio-Ethics: Edmund Pelligreno,
chmn, Bd. Yale-New Haven Med.
Ctr., "Health Care Delivery," Rack-
ham Amph., 7:30 pm.
Music School: Wind recital, Re-
cital Hall. 12:30 pm; degree recital,
Don Williams, Clarinet doctoral,

$

1 K
.*r:.
,-
y = ,.
=+.:

Recital Hall, 8 pm; Chamber Or-
chestra, Rackham Aud., 8 pm.
UM Chapter, Labor Party: Robt.
Moon. U of Chicago, "The Feasibil-
ity of Fusion Power within 5-7
years," Michigan Rm., League, 8
pm.
General Notices
CRISP: Registration thru CRISP
for Fall, Spring Half, & Spring-
Summer will be controlled by reg-
istration appt. cards, equally dis-
tributed to all participating units
at a time determined by each unit.
Some units may begin distribution
immed. after spring vacation, while
others will begin later, according
to the needs of their students.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7460
Rotary Clubs offer 1 graduate
fellowship from each district, to
cover education and living expenses
plus transportation, for study in
any field and in foreign countries;
Also undergrad scholarships, awards
to teachers of the handicapped, and
for technical training; more infor-
mation at CP&P.
Harvard Summer School offers
their annual course in publishing,
June 30-Aug. 8, $600. Good record
of placements in maggzine & book
publishing, etc. Write Mrs. Diggory
venn, Dir., 10 Garden St., Cam-
bridge, Ma 02138.
For 12-month MA in Poll Sci
at McMaster U. in Canada, fellow-
ships of $3,950-$4,650. Includes
teaching experience and possible
seminar in Eastern Europe. Write:
Prof. romke, Hamilton, Ontario
LUS 4M4.

Indochina Peace Campaign in Ann Arbor
PRESENTS

INCLUDES:
TOSSED
SALAD
BAKED
POTATO
HEARTHSTONE
TOAST

Barbra
Streisand

Robert
Redford

in
TH E WAY
WE WERE
A beautiful Jewish fellow-traveler
of the Communist party, and a
blue blood jock improbably fall
for each o t h e r in this moody
comedy. Unforgettable.

YOUR BUCK
BUYS MORE

7:15

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across from
Lee Oldsmobile

Modern Language Auditorium

$1 .25 contribution

994-9041

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11W ",llllwSingers, musicians,
dancers, technicians,
magicians, banjo
players, acrobats,
piano players,
puppeteers,
novelty acts .d
it takes all kinds of
talent to entertain Cedar Point's 2,500,000 summer
guests, and the search is on. So, check the audition
schedule, polish up your act and come show us your
talent. Technicians, come for an interview with Cedar
Point's Live Shows. YOU'LL COME ALIVE IN '75!
AUDITION AND INTERVIEW SCHEDULE
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-- Fri., February 28, 1975 Detroit, Michigan--Thurs, March 6, 1975
Cdrncgi cMellon U0niver Sity, Stude'nt A( Ivtics eIter Poncflrvyi t elICKPlaza i io't"":"
Intrviews--3:00 P.M. Audtni 40 .M. Inviews-00 P.M Auiions -, 4:00 PM.
Sandusky. Ohio-Sat., March 8, 1975
Indianapolis, Indiana -Sun., March 2, 1975 rAreas East of Sandusky)
lStouffer's Indianapolis Inn, Balroomn Cedar Point Centennial Theatre
Interviews--3:00 P.M. Auditions-4:(0 PM. Interviews--10:00 A M. Auditions - 11:00 A.M.
Sandusky, Ohio-Sun., March 9, 1975
C1,inc ii, hio- Tues.,- March 4, 1975 A,"~ ., , c.rutv

A INII

IITFnT A ELI ABALT

LEUJTED

e

I

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