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February 25, 1975 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesdoy; February 25 I975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesda yerary 5 17 HEMCIGN IL ae ee

full court
PRESS
Home court.. .
...a big advantage~
-MADISON
By JEFF SCHILLER
JOHNNY ORR always uses the same phrases. So when the
Michigan coach says something like, "It's tough to win on
the road," or "any Big Ten team can beat any other on a given
night," there are those who tend to disregard his words.
All the 'Dump Orr' campaigns and Sports Illustrated articles
notwithstanding Johnny Orr is a knowledgeable basketball coach.
His words are often prophetic. Last night's 70-68 loss to Wis-
consin should at least quell the skeptics.
It's easy to point to the Wolverines' 22 turnovers as evidence
of ineptitude. Or claim that had Wisconsin shot better than
38 per cent from the floor, the game might not have been so
close. Michigan could have, and maybe even should have, beat
the Badgers.
EXPLANATIONS? There are many. It was a game of inches.
But one of the cardinal 'rules of he road' is that the breaks go
against you when you are the visitors.
John Robinson was called for travelling four times in the
second half. None of them was a clear violation. Steve Grote was
charged with a technical late in first half for yelling, "Come on"
to the referee. And the Wolverines were whistled down for not
advancing the ball while trying to stall away the game's re-
maining. moments.
This is not to say that the officials ganged up on Michigan,
or that there weren't questionable calls on Wisconsin as well.
But the close ones seemed to go consistently against the Wol-
verines, and in a game this tight even the slightest difference is
enough.
WHAT CAUSED Michigan's surplus of 'bad breaks'? The
best guess is the color of its uniforms. It's not that referees
dislike the color blue. It's just that 'blue' signifies visitors, and
referees, as human beings, are understandably swayed in
borderline cases by a partisan crowd.
The home team has won about two-thirds of the Big Ten
basketball games this season. Often the difference in score
the homecourt provides is tremendous. MSU beat Wisconsin by
18 points in East Lansing, yet lost by 7 in Madison. Indiana
routed Purdue 104-71 at home, but the Hoosiers barely managed
a one-point win on the road.
There are other factors beside the crowd's partisanship.
Visiting teams are forced to endure the discomforts of travel.
Preparation for Monday night's opponent is necessarily limited.
ALL THESE things influenced last night's outcome. Mich-.
igan was sluggish, and the Wolverines were unprepared for
Wisconsin's last-minute strategy which sent guard Bruce Mc-
Cauley to the inside.
The Wolverines are now 10-1 in Crisler Arena, and 6-6 on,
the road. Their three Big Ten road wins are by a combined total
of eight points.
Johnny Orr usually says, "Any win on the road is a good#
one." That's a cliche, but it's true.}
Gal swiumers take
third in conference

adges

edge

cagers,

70 -68

By BILL STIEG over Grote's outstretched hand.
Special To The Daily The shot swished through
MADISON-Wisconsin's Bruce and Michigan called time with
McCauley swished a ten-foot 0:01 remaining on the field-
jump shot with two seconds re- house clock.
maining to give the Badgers a Grote's full-court pass de-
70-68 upset victory over the flected off C.J. Kupec's hands,
Michigan Wolverines last night. and out of bounds as the buzzer
Wisconsin outscored Michigan sounded.
10-2 in the final 6:06 to defeat Michigan took a 66-60 lead on
the Wolverines, who dropped out Grote's three-point play at 6:23,
of second place in the Big Ten but scored only once thereafter.
with a 9-6 conference record. Meanwhile, the Badgers took ad-
McCauley's winning shot came vantage of two Michigan turn-;
after Michigan's 22nd turnover. overs and some mistakes by
The Wolverines tried to stall Blue rebounders to come back.
away nearly two minutes, work- McCoy picked up a loose
ing for the last shot. But at the ball under the boards and
1:12 mark, Steve Grote was dropped it in to make it 66-62.
called for not penetrating the Dale Koehler scored after a
Wisconsin defense. bad Michigan pass, and Mc-
Grote and the entire Mich- Coy canned a hook after Rick
igan team protested that he White fouled trying for an of-
had crossed the hash-mark fensive rebound, tying the
painted on the court for such game at 66-all.
situations, but the referees McCoy's jumper from the cor-
s a w otherwise. Wisconsin ner at 2:33 gave Wisconsin its
controlled the ensuing tip. first lead since the 17:45 mark
Ironically, B a d g e r Marcus of the first half. Grote re-tied
McCoy committed the same vio- the game with a short jumper
lation 24 seconds later, but moments later.
again the home team won the McCoy then missed a long
jump ball, shot. Michigan grabbed the re-
The 6-3 McCauley took the bound, and the controversial
ball with about seven seconds penetration call came next.
left, and drove the left side "I don't understand why
against Grote. McCauley was they called that jump ball,"
near the baseline, but he jump- said Johnny Orr afterwards.
ed high and pushed a soft shot "But that's over-there's noth-
Feisty farmers fall
to Wildcats, 6 7-66'

ing we can do about it. It's ' collided n
a tough loss." j son lost
In the first half, a similar needed f
Wisconsin surge in the last three the gash
minutes reduced Michigan's 38- returnedi
27 lead to just four points, 39-351 half.
at the in t e r m i s s i on. The, o
Badgers' comeback was aided ;l
by a technical foul on Grote
with 1:19 left, and the Wolver- Britt
ines ahead 38-30. Robinson
"I said, Come on' really Kupec
Johnson
nasty," explained Grote, "and Baxter
he took it personally." Grote
Kupec put Michigan in com- White
mand early with four long jump-
ers, but was held to four points Team
in the rest of the contest even Totals

near the basket. John-
a tooth, and White
ive stitches to close
on his forehead. He
in time for the second
-season play?
MICHIGAN
FG FT R F TP
4-10 0-0 4 2 8
2-7 2-2 11 1 6
6-10 0-1 11 3 12
5-9 5-6 1 1 15
4-7 0-0 3; 3 8
5-8 5-7 4 2 15
1-2 2-2 1 2 4
S 0-0 0-0 1 2 0
0-0 0-0 0 1 0
4
27-53 14-18 40 17 68
WISCONSIN
FG FT R FTP.

t h o u g h Wisconsin's Koehler
played nearly all the second
half with four fouls.
"We should have won the
game," said assistant coach
Jim Dutcher. "We had a lot
of chances to put it away, but
we just couldn't come up with
the big play when we needed
it."
Late in the first half, 6-7, 210
White and 6-8, 239 Bob Johnson
Big 10 Standings

McCoy
Pearson
Koehler
McCauley
Cobert
Luchsinger
Paterick
Falk
Johnson
Brey
Team
Totals

8-20
1-9
8-16
3-8
2-6
3-9
0-0
1-3
0-0

0-1
3-4
1-2
4-4
1-2
1-1
0-0
0-0
2-3
0-0

7
8
15
0
0
2
0
3
0
5
42

1
4
4
2
1
3
2
1
1
19

16
5
17
10
7
5
6
0
4
70
70

29-76 12-17

Indiana
Purdue
MICHIGAN
Minnestota
Michigan State
Ohio State
Illinois
Iowa
Wisconsin
Northwestern

Conf.
W L
16 0
10 5
9 6
9 6
8 7
8 8
4 11
4 11
4 11
4 11

All
W L
27 0
15 8
16 7
16 7
15 8
14 12
8 15
7 16
7 16
6 17

AP Photo
MICHIGAN'S JOE JOHNSON attempts a jumpshot against
Wisconsin in their Big Ten contest last night, but the
Badgers' Tim Paterick (15) had other ideas. Paterick blocked
the shot and Wisconsin won the game 70-68, to damage the
Wolverines post-season tournament hopes.
This Week in Sports

WEDNESDAY
WOMAN'S BASKETBALL:
Arbor at Michigan, Crisler
6:30.

Spring3
Arena,

COLLEGE
State at
12:00.

BASKETBALL: Ohio
Indiana on channel 4,1

By PEGGY GIRSHMAN
The Michigan women's swim
team barely missed capturing
second place in the Big Ten
Women's Swimming Champion-
ship last weekend, as their 249
points were topped by Indiana's
250 and MSU's astounding '505
point totals.
Despite the third-place show-
ing, Michigan swimmers Kathy
Knox and Debby Brevitz set six
conference records, with Brevitz
placing first in the 50 and 100
yard breststroke and the 100 and
200 yard . individual medley.
Knox, meanwhile, broke two
conference records in her first
place showings in the 200 and
400 yard freestyle. Knox placed,
second to OSU's star sprinter.
Anne Emmenecker in the 50 and
100 yard freestyle.
"I am really proud as hell
of the way the girls swam,"
Michigan Coach Stu Isaac
stated. "Everyone on the
team, whether they placed or
not, put in their best times
of the season."
Knox's and Brevitz's times
qualified them for the nationals
while establishing eight new:
team records. The women tank-

ers' 200 yard freestyle relay3
team of Knox, Brevitz, Connie
Ortega and Anne Allison also
qualified for the nationals with
a time of 1:42.9.
Also putting in good, place-'
setting performances were
breaststroker Jenny Orr, back-
stroker Robin Orr and divers
Sue Gottlieb and Brenda'
Truitt. The diving, however,
was "a little disappointing,"
Isaac said, "because going
into her last dive Sue was
placed second, then she hit
the board and dropped down
to eighth."
Ortega and Allison swam
s t r o n g in their individualI
events, placing eighth and
twelfth respectively, in the 501
yard freestyle.
On Thursday, the women head
for the Midwest Regional Cham-
pionships at CMU for their last
competition before the nationals.
"We couldn't expect to win on
a couple of good individuals,"
Isaac explained. "We just don't
have the depth of MSU or In-
diana, but I think our team was
great because of ts unity and
its overall performance."

THURSDAY
NHL: Detroit at Boston on channel
50, 6:30.
MEN'S SWIMMING: Big Ten Cham-
pionships at Indiana.
j FRIDAY
HOCKEY: Michigan State at Michi-
gan, Yost Ice Arena, 7:30.
MEN'S SWIMMING: Big Ten
Championships at Indiana.
WRESTLING: Big Ten champion-
ships at Ohio State.
NBA: Detroit at Washington on
channel 50, 7:00.
SATURDAY
MEN'S BASKETBALL: Purdue at
Michigan, Crisier arena, 2:05, on
channel 2.
GYMNASTICS: Michigan at Lndi-
ana State.
HOCKEY: Michigan at Michigan.
State on WCBN Radio, 7:30.
MEN'S SWIMMING: Big Ten
Championships at Indiana.
WRESTLING: Big Ten Champion-
ships at Ohio State.
TRACK: Eastern Michigan Track
Classic at Ypsilanti.
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL: MIVA, wes-
tern Division at Purdue.
SCORES
College Basketball
Florida 66, Kentucky 58
Alabama 73, Georgia 64
Tennessee 109, Mississippi St. 83
Purdue 84, Ohio State 72
Auburn 110, Louisiana St. 94
Vanderbilt 86, Mississippi 80
Oral Roberts 71, Okla. City 67
tH IAV E

SUNDAYI
NHL GAME OF THE WEEK: BostonI
at Chicago on channel 4, 4:00.
NBA GAME OF THE WEEK: Los
Angeles at Washington on channel
2, 12:00.
The To n2'0
By The Associated 1' ess
The Top Twenty, with first-placej
votes in parentheses, season records;
through Sunday, Feb. 23 and total
points.
1. Indiana (47) 26-0 940
2. Maryland ?0-3 798
:3. Louisville ?0-2 633
4. Kentucky 20-3 6301
5. UCLA 20-3 6241
6. Marquette 20-3 470
7. N. Carolina State 19-4 4051
8. Alabama 20-3 379
9. Arizona State 20-3 281
10. Pennsylvania 20-4 195
11. Clemson 15-8 178
12. S. California 16-6 1401
13. Creighton 19-4 116
14. North Carolina 16-7 72
15. Texas-El Paso 18-4 61
16. Notre Dame 16-8 54
17. Oregon State 153-9 52
18. Pan American 21-2 47
19. Arizona 18-5 33I
20. Washington 16-7 30j
Others receiving votes, listed al-
phabetically: Centenary. Cincinnati,
DePaul, Furman, Kansas, LaSalle,I
Memphis State, MICIGAN, Middle
Tennessee. Minnesota, New Mexico1
State, Nevada-Las Vegas, UNC-
Charlotte, Oregon, Purdue, Rutgers,
Stetson, Tennessee, Texas A&M,1
Tulane. Utah State.

By The Associated Press :rIllinois managed to stay close
EVANSTON - Willie Williams until there were 14 minutes left
scored 23 points and Billy Mc- in the game when the Hoosiers
Kinney sank a free throw with blew it wide open. Green col
eight seconds to play last night econd 2alof and Keoints Bnn
to lead Northwestern to a 67-66 finished with 20 while QuinnE
victory over Michigan State in Buckner added 14 for the Hoo-
a Big Ten basketball game. siers.o
The Spartans, hoping for a iers
post-season berth, blew a chance~
to win the game when Benny Boilers cook
White missed a one-and-one WEST LAFAYETTE-Eugene
free throw attempt with three Parker led an evenly paced
seconds to play. Purdue attack with 18 points
Northwestern took command and the Boilermakers downed
in the first half and moved to a Ohio State, 84-72, in Big Ten
36-32 lead at intermission and basketball last night.
the Wildcats boosted the advan- Wayne Walls and Walter Jor-
tage to 48-42 in the second half. dan had 15 each and John Gar-
But the Spartans fought back rett and Bruce Parkinson added
to tie the game at 52-all and 14 apiece.
again at 55-55. The two teams Ohio State, with troubles
had several other ties before keeping its offense in gear, got
McKinney snanped a 66-66 dead- 24 points from Bill Andreas.
lock with his free throw. He Purdue trailed 6-0 at the start
missed his second in a one- of the game, but zoomed back
and-one attempt to oven the with Walls scoring the first
door for the Spartans with eight nine Purdue points and Parker
seconds left. put the Boilermakers ahead to!
White, however, lost his stay at 11-10.
chance to win the game and ----- -- -
Williams recovered the rebound
and was fouled. With one second
ljnft, Williams also missed a WAG N
free throw to end a string of 23
straight from the free throw
line but the game was over. V W tune-up
** *$10 plus parts
MIay or May not 8-6 Mon.-Fri.
CHAMPAIGN - Indiana's top- 1237 ROSEWOOD
ranked and undefeated Hoosiers
showed no ill effects from the 662-2576'
loss of leading scorer Scott May
and got 30 points from Steve between S Industrial
Green to crush Illinois 112-89 Packard
last night in a Big Ten basket-
ball game.
John Laskowski filled in for
May, who suffered a broken
arm against Purdue Saturday
and scored 28 points, 15 in the
first half when the Hoosiers
rolled to a 50-44 lead.

P

= rb orII " " "
PRESENTS
Louis Malle's
MURMER OF
THE HEART
in French, subtitled
TONIGHT, Tues., Feb. 25
7 & 9:30 pm. Aud. A, Angell Hall $1 25
TOMORROW: THE RULING CLASS
Ie ovlnqv

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