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February 11, 1975 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-11

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Page Two-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 1 1, 19°75,

Pagew& HE MCHIAN DILYTuesayFebrary11, 197

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SOVIET JEWRY-Feb. 24-
Demonstration at Power Centert
M I
ISRAELI STUDENT ORGANIZATION would like to meet
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Chess record set

(Continued from Page 1)
are allowed a five-minute break
per hour from this rigorous
routine.
The final lopsided score was
542 games for Feldman a id a'
mere 70 for Beinish. Bob re-
sponded to his devastating de-
feat like he responds to most
things--tongue - in - cheek. 'One
more hour and I may have
caught up," he quipped with
his usual grin.
THE RECORD breakers were
surprisingly alert when the or-
deal was over.
The four day stretch which
began Thursday morning at
9:00 a.m. was more thin just
a marathon. It resembled a
festival.
As Sue Franklin, co-promoter
of the event, put it "it was 1:ke
a chess Woodstock."
THERE WAS a myriad of en-
tertainers, jokers, non-stop bab-
blers, and babysitters. Lunchj
hours drew large crowds of
passersby who stopped iti to
gaze at the two specimens of
human endurance.
Most important, though, were
the unsung heroes. They were
the devoted people who were at
Steve and Bob's beckon call.
They braved the icy weather
night and day to fetch sand-
wiches, drinks and any other
Studying Too Hard?
Free lecture
on Hypnosis
Wed. at 7:30
ANN AR BOR
HYPNOSIS CENTER
611 CHURCH, Suite 30294
761-0440

pleasuresthe players desired.
They are the folks Steve and
Bob referred to as "the oaoy-
sitters."
THE CHIEF babysitters and
devotees were Joe Fucini and
Sue Franklin, promoters of the
marathon.
Like Steve and Bob, they were
motivated by their firm suport
for chess and their deep concern
about its waning popularity.
"I'm v e r y relieved," Joe
sighed when it was all over.1
"It's a good feeling to enter-
tain some 5,000 people."
STEVE, the seven-time State
Junior Chess Champion, plodded
right along during most of the
marathon. As he summed it up,
"I probably played more ser-
lously than normal speed chess
and I tried to play each game
to win."
In fact Steve started the mar-
athon playing so seriously he
felt he had used up much of his
energy early.
In contrast, Bob put on a one-
man comedy show the entire
marathon. Playing the court
jester role, he gave a running
commentary on the position of
his game, his fatigue, press cov-
erage, and anything else that
crossed his mind. The crowd
loved it.
IT WAS his humor that eased
the strain of the situation and
kept the crowd laughing. He
added a levity that no one else
could have provided.
After the record had been
set, his enthusiasm did not
wane.
"One more day . . . one more
day," he urged Steve.
"Naw, I'm going to sleep,"
Steve replied.
MMMMMU

CONTRA
GEO, U'negoti
(Continued from Page 1) 1 port to deserve an agency shop.I
June, and the negotiators spent On October 22, the GEO pre-1
the first several sessions merely sented their economic demands
discussing ground rules for the to the University. The proposal
meetings. The negotiations did called for an average 25 per
not move into full swing until cent salary increase, a waiver
the fall term. of tuition for all GSAs, and a
Throughout the early nego- cost-of-living allowance.-
tiations the University com- THE UNIVERSITY rejected
plained that the GEO was not the package, claiming that the
presenting a comprehensive cost was prohibitive. .Harold
package of demands that could Jacobson, chairman of the Poli-
be evaluated as a whole. This tical Science department and a
led to the first breakdown in University negotiator, claimed
the bargainingslate in Setem- that under the CEO proposal he
ber, when the University refused University would pay four out-
to respond to GEO proposals of-state teaching assistants each
until the union presented their working ten hours a week a
entire non-economic packago. combined salary of $27,000. A
The GEO pledged to do so in full-time professor would earn
early October. only $23,000.
On October 1, the infamous The GEO claimed that tui-
"eight per cent" controversy tion for GSAs is a "tax on em-
interrupted the flow of negotia- ployment," since all GSAs must
tions. Upon receiving their Sep- take classes and therefore must
tember paychecks, GSAs (Grad- pay tuition. The tuition waiver
uate Student Assistants) were was a critical element to the
stunned to find that the checks GEO economic package.
did not include an eight per The parties clashed next on
cent increase which former Vice November 1 over the GEO de-
President for Academic Affairs mand for non-discrimination in
Allan Smith had promised them University hiring practices. Both
during the union's certification sides favored a ban on dis-
drive last February. crimination on the basis of race,
THE PROMISE had been creed, color and age, but the
seen at the time as an attempt University balked on the issues
to "buy off" the union. None- of sexual preference and physi-
theless, union members saw the cal and mental handicap.
promise as binding and were THE UNIVERSITY negotia-
outraged. They immediately fil- tors claimed that while they
ed suit with the Michigan Em- had no philosophical disagree-
ployment Relations Commission ment with these issues, they
(MERC), charging that the Uni- were inappropriate or at least
versity had made the promise difficult to incorporate in a
in an illegal attempt to dis- labor contract.
courage unionization, and that The University presented its
failure to keep the promise economic counter-proposal on
violated state law. November 8. They offered an
But the University claimed eight per cent increase for all
that their position was justified GSAs retroactive to September
because the promise had been 1, 1974, with the condition that
made before the tgion was ac- the offer must be accepted by
tually certified, and therefore December 31.
the eight per centaraise became This offer, which would raise
a negotiable issue when the the minimum full-time salary
CEO gained true union status. for four months to $3,894, re-
THE NEXT conflict came in a mained the essential University
classic example of the agency proposal on economics until
shop dispute-an issue which January.
dates back to the beginning of THE GEO made their first
the labor movement. attempt at a public show of
jAn agency shop clause would strength at a 'mass meeting on
provide that the University de- November 13. The membership
duct a service fee, to be paid to agreed to set a contract dead-
the GEO, from the paychecks line for January 30, and a strike
of all GSAs who are not union vote for January 31 through
members. The fee, which is February 6. That schedule al-
agreed upon by the GEO, could most ran true to its projected
not exceed the amount of union form.
dues. The emotional meeting was
THE UNIVERSITY flatly re- the first sign that the GEO was
jected the offer, claiming that a force to be contended with.
the GEO did not have the sup- Plans were made for a massive
--- - -recruitment drive and an in-
formational picketing campaign.
The membership numbered ap-
j proximately 600.
}i4; I The GEO negotiators reas-
a = serted their adamance on the
HOUSE OF IMPORTS issues on November 19 when
HOME OF AUTHENTIC they walked out of a bargaining

ations

7 TALKS

session, charging that the Uni-
versity was failing to bargain1
in good faith. The University
had told the union that it would
not be responding to the GEO
proposals for a tuition waiver
and cost-of-living allowance.
THE GEO team charged that
this "take-it-or-leave-it" offer
constituted "Boulwarism" - a
practice which has been ruled'
unconstitutional by the U.S.
Stnreme Court.
The University claimed that it
was not guilty of unfair bargain-
ing, saying that its nroposal was
the best that could be offered.
"Listen," said physics profes-
sor and University negotintork
T.'awrence Jones to the CEO
team, "just because you started
with demands out on cloujd nine
doesn't mean we'll reach and
agreement that goes halfway
to cloud nine. We've made an
offer and that's as far as we
can go."
THE UNIVERSTTY'S position
at this time ignited the first
serious intentions thronghout the
union to take the dispute to a
strike. On November 23, sixty
hard-core CEO members pro-
tested thb University's stance on
the steps of the Rackham Build-
ing before the day's bargaining
session and sat in on the meet-
ing.

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
Home Cooking Is Our Specialty

44
V

Breakfast All Day
3 eggs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.05
Ham or Bacon or
Sausage with 3 eggs,
Hash Browns, Toast and
jelly-$1.50
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak,
Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$2.10
FAST AND FRIENDLY SEI
$AiJL

Specials This Week
Beef Stroganoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Home-made Beef Stew
Eaa Rolls
Home-made Soups (Beef.
Barley, Clam Chowder. etc.)
Chili. Vegetable Tempura
(served after 2 p.m.)
Hamburger Steak Dinner--
('/ lb.) ...... $1.89
Spaghetti in Wine Sauce
Beef Curry Rice
Delicious Korean Bar-a Beef
(served after 4 Daily)
RVICE BY MR. AND MRS. LEE
SUN. 9-8
CLOSED MON.
TUES.-SAT. 8-8
769-2288
1313 SO UNIVERSITY
STEVE'S LUNCH

By December the countless
disputes, both major and minor,
forced an impasse in the bar-
gaining, and the parties agreed
to call in a state-appointed me-
diator to resolve the difficulties.
The role of a mediator as
delineated by the Michigan Em-
plovment Relations Commission
(MERC) is to meet individually
with both sides, analyze the is-
sues and sutggest remedies to
the nroblems. The mediator does
not concern himself with the
relative merits and feasibility of
the bargaining positions - he
merely tries to bring the sides
closer by any means possible.
THOUGH the process broxiht;
minor progress on several is-'
sues and clarification of some
others, it was largely unsuccess-
ful, and on January 21 of this
year, mediator Richard Terepin
declared another impasse.
This left the parties with sev-
eral options as the January 30
contract deadline approached.
They could call in a state-
anpointed fact-finder, to whom
both sides would present their
positions and who would then
pronose a non-binding decision
on how to solve the dispute. This
is the next step in negotiations
as provided in the Michigan Em-
ployment Relations Act.
They could also opt for bind-
ing arbitration, which the GEO
suggested. A binding arbitrator
is essentially a fact-finder whose
decision must be acceptead. He
hears the cases of both parties
and then presents a contract
which the parties must agree to,
by law.
THE UNIVERSITY refused
the GEO suggestion of binding
arbitration on the grounds that
fact-finding is the next pre-
scribed step, and because, as
University attorney William
Lemmer put it, "there's no ad-
vantage for either party to,
bind themselves in advance to
somebody else's view of what
you should have in a labor con-
tract."

Kwarted
The GE) reluctantly agreed to
call in a fact-finder, and the
two sides agreed to submit as
the major issues of impasse:
-Economics. Between the
time mediation broke down and
this past weekend when the
parties began closed door ses-
sions, the GEO was demanding
a five per cent ay hike effec-
tive January 1, 1975, and a
further seven per cent bike ef-
fective September 1, 1975 or a
raise equal to that of the faculty
for the same period. This did
not take into accounththe eight
per cent raise which the Univer-
sity granted unconditionally the
day before the contract dead-
line.
IN ADDITION, the union had
softened their tuition demand,
,asking for a $200 fee per term
in lieu of tuition for all GSAs
taking eight or more credit
hours.
The University proposed a
four per cent increase effective
September 1, 1975 or a raise
equal to that of the faculty.
They also offered to freeze the
tuition rate for all GSAs work-
ing ten or more hours per week.
Combined with their eight per
cent raise, the University was
offering a total twelve per cent
increase for 1975-76. In contrast,
the GEO was demanding a total
twenty per cent raise for the
same period.
-AGENCY SHOP.
-Class size. The GEO was
demanding a class size limit of
twentv-five students per section.
-Job security for more than
one term. This would provide
that all graduate employes be
assured of employment for at
least two terms. The University
rejects the proposal in view of
the transient nature of the Uni-
versitycommunity, and main-
tained that a job security clause
is more anrrooriate for a long-
time ernoloymes.
In another passionate mass
meeting on January 30, the CEO
voted to reject the University
nosition, but decided to post-
none a strike vote for a week
to build union strength.
LAST WEEK it became ap-
parent 'hat the week's wait was
worthwhile. Not only did the
union boost its strength to over
1.000 members, the powerful
Teamsters pledged their sup-
port to the GEO, promising to
honor all picket lines.
It is this development which
could lead to the success of a
long strike. Should the GEO
establish picket lines around
dorms, food and supplies de-
livered by Teamster truckers
would be withheld, along with
trucked-in supplies to all class-
room buildings.
Today, as GEO members set
up picket lines across the cam-
pus, the closed-door negotiations
continue shrouded in mystery.
Both sides claim that substan-
tive progress has been made,
but they refuse to comment
further.
It appears at present that
while the parties have moved
closer, a final settlement is at
least several days away. Even
if the parties were to reach a
settlement tonight, a threetday
ratification vote of the total
GEO membership must take
place before the strike will end.

I

4,

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