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September 08, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-08

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sundoy, September 8, 1974

Portugal signs treaty

Superstar Allison
turns on the blues

Fairgoers sample
delicious cuisines

(Continued from Page 1) gime in April.
The whites marched through Fighting in Mozambique is to
the streets of Lourenco Marques I end at midnight, and indepen-
smashing windows and over- dence for the African territory
turning cars. They attacked a will be proclaimed next June
pro-independence newspaper of- 25, the 13th anniversary of the
fice and destroyed three of its founding of the Mozambique
delivery vans. Liberation Front, or Frelimo.

SIX AFRICANSdriv-1
ing through the downtown area
in a car flying a large guerrilla
flag were attacked and almost
lynched. A Portuguese army pa-
trol intervened and forced the
mob to release them.
Later hundreds of whites
drove through the streets blow-
ing their car horns in an anti-
guerrilla demonstration.
At about the same time as
the radio station was taken over
a group of disgruntled whites
entered the central prison in
Lourenco Marques and freed
some 200 members of the DGS
-the disbanded secret police
-who were imprisoned after
last April's coup in Portugal.
MOZAMBIQUE Gov. Ferro
Ribeiro broadcast an appeal for
calm and warned that authori-
ties would not tolerate rioting.
The war in Mozambique killed
thousands on both sides and
helped fuel the coup that ousted
the dictatorial Portuguese re-

UNTIL THEN, a transitional
government made up of a front-
appointed premier, six front-
appointed ministers and three
ministers chosen by the Lisbon
government will rule.
Speaking directly after the
signing, Samora Machel, presi-
dent of Frelimo, declared that
"after 500 years of oppression
and 10 years of armed struggle,
Frelimo has succeed in impos-
ing its rights - Portugal has
recognized its obligation to
transfer power in Mozambique
to Frelimo, the true represen-
tative of all the Mozambican

NO DECISIONS appear to
have been taken yet on the fu-
ture of Machel, the 40-year-old
former nurse who joined the
late Eduardo Mondlane's liber-
ation movement and soon rose
to be its military commander.
He distinguished himself in
the field and opened the mili-
tary offensive against the Por-
tuguese in Mozambique just 10
years ago when he led an infil-
tration of Mozambique from
Tanzania by the first 250 armed
guerrillas.
Members of the Frelimo dele-
gation would not make any com-
ment on the likely Frelimo
nominees for the transitional
government, but Zambian news-
papers claimed that Machel
most likely would not be Mo-
zambique's first premier but
almost certainly its first presi-
dent.

(Continued from Page 1)
"If we had put the thing on'
in Ann Arbor it would have
been a success," Andrews
claimed. "The hassles at the
border are turning a lot of peo-
ple away."
The festival was scheduled for
Windsor when Ann Arbor's City
Council rejected a motion grant-
ing permission for the festival
to be held on its traditional site,
Otis Spahn field on Fuller Rd.
MANY MICHIGAN festival-
goers were denied entrance to
Canada at the border or under-
went extensive searches.
A customs official at the bor-t
der declared, "I think the hot-1
heads, to use that expression,
are getting the message that
we don't want them in our
country."
The Royal Canadian Mounted
Police reported several arrests
for possession of marijuana and,
LSD.I
AT LEAST two arrests for
possession of marijuana and
other drugs were made by po-
lice at the festival site.
Moderate amounts of alcohol
and marijuana were consumed
throughout the festival, and the

sparse crowd stretched across
the grassy slopes of the amphi-
theatre appeared to be enjoying
themselves in an easy, loose
fashion.
The show began with an after-
noon of funky, polyrhythmic
music by various Detroit jazz
groups. One of the Detroit
groups, the Contemporary Jazz
Quartet, accompanied vocalist
Ursula Walker. Walker sang in
a jazzy, at times, quasi-scat,
pop style.
THE AUDIENCE cheer e d
wildly when guitarist, vocalist
and harpist Luther Allison de-
livered a highly charged set of
blues and rock and roll.I
Rainbow was fined an unde-
termined amount for violating
their 11 p.m. curfew last night.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Ford

II

people, OBSERVERS agreed, saying
"The war has ended with vic- that Machel will use the nine
tory for not only the Mozambi- months of transitional govern-
cans but also for the Portu- ment to strengthen Frelimo's
guese people. It was particular- position in Mozambique.
ly a victory for those young However, as head of Frelimo,
army officers who had decided Machel is bound to exercise al-
that they had to overthrow the most absolute power in the gov-
former criminal government ernment, which will carry out
that ruled by terror in Portu- its legislative functions by de-
gal." cree.

Volume LXXXV, No. 4
Sunday, September 8, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the, University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 48106.
Published d a 11 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

Ford nixes
looser
money
(Continued from Page 1)
A consensus of the economists
who participated in a White
House inflation mini-summit on
Thursday suggested moves to
ease the tight money policy,
which is blamed for high in-
terest rates and a scarcity of
credit.
ADMINISTRATION
officials have argued that loos-
er money might increase pro-
ductivity but would also drive
up prices and make inflation
worse.

(Continued from Page 1)
long loaves of real French
bread, difficult to obtain in this
country, arrived from Windsor,
Canada at 1 p.m. yesterday
and promptly disappeared.
ONE WOMAN selling Yugo-
slavian pastry commented, "Ev-
erything is from scratch. I
don't know how to make any-
thing from a box."
When asked to describe the
fair, one student surveyed the
seemingly endless display of
food and shook his head. "I
have an inadequate statistical
sampling to make an intelligent
comment," he said.
The Polish American Con-
gress had one of the larger
booths, offering Polish handi-
crafts and books in addition to
Polish wines, perogi, kielbasa,
and golombki.
Pleased with the large turn-
out, Polcyn said, "It's tremen-
dous to see the varieties and,
similarities in cultures."
ERNEST BEVINS, a festival
organizer asserted, "When
people come here they think,
'My gosh, they're not so differ-
ent from us.' The differences
in cultures seems to fade
away."
People gathered at clusters
of tables whose red and white
checked tablecloths and drip
candles lent a European flavor
to the fair.
Ali Mehran, a student from'
Iran, observed, "This is such
an un-American leisurely kind
of thing. One thing I've missed
here, as opposed to Europe, is
when the weather is good to sit
outside without any cars
around.
He added, "Ann Arbor is the
only city I know in the states
that does this kind of thing."

Situated in the midst of booths
offering exotic fare like In-
dian curry, souvlaki, baklava
and stuffed grape leaves, Dun-
kin Donuts continued to enjoy
a steady trickle of customhers
hungry for ordinary doughnuts
and ice cream.
GASOLINE ONCE
CONSIDEREDUSELESS
CHICAGO (AP) - If waiting
in line for gasoline makes you
lost your sense of humor, try to
remember that the precious
fuel was once considered use-
less.
In fact, until the automobile
came along kerosene was the
major product of oil refineries,
according to World Book En-
cyclopedia. Because it burned
slowly, it was used to li g h t
lamps, heat homes and cook
food. Gasoline, too, -was a re-
finery by-product. Because it
exploded when ignited it was
often dumped into rivers and
creeks for disposal.
(Order
Your
Subscription
Today
764-0558

OCToERo 9-12

V

11111

il

, ~Est,. stand Bs irx
,, }aturdn
Special Movemret by
PATRICK CRE.AN,
Mr. Crean i crrently FoilMascer at
Strailaid t~t Th rsr¢I C.d ancd
\ wasfecing co-h f., tril ry-e

ni

rip 4{ '",~i."x ;,Wn~x bnt~eed alt is a Vveatti a! Michigan {RUii
<; -tayhi "l AN EVENIGi'S FROST"Guest Arbtst.in-Residence

UNIVERSITY THEATRE PROGRAMS ANNOUNCES 4 Distinguished Productions IN THE POWER CENTER MF GGAM

AIKD
MARTIAL ART OF SELF-DEFENSE
Demonstration by TAKASHI KUSHIDA, 7th dan
Sponsored by Aikido Association of the
University of Michigan
Tuesday September 10 4;00
IM Bldg.-State & Hoover-Wrestling Rm.
Coil MIKE TSUCHIDA for further info: 665-4864
FURTHER INFO: 971-4332 OR 763-2771
Aikido is a Japanese art of self-defense that is based on non-
resistance rather than strength. An attack is never stopped;
it is met and guided in a way that causes the attacker to be
throwvn by the force of his own attack.
In addition to throws, Aikido also employs a number of wrist
techniques. Although these techniques are extremely painful
and can drive an aggressor to the ground immediately, they
are not designed to break bones or cause injury. For this
reason, Aikido can be said to be a "kind" form of self-defense.
The word aikido means "method, or way (do) for the Coordi-
nation, or Harmony (al) of Mental Energy, or Spirit (ki)."
Aikido is then harmony of the mind and of the body.
We need not struggle against an opponent's strength. If we
lead his mind, his body will follow. However, to lead an op-
ponent's mind the Aikidoist must be calm and relaxed and in
control of his own mind and body. One of the most valuable
aspects of Aikido is that it trains its students to be relaxed
and in harmony with themselves and with others. These are
things which can be carried into our daily lives and can help
us to be better and more effective people.

TODAY'S STAFF
News: Sara Rimer, Judy Ruskins, Becky Warner
Photo Technician: Pauline Lubens
I

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FOR SUBSCRIBERS
L FuD Season Subscriptioor', -, :1°-
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ORDER NOW and SAVE!
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Morgan Sound Theatre
8-T rack Sound Recording
$40 per hour
Coil 434-2141
STOP BY AND VISIT OUR STUDIO
3691 E. MORGAN RD.
YPSIl.ANTI, MICHIGAN 48197

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Mail to Mendelaeobs Theatre, Ann Arbor,
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Dan Biddle, Editor
Marc Feldman, Sports Editor

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