100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 11, 1974 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, December 11, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Blue
Meriweat
By JOHN KAHLER
Special To The Daily
CARBONDALE, Ill.-The last
time that Johnny Orr brought a
basketball team here, he was a
prep cage star. In those days,
Southern Illinois Normal was a
small teacher's college of about
700 students.,
Today Southern Illinois Uni-
ersity (SIU) boasts an enroll-
ment of 21,500 and an aspiring
asketball program. It is that
basketball team which concerns

confront
her leads Saluki five

U,

oliday challenge
Must play nine vacation games

Salukis by the NIT last spring,
when a 19-9 won-lost record was
not deemed good enough for a
tournament berth.
Foremost among the Salukis
is center Joe C. Meriweather,
a senior who passed up a mil-
lion and a half dollars to play
his final season for coach Paul
Lambert. Meriweather is listed
at 6-11, though Steve Grote, his
teammate on the U.S. National
team this summer, insists that
he's closer to 6-9.

{
I
'
{'
-
1
I

THE LINEUPS
MICHIGAN SO. ILLINOIS
Wayman Britt (6-2) F Corky Abrams (6-6)
Rick White (6-5) F Mack Turner (6-5)
C. J. Kupec (6-8) C Joe Meriweather (6-11)
Joe Johnson (5-10) G Mike Glenn (6-3)
Steve Grote (6-2) G Tim Ricci (6-4)

rr today, as his Michigan Wol- AT WHATEVER height, Joe
erines take on the Salukis at C. is a formidable customer,
:35 Central Standard Time to- averaging 24.7 points and 12 re-
ight (8:35 Eastern Standard bounds per game. But if he
ime). were all SIU had, Johnny Orr
would not be so worried.
THIS IS the first time a Big
en school has ventured into Meriweather's chief supnort
arbondale, and the Salukis comes from his backcourt, a I
(named after an Egyptian dog) unit ably manned by 6-3 sopho-
ill be looking to take advant- more Mike Glenn and 6-4 senior
of the opportunity. Tim Ricci. Glenn was named
ge th a bpn y. to a freshman All-America team
Thoughi SIU has been major-, last season, and has smooth
college for six years now, its e5aso , and a 2
asketball program has never moves, a soft touch, and a is
uite shaken the "small school" points/game average. Ricci is
tag. People here still smart primarily a "bomber."
from the rejection slipped the Manning one forward will be:
Defenseman Shand to
join junior pro ranks
By BRIAN DEMING
Conspicuously missing from Michigan's hockey team
lineup next semester may be sophomore defenseman Dave
Shand.
Shand has apparently decided to leave Michigan over
Christmas break to join the Peterborough Petes, a Junior
A team of the Ontario Major League.
Citing no real personal or financial reasons for
leaving the Wolverines, Shand Indicated that he simply
wants to "try something new."
"I think I've learned a lot at Michigan," remarked
the Portage La Prairie, Manitoba native. However, he
added that he had no regrets about leaving. 1
Coach Dan Farrell declined to comment about the still
unofficial move.
According to Coach Roger Neilson of the Peterborough
club, Shand expressed a desire to play with the Petes.
"It was mentioned that he might join us in January,"
Neilson said. "I've only talked to him once this yea'r, and
that's as far as the negotiations have gone.
"At the start of last year we asked Dave out," Neilson
continued. "He was our first draft pick. If he wants to
play for us we certainly won't turn him down."
Shand, who has not scored a goal in 12 games this
season but has earned six assists, did not play in last
weekend's series against Notre Dame. Farrell would
not indicate his playing status for this weekend's series
against Michigan State.
Enrolled in LS&A, Shand played 34 games as a fresh-
man for the Wolverines last year. He scored two goals and
had 10 assists.
Before coming to Michigan, Shand was voted outstand-
ing defenseman in the Metro Toronto Junior League and
played with the Toronto Nationals.
If the 6-1, 185-pound defenseman decides to go to
Peterborough, a city just northeast of Toronto, he will
probably be replaced in Farrell's six-man defensive align-
ment by freshman John McCahill.
ANTI-FREEZE SALE !
from $291 to Calif.
from $249 to Florida
from $249 to Bahamas
TRAVEL WORLD-,994-0244
Refer to classified travel section for more information
You Need High Character
and Dependability for
A High Paying Position
We hove more demand for students who
have our Culinary Arts course than we can fill.
We recently turned away a man willing to pay
$35,000 starting annual salary for a graduate
of our school for a position in restaurant man-
agement. We had no one to fill the position.

Corky Abrams, a 6-6 sopho-
more. Campy Russell scored
29 points on Abrams in his var-
sity debut last year, and Corky
is looking for revenge.
The other forward is Mack
Turner, a 6-5 JC-transfer. His
main claim to fame so fhr is
that he's the kid brother of fer-
mer Minnesota player Clyde
Turner.
THE SALUKIS are 3-1 on the
year, after destroying Missonri
Western last Monday night, '-
64. In that game, they tnrew a
press at their hapless foes, and:
the result was 30 turnovers.
Their only loss was to Vnrder-
bilt.
SIU feels that the key to the
game will be whether C.J. Ku-s
pec can hit from the ogside.
If he can't, Meriweather will
be free to camp under tne
basket and control the defen-
sive boards. If Meriwe :ther is
forced to follow Kupac outslde,
the Salukis can be had.
T h e Wolverines, currently
ranked 16th in the nation, heed-
this win on the road to a spellh
all remaining doubt tlat they
can carry on without Campy
Russell. They feel if the; can
hold SIU to 70 points or iesz, a
victory will be assured.{
The flight down dere in a
Wright C h a r t e r ;-rop-piane
(dubbed the "Flying School-
bus") was bad enough. But a
ride back in that same plane
after a defeat would be unbear-
able. The team is determined
to avoid that.LeJoe
SPORTS OF
Gymnasts sixth

By JEFF SCHILLER
The Michigan roundballers en-
counter no less than six non-
conference opponents and three
league foes between today's end
of classes and the beginning of
the winter term.
And you thought it was a four
week vacation.
Coach Johnny Orr's charges
will f a c e several nationally
ranked contingents, and a num-
ber of others which fall just
short of that distinction. The
Wolverines need a successful
holiday season to maintain their
confidence and it may be im-
portant as a talking point for
securing a post-season tourna-
ment berth.
Orr could go on forever
explaining the Wolverines' dif-
ficulties.
"EVERY TEAM we play is
really good," he claims, "South-
ern Illinois and Dayton are
perennially strong, and they're
both almost impossible to beat
at home.
"Our Michigan Invitational
will be the .strongest it has ever
4 been with Virginia Tech, the
NIT champs two years ago,
Pac-8 contender Washington,
and Manhattan-which went to
the NIT last year and returns
all its starters."
"Then it's on to the Motor
City Classic," Orr continues.
"Western Michigan, our first
round opponent, is undefeated
Photo by PAULINE LUBENS and has a good chance of being
so when we meet them. If we
us fort wo beat them, we'll probably playx
HE DAILY
in Invitational

Detroit and they're supposed to;
be one of the best teams :n the
country."
"On January 2nd, we open
the Big Ten season at Illinois,"
the Michigan mentor complain-
ed. "Immediately after that we
come home to play Ohio State
and Indiana.
"By the time we finish all
that," Orr concluded, "we'll
have a good idea of the caliber
of basketball that Micigan
fans expect us to produce."
VICTORIES ARE must com-
modities. This year's NCAA
tournament has expanded from
25 to 32 teams, and conf.i ence
runner-ups will be eligible. With
the tough Big Ten schedule
sure to blemish each team's
record several times, confer-
ence schools must fatten up on
pre-season foes if they don't
win the title but hope to receive
an at-large invitation or a bid
to the NIT.
The games will also be used
as proving grounds for some of
Michigan's younger players.
The newcomers have performed
well thus far, but their efforts
have been limited to Crisler
A r e n a performances.
One key to the Wolverines'
performance will be their abil-
ity to combat their opponents'
superior height. The reo>n)ad-
ing of players like 6-11 Joe Mer-
iweather of Southern Illinois and
6-10 Kent Benson must 1+e r.eu-
tralized for Michigan to be a
contender.
ANOTHER factor is whet:er
the Wolverines can maintain a
field goal percentage in excess
of S0 per cent, a rate which
would virtually solve the height
problem. No one expects. Way-
man Britt to continue making
two of every three shots, but
a return to shooting form by

their first three Big Ten games
to be regarded as Big Ten title
contenders, and hopes to re-
turn from vacation with a* least
a 6-3 mark for the next nine
games.
"The advantage tf this new
schedule (conference round rob-
in) is also paradoxically its big-
gest problem," Orr said. "Theo-
retically, a team which ;owes
early has time to come back
and win the title.
"But those early losses may
also destroy morale," Orr said,
"because the players s t a r t
thinking of the long disappoint-
ing season left to be played."
The cagers do not lack in-
centive. Though they are a
squad with four starters re-
turning from a sixth place na-
tional finish, the team must
still prove itself to a horde of
skeptics.
But that shouldn't prove an
impossibility. Not even at a
"football school."

Daily
pOI
TJ

SCORES
I NBA
liouston 111, Golden State 97
Buffalo 101, Philadelphia 91 6
New York 106, K.C.-Omaha 102
Boston 107, Chicago 89
Milwaukee 90, Detroit 82
NHL
N.Y. Islanders 3, St. Louis 2
Montreal 5, Minnesota 3
Boston 6, Kansas City 2
Montreal 5, Minnesota 3
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Bowling Green 103, E. Mich. 82
Maryland 104, Georgetown 71
Oral Roberts 89, Hofstra 72
GOOD LUCK
ON EXAMS
UM STYLISTS
at the UNION
Dave, Chet, Harold

In its first competition of the
season, the Michigan gymnas-
tics team finished sixth out of
eighteen teams at the Windy
City Invitational held in Chi-
cago last weekend.
The Wolverine tumblers were
plagued by injuries. Floor spe-
cialist Randy Sakamoto stayed
on the sidelines, while Jean
Gagnon competed only in the
vaulting exercises.
Vaulting provided Michigan's
bright spot Friday night. Rich-
ard Bigras, Harley Danner and
Bob Darden finished second,
fourth and sixth, respectively.
On the high bar, Bob Creek
finished third, and Darden took

fourth.
Danner placed seventh in the.
all-around, while Joe Neuens-
wander managed a seventh in
the rings.
Indiana State finished first in
the team competition, followed
by Iowa State, Southern Illinois,
Nebraska, Illinois State, and
the Wolverines.
The next challenge for the
gymnasts is the Big Ten Invi-
tational, sly-d for January 10
in Crisler Aina.
Hirsch inducted
NEW YORK UP) - Ten new
members were inducted into the
College Football Hall of Fame

last night.
The new inductees are the
late Harry Agganis, Boston Uni-
versity quarterback; John Fer-
raro, Southern California ta-kle;
Elrov "Crazy Legs" Hirsch, a
halfback at Wisconsin a n d
Michigan; the I a t e Barton
Koch, Baylor g ,ard: Mal Kut-
ner, Texas end-halfback-tackle.
Also: Jim Parker, Ohio State
lineman; Barney Poole, an end
at Mississippi, North Carolina
and at West Point; Marchy Sch-
wartz, Notre Dame quarter-
back-halfback; Billy Vessels,
Oklahoma halfback; and Bill
Murray, coach at Delaware and
Duke.

C.J. Kupec
Fighting Artichokes? could maket
Nearly three years of student ize.
protests, lawsuits and haggling err thinks
ended yesterday when the aoti- roes must xi
choke was recognized as the
official mascot of Scottsdalef
Community College. f

and Steve Grote
this hope mater~al-j
that the Wolver-
vin at least two of

Students twice selected the
artichoke, but college officials
voided the symbol elections,
contending they were not offi-
cial and did not reflect s*,ident
body consensus.
No mention was made of
sanctioning pink with white lace
as the school colors.

Y-op-

thiVs

0

ap~e records

appe records

ALL

ON
SALE!

I II\I'A'1964 PRICES T
b I
The BEATLES
2 RECORD SETS ?
THE BEATLES sale
ABBEY ROAD runs
tr
SGT PEPPIR hr
Dec. 21
$ 5.49
PAUL McCARTNEY Walsan Bk ,
JOHN LENNON
1z9!V I
x

ODAY'!

t
f.
'"
x

$6. blue sec.

$5.50 gold sec.

UAC CONCERT CO-OP presents
"THE DOOBIE BROS."

Tickets on sale in the Michigan Union Lobby.
(10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.)
ARTISTS and CRAFTSMEN GUILD
3rd Annual
WINTER ART FAIR

SAT., DEC. 14
CRISL ER ARENA
Special guest stars "Ross"

8 p.m.

SUN., DEC. 15

12:30-6:30 p.m.

MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
AUCTION, 4:30 P.M.

g' 4! { t]t' '
' 'I Q I T;y:f.# J 7ff 6
?a:
:RW%

PER DISC
PER TAPE !!!

i

f t
.
1 A i V r
7i O .~
.. \ F

FUTURE WORLDS
Speakers next term include
Werner von Braun,
Gene Roddenberry,
Al Hithmar
Jessica Tuckman
and more.
Call 763-1107 for more information.
NEW PROGRAMS
UAC will be sponsoring several new en-
tertainment programs next semester,
the nature of which will be developed
by student volunteers.
Anyone interested in coordinating a
UAC program, or just helping out, is
encouraged to call Bob at UAC (763-
1107, or leave your name and phone
number with Jane (763-1107).

f

.1*

RG0 STARR
Oo0dn

JOHN LENNON
Imagine

These positions run from $9,000 to
per year starting salaries. There are
mately 250,000 food service openings

$30,000
approxi-
yearly.

Text materials ured are written for the Am-
erican Culinary Federation Education Institute.
Tuition: $2,500 per year for one and two-year
programs, leading to Diploma Culinaire. Com-

"L
rioJ r
r,.rr..\i

L~-~ __

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan