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December 11, 1974 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-12-11

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, December 11, 1974',

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, December 11, 1974

k.
BARBER, BILLIARDS,
and BOWLING
open reg ular hours
Buring studY and exams
Michga n Union
: SO YOU'RE LEAVING TOWN ,
Are ya gonna find 'em when you get there?
PLAY
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FROSH WILSON TAKES PLUNGE:

Diver

excels

in

cl

By ED LANGE1
If an athlete's performance
under pressure is the key to his
success, then Wolverine fresh-
man diver Curt Wilson has a
brilliant future.
Against Illinois, in only his
second college meet, Wilson
came up with clutch second-
place performances on the one-
and three-meter boards to
squeeze Michigan past the Illi-
ni, 63-60.
"I DIDN'T really get seri-
ous about diving until high
school," claims Wilson, a na-
tive of Rolling Hills, California.
His mother, a former diver, en-
couraged the entire family to
dive, and he began formal les-
sons at age eleven under Lyle
Draves, who later became his
high school coach.
Wilson's outstanding career
at Rolling Hills High School in-
cluded a fourth place in the
state meet during his freshman
year, two consecutive first place
finishes, and a slip to second in
his senior year.
HE ALSO played high school
basketball for three years be-
fore schedule conflicts ended his
cage career.
For the past two summers,

i

Curt dove in AAU competition, ishes behind teammate Don
taking the 17-18 years age Craine to give the Wolverines
bracket championship on the their victory margin.
one- and three-meter boards "We needed that first and
last summer. second," stressed swimming
He had an off night against coach Gus Stager. "That's four-
Purdue last Friday, which teen points for us right there."
coach Dick Kimball blames on "Wilson competed well against
inexperience. "We found out I Illinois when it counted," add-
just how tough it is to dive in ed Kimball. "There was a lot
the Big Ten, especially in the of pressure on him."
away meets," Kimball said. "I NEED a lot of work on
"The adjustment to a different my boardwork and more consis-
board is really tough." tency," Wilson said in the aft-.
THE ILLINOIS meet, how- ernoon of his clutch effort. Kim-
ever, was a different story. ball states that "with a little
Curt came through with two more strength, he could be as
badly needed second-place fin- good as anybody," but stresses

utch
that Wilson needs to work on
tougher optional dives.
He's still in a battle for the
third starting diving spot. Jim
Black, nominally fourth behind
Craine, Dick Quint and Wilson,
has worked out impressively,
and should keep pushing the
others all year.
Michigan's swimmers enter-
tain tough Princeton this Satur-
day at 3:00 in Matt Mann pool.
The Tigers, coached by former
Wolverine and Olympian Bill
Farley, have enough talented
people to give trouble to the
Maize and Blue.

ATLANTA UNDER FIRE

PIP"c -1 man

tax. probe

What"?
Sip Bacardi
before
you mix it?
Sure. It's surprisingly
dry, not sweet. Light-
bodied, not heavy.
Delightfully smooth.
SAnd so good mixed,
isgot to be good
un-mixed, right?
-1T WAT fry it.
, BACARDIjrum
.19)74 BACARDI IPORTS, INC..
MIAMI, FLA. RUM 80 PROOF

X . l M 1i
ATLANTA (A) - The feder-
al government is attacking an1
important tax shelter used byl
professional sports' owners in a
suit which could have far-
reaching consequences, espe-
cially for football and basket-
ball.
At the heart of the suit is as
practice which has become in-
creasingly common during the
last decade in major team
sports. When someone buys a
team he will allocate most of
the purchase price to player
contracts and then write off
that amount in tax deductions
over several years.
This practice is similar to a
businessman taking tax deduc-:
tions for the depreciation on a
piece of tangible equipment. (In
this case the practice is called
amortization, which means tak-
ing tax credits for an intangible
asset such as a contract for a
player's services.)
The value of the practice to a
team owner is amply illustrat-
ed by the case of the Atlanta
Falcons, the team involved in
the suit.
Falcon owners paid $8.5 mil-
lion when the joined the Na-
tional Football League as an
expansion franchise in 1966. In
filing their tax returns, they
said $50,000 was the league's
entry fee, $7.7 million repre-
sented the cost of 42 players

chosen from existing teams and
the rest was interest payments.
It was to their advantage to
allocate most of the price to
player contracts because they
could be written off on tax re-
turns. The price of membership
in the league could not be de-
ducted because it is for an in-
definite time and does not lose
value as a player does.
During each of their first
two seasons, the Falcons took
in several hundred thousand
dollars more than they paid
out, meaning they would be
The Top 20

.

au u

1. N.(
2. UC
3. In
4. Lo
5. MIa
6. So'
7. Ma
8. N.
9. Ka
10. Ala
11. No'
12. Pe
13. S.
14. Me
15. Pu
16. MI
17. Ar
18. Or
(ti
19. Ok
20. Pr

By The Associated Press
C. State (39) 4-0
LA (3) 4-0
diana (4) 3-0
uisville (3) 2-0
ryland 3-n
uthern Cal 3-0
arquette 2-0
Carolina 3-0
nsas 3-1
abamna 2-0
tre Dame 3-0
nn 3-0
Carolina 1-1
emphis St. 2-0
rdue 2-1
CHIGAN 2-0
izona 3-0
egon 3-0
e) DAILY LIBELS 2-0
lahoma 2-1
ovidence 2-0

936
862
734'
598
543
435
361
356
319
271
232
192
156
78
67
'64
47
27
26,

expected to pay taxes on their
profits. But after subtracting
nearly $1.5 million each year
for amortization of players,
the owners reported losses of
$506,329 the first year and
$581,047 the second, and thus
did not pay taxes.
It is these kinds of tax deduc-
tions which have made profes-
sional sports attractive to men
with other business interests.
Benjamin A. Okner, an econ-
omist with the Brookings In-
stitution who has studied pro-
fessional sports, said a victory
for the government could have
substantial impact.
"It obviously would change
the prospective rate of return
of sports teams and I think it
would have a large downward
influence on the value of exis-
ing teams," he said.
By eliminating a tax shelter
which makes some teams
good investments even when
they lose money, Okner said it
woild limit future expansion
to franchises which genuinely
can product reasonable pro-
fits.
If it were to happen that only
those franchises which could
turn a profit could exist, there
coluld be major changes in pro
sports - ones which likely
would mean less teams.
U.S. District Court Judge
Frank Hooper heard testimony
in the case in October. He is
not expected to rule before Jan-
uary and, in the likely event
of appeals, a final decision
may be years away.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
now in stock
SR50
FULL SCIENTIFIC
CALCULATOR
$134.95
UNIVERSITY CELLAR
769-7940

CATCH UPON YOUR SOCIOLOGY
\ Y
-LAI
There's something about
an Amtrak train ride that
brings people closer and makes
everybody a little more sociable.
Maybe it's because for a couple of
hours you can forget the hassles
N "~- of the world outside and just relax ~
in a good, comfortable coach seat.
Maybe it's the close-tip view of the
t! /scenery you get from Amtrak's
picture windows. You'll be surprised
p /how different everything looks when
/ k you don't have to watch out for other
cars.
Or maybe it's the fact you can
get up whenever you feel
like it, and grab a little
something to eat or drink
at the snack bar or a lot to eat-
at low prices in a dining car.-
And speaking of low prices, Amtrak fares
are still very reasonable by today's inflation-
ridden standards. Not as cheap as hitchhiking
perhaps, but a lot less than flying. And when
= l.you buy a long-distance ticket, you can get

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
OF JERUSALEM
1975/76 PROGRAMS
FOR AMERICAN STUDENTS
" ONE YEAR PROGRAM-for college sophomores and juniors.
FRESHMAN YEAR-of 4-year program to B.A., B.Sc. degrees.
" REGULAR STUDIES-for college transfer students toward
B.A. and B.Sc. degrees.
" GRADUATE STUDIES-Master's and Doctoral programs.
a SUMMER COURSES-given in English.
-' For Application and Information. wrire:
Office of Academic"Affairs,
American Friends of The Hebrew University,
East 69 Sr., New York, N. Y. 10021 (212) 9888400
Name
tAddress

PROF. HERBERT H. PAPER
1088 Frieze Bldg.

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Last winter Wes Wolverine got stuck out in the cold.
This winter Wes moved into UTA and is only 2 blocks to
campus.
4 month winter term single

liability

leases

I

i

11

I

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