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December 05, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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Africa to hold
biracial talks

Tunisia may OK PLO
trial of, hijackers

JOHANNESBURG, South Af-
rica WP)-A historic summit
meeting between leaders of
black- and white-ruled Africa
appeared yesterday to be im-
minent amid speculation that
detente in southern Africa is
near.
The South African press re-
ported widely that the first
step toward settling the impasse
between the white minority and
the black majority in Rhodesia
may be taken in Lusaka, Zam-
bia, by the weekend.
THE JOHANNESBURG Star
said it was not known whether
South African officials would be
present at the talks to break the
Rhodesian deadlock which has
been the biggest barrier to co-
operation between Pretoria and
black Africa.
The Star said a break-through
on Rhodesia could lead to the
following six-point program for
Ethiopian
corruption
trial stalled
ADDIS ABABA (UPI) - The
armed forces postponed a mass
corruption trial of former Ethio-
pian leaders yesterday, but
tightened the military's grip on
the jittery capital.
A spokesperson for the mili-
tary regime said the trial,
scheduled to begin yesterday in
the bomb-damaged capital, was
postponed to an undiscbsed
date.
THE ARMED forces held
about 140 former leaders seiz-
ed during the gradual fall from
power of deposed Emperor
Haile Selassie. The military re-
gime announced the executions
last month of 60 ex-officials for
corruption.
The ruling Military Council
imposed a 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. cur-
few on the capital in response
to two bomb blasts Monday end
a threatened explosion Tuesday.
Authorities reported detaining
eight persons in connection with
the bombings, which damaged
city hall and the Wabe Shebelle
Hotel.
Suspects in custody included
a former land reform official,
six army officers and the hotel's
former manager, a government
spokesperson said.

detente:
" A settlement of Rhodesia's
internal conflict between the
minority whites, who now gov-
Sern, and black nationalists.
S A British-Rhodesian agree-
ment, ending a dispute dating
from 1965, when the white-
minority government declared
independence rather than accept
British demands that blacks ?
eventually be allowed to vote.
About 95 per cent of Rhodesia's
nearly six million population is
black and only five per cent is
of European origin.-
" An end to African guerrilla.
attacks against Rhodesia.
" Withdrawal of South Afri-
can police from Rhodesia, which
borders white-ruled South Af-
rica.
* A new political deal for
South-West Africa with its 760,-
000 people, 85 per cent black.
South Africa administers the LAURANCE ROCKEFELLER'
territory under an old League" where he disclosed another lo.
of Nations mandate. The United was made to William Miller in
Nations ended the mandate in tional Convention. The hearings
1966 but South Africa has re-'
fused to recognize the action.
* The chance of more normal!
relations between South Africa
an bakSttesAfithpovooc-y 's
at the United Nations. The se-
cret summit meeting on Rho-.
desia's future is scheduled to 70 70

By The Associated Press
An informed guerrilla source
said yesterday that Tunisia has
changed its mind and will let
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization (PLO) try the four gun-
men who hijacked a British air-
liner and killed a West German
:{..passenger.
In another development, the
Arab newspaper Al Hayat quot-
ed Saudi Arabia's defense min-
ister, Prince Sultan bin Abdul
Aziz, as saying his country has
concluded an $860 million deal
with France to improve the
Sauditank corps and is shopping
in the United States for o t h e r
arms.
THE HIJACKERS were mem-
bers of a dissident Palestinian
faction that hijacked the plane
with 47 persons aboard in the
AP Photo Persian Gulf shiekdom of Du-
STIFIES before the House Judiciary Committee yesterday, bai 10 days ago. They surrend-
made on behalf of his brother Nelson. The $30,000 loan ered to Tunisian authorities last
1 while he (Miller) was chairperson of the Republican Na- week after receiving a promise
e expected to be completed by the end of the week. they would not be handed over
rother discloses newI

to the PLO, which condemned sion currently in the

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their action.
If the PLO actually tries the
hijackers it will be the first such
tribunal ever held. Palestinian
guerrillas, including the eight
who killed two American diplo-
mats and a Belgian envoy in
Khartoum, Sudan last year,
have been handed over to the
PLO in Cairo, but never haveI
come to trial.
The guerrilla source, a mem-
ber of the PLO in Cairo, said
Tunisian President Habib Bour-
guiba and other officials had:
been persuaded to change their
minds on refusing to release the
four hijackers. Tunisian officials
had no immediate comment.
LAST WEEKEND Bourguiba
was quoted as saying he thought
the best solution was "to keep
them here in Tunisia. Besides
we promised them not to put
them on trial. They trust us and
we have to keep our promises.
It is a human problem and not
a problem of sanctions.:rihey
will stay in Tunisia until the
situation changes."
The Palestinian source did not
say whether or how the situa-J
tion had changed.
The informant said a member
of the PLO executive committee
who took part in the negotia-
tions that led to the hijackers
freeing the plane and personsj
aboard, would go to Tunisia tol
take custody of the guerrilas.
IN RIYADH, diplomatic sourc-
es said the Saudis went to the
French for tanks after the Unit-
ed States, previously the chief
arms supplier to Saudi Arabia,
refused to sell them its newest
model tank, the M60. It was
not known what the Saudi mis-1

States is seeking.
On Israel's front with Syria,
military sources reported t h e
Israelis have finished building
a line of fortifications across
the Golan .Heights. The Jerusa-
lem Post said the fortifications
cost $50 million and a "massive
effort" was made to camplete
the defenses before winter set
in.
In Damascus, Syria's govern-
ment-controlled newspapers te-
jected President Ford's concept
of a step-by-step approach to
settle the Middle East conflict.
"This represents a U.S.-Zionist
attempt to undermine Ara, so-
lidarity by offering partial
agreements instead of an over-
all settlement," said Al Baath,
paper of the ruling So c i a i s t
Baath party.
Which
Bacard
for cola?

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begin today in Lusaka, the Star
said.
THE SOUTH African Press
Association said in a-report from
Salisbury that talks began yes-
terday in Lusaka between gov-
ernment officials from Rhodesia
and leaders of the African Na-
tional Congress which seeks
majority African rule in that
country.
Two African nationalist lead-
ers in Rhodesia, Joshua Nkomo
and the Rev. Ndabaningi Sit-
hole, both currently in deten-
tion, may also attend the meet-
ing, the Star said.
Seretse Khama, president of
Botswana and one of the key
figures in the negotiations, flew
from Gabarone to Lusaka on
Tuesday to join President Ken-
neth Kaunda of Zambia and
Julius Nyerere of Tanzania, the
Star said.
Prime Minister John Vorster
of South Africa presided yester-
day at a cabinet meeting in Pre-
toria. Vorster is reported to
have made two secret trips into
black Africa in the last two
months and is believed to be a
prime mover in recent develop-
ments.

loan

before

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W A S H I N G T O N (AP) - i he had no direct memory of the
Laurance Rockefeller, brother loan, which was paid back
of vice - presidential nominee in three years by Miller, and
Nelson Rockefeller, yesterday had discovered records of it
disclosed yet another loan made after the Senate hearings were
at Nelson's initiative. completed.
In testimony before the House Chairman Peter Rodino (D-
Judiciary Committee, which is N.J.) of the House committeeI
considering the selection of said Nelson Rockefeller would
Nelson by President Ford for be recalled as a witness today
the nation's number two post, in what he hopes will be the
Laurance said he advanced $30,- final day of hearings. He ten-
000 to William Miller, then na- tatively plans a committee vote
tional Republican chairman, in next Tuesday, the same day of
1961. the confirmation roll call in the
"SINCE I did not know Mr. Senate. R
Miller, and since Nelson did, I The Senate Rules Committee's
can only assume that I loaned report released Tuesday said it
him the money at Nelson's sug- had focused its probe in five
gestion," he said. possible conflict - of - interest
et,heRsakeellerdareas: Rockefeller's vast for-'
Neither Rockefeller had men- tune, his federal taxes, the po-
tioned the Miller loan in the litical contributions of the en-!
earlier Senate hearings, and tire family, his large loans and
Rep. Jerome Waldie (D-Calif.), gifts to associates, and his con-
declared the disclosure "sym- nection with publication of an
bolic of the trouble we've had" unfavorable biography about a
in the investigations. unfavoal bogayb.
"political opponent.

ouse committeej
ing questionable bonds of alle- than $2 million in gifts and loans1
giance which do not measure up himself did not make the Miller
to the proper standards of recti- loan.
tude . . ." Waldie said the transaction,
Laurance Rockefeller said as and the fact it remained un-
he now understands the details known until Tuesday, heighten-
of the Miller loan, it was made ed his concern that the Rocke-
on Sept. 1, 1961, three months feller family used its wealth to
after Miller, a New York con- advance Nelson's political ca-
gressman, became national par- reer.
ty chairman. In 1964 Sen. Barry WALDIE NOTED that Laur-
Goldwater, after defeating ance gave $1.3 niillion to his
Rockefeller in a bruising con- brother's various political cam-
vention battle for the Republi- paigns and that their stepmoth-
can presidential nomination, er put up $11.5 million.
picked Miller as his vice presi- Rockefeller said he shared
dential running mate. Waldie's concern about the size
"ALTHOUGH I have virtual- of such campaign gifts and was
ly no memory of this transac- glad Congress had now put
tion, I can only conclude that: strict limits on contributions.
its purpose was to enable Mr. "I find that immensely in-
Miller to invest in growth se- structive," Waldie said. "You
curities," Rockefeller said. have a very interesting concept
He said he did not know why of ethics. If a thing is legal, it
Nelson, who distributed more is therefore ethical."

Bacardi dark
rum's smooth,
flavor is perfect
with cola or
for use like
whiskey on the
rocks, in high-
balls, Sours,
Manhattans.

BACARDIrum.
The mixable one.

IRFD

Boys

Finest in Bluegrass
At the PRETZEL BELL
Every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday

i

o"t } r. .{}:. : ;: .[;:"}:.:x : i.s i.:-
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
'f,'f,. k'r"' .;er ::{,7f:S $:° ;:: i . . S; :-' "f s .i ::::"y i:}::::}: ">:"T :'y ::% : ::s}

Day Calendar

Multip

Thursday, December 5 loq. R
WUOM: Dr. Phyllis Bodell, Yale, Int'l
"Women in Medicine," 10:05 am. Cafete
Pendleton Arts Information Cen- Mus
ter: Open hearth, "Black Theatre "Jerici
Workshop," Pendleton Ctr., Union, Resi
noon. Choral
Ctr. Japanese Studies: Wm. F. Quad,
Sibley, "Japanese Ghosts," Com- PTP
mons Rm., Lane Hall, noon. Sty of
Humanities: Henryk Skolimow- tre, Fr
ski, "Soleri's Arcologies," 2084 E. Wom
Eng., 2 pm. concer
Electrical, Computer Seminar: er, gu
Marlin Mickle, "The System Theory! 8 pm.
and Applications Program at NSF," Won
2084 E. Eng., 3:30 pm. Pursin3
MHRI: John M. Davis, Illinois 8 pm
State Psychiatric Inst., "The Drug
Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders,"
1057 MHRI, 3:45 pm.
Ctr. Early Childhood Develop-
ment, Education: Samuel Bali,
Educ. Testing Service, "The As-
sessment of Early Cognitive Abili-
ties: Problems in Evaluating the
Impact of Television," Schorling
Aud., SEB, 4 pm.
Economics: Alan Blinder, Prince-
ton, "Simulating the U.S. Income
Distribution,"' 200 Lane Hall, 4 pm.
Physics: Hiroshi Sato, "On the
Charge Asymmetry of the T equal 1

et of A equal 42," P&A Col-
m., 4 pm.
. Night: Greek food, League
ria, 5-7:15 pm.
ket: McLaughlin & Ford's
ho," Mendelssohn, 8 pm.
iential College: "Christmas
I Concert," N. Dining Rm., E.
8 pm.
: Showcase series, Dean's "The
the Blind Pig," Arena Thea-
rieze Bldg., 8 pm.
nen's Cultural Ctr.: Feminist
t, Meg Christian, singer, writ-
itarist, Hussey Rm., League,
nen's Studies Films: Chisolm:
ng the Dream, Aud. C, Angell,

The only way we get the}
truth is by probing, prodding,
and insisting," Waldie said.
LAURANCE Rockefeller said
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 75
Thursday, December 5, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i1 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio):
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area) ; $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-

BUT NONE of those concerns,
it said, proved enough to dis-
qualify the former New York
governor from the vice presi-
dency when weighed against the
totality of his career.
The report noted Rockefeller
was grilled at length "because
of the questionable propriety,
legality and moral aspects of a
pattern of gift-giving and loans
to public officials, and the in-
herent possibility of establish-

POETRY READING
with
RADCLI FFE SQUIRES
reading from his own works

DAVID CAHN and AMANDA BAILEY

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY:

Thurs.,

Dec. 5-7:30 p.m.

GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe

5th annual U-M SKI TEAM

thk 0 1
, o K

fk0**WA

To Jay and Dave
Congratulations!
UM STYLISTS
at the UNION

BUY OR SELL
NEW OR USED ALPINE & X-COUNTRY SKI
EQUIPMENT, CLOTHING, ETC.
WHERE: Former Hockey Coliseum, 721 S. Fifth
at Hill St. near Fingerle Lumber Co.
TO SELL: Bring items to Coliseum on Friday,
Dec. 6, 2-9 p.m.
TO BUY: Come browse in Coliseum on Satur-
day, Dec. 7, 9 a.m.-8 p.m.
INFO cal 668-7323 or 663-4630
Sales commission charged to help support U-M Ski Team

THE LS&A STUDENT GOVERNMENT
WILL HOLD AN ELECTION
DURING REGISTRATION
" 8 full year and I half year positions are open
" All LS&A students are eligible for candidacy
" FILING FORMS can be picked up and should be submitted to
Mrs. Samuelson in S.G.C. chambers, 3rd Floor of the Michigan Union
" DEADLINE is Tuesday, Dec. 10at 5:00 p.m.
" A CANDIDATES' MEETING for all filed candidates will be held
immediately after the deadline 5:00 Dec. 10 in the
LS&A S.G. Office-4001 Michigan Union
AI
*i
20% OFF
SUNRISE
CANDLES
/ refillable
/- burn 80-100 hours
S* "any sizes
Scolorful deligl
L
AN

I
I

DEEP DISH SQUARE PIZZA
- ~
75c OFF
ANY SQUARE PIZZA v
With One Item or More
OFFER GOOD ONERCOUPON
THURS., DEC. 5, '74 PER PIZZA j
ITEMS: Pepperoni, Ham, Bacon, Ground Beef, Fresh
Sausage, Mushrooms, Green Peppers, Onions, Olives,
Anchovies, Pineapple.
on M w- " mY N - -

The Golden Moors Crew
Lord Jeff took this classic pullover and
turned its timeless qualities into the look
of today. Made it full fashioned and
machine washable. Knit it tightly, of 100%
virgin wool, to keep out the cold blast.
Paid close attention to details, like the
husky saddle shoulders. And touched it
with a broad range of heather colors.

I

$18.95

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