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November 27, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

I LJ AAIt ~1I..ANI IAII ~ 7 v~~Jl~u4yI'4JV~IIUI A, n. r

1 rlC MI%-MIUI11V Utt1LT

vveanesaay; ivovemoer / i, -;, r-r

'Depression'

may raise tuition

(Continued from Page 1) 1
progress, such as the graduate
library renovation.-
The cutback would, however,
affect next year's proposed
renovation of central campus
science buildings. It will also
mean a halt to all construction
on the Flint and Dearborn cam-
puses.
AS SERIOUS as the financial
situation is right now, it is
likely to get worse. The gov-
ernor's office has proposed a
four per cent cut in state ap-
propriations for the non-salary
portion of next year's budget.
This will necessitate still fur-
ther University cutbacks. Flem-
ing stated last month that he
saw no way to further trim the
budget - short of faculty cut-
backs or a tuition hike.
In his October letter to Flem-
ing, Governor Milliken indicated!
that "Tuition increases and en-
rollment decreases ae not via-

ble alternatives." Gerald Miller,,
assistant director of the Depart-!
ment of Management and the
Budget for Milliken, yesterday
indicated the governor is still
"strongly opposed to a tuition
hike," a somewhat softor stand!
than previously.
Ts thr
By JEFF DAY
The Graduate Employes Or-
ganization (GEO) threatened the!
University with a second unfair
labor practices suit last night
as the two sides clashed over
which graduate students would
be included in the union.
The University is seeking to!
limit membership to all those
appointed specifically as teach-'
ing, staff and research assist-'
ants - a provision which the
union claims would enable the

THE FINANCIAL

situation increases voted by the leg'sia-

will also likely take a toll on
pay increases requested by4
various groups of Uni iersity
employes. While 'he proposed1
budget cuts do not directly af-
fect salaries, the amount of tIie

ture are bound to be less.
As Saul Hymans of tLe Com-
mittee on the Economic Status
of the Faculty put it, "The
amount of any increase will of
course be hurt to some degree
by the financial situaion."

eaten 'U' with suit

University to do away with the
union by renaming jobs and
paying wages on an hourly ba-
sis.
THE UNION insists that the
University go with a broader
definition. GEO says that un-
less a settlement can be nego-
tiated, they will take the case
to the Michigan Employment
Relations Commission (MERC).
Trr,1 ~r. yr.a.+a - Iln

when the GEO was recognized
as a union, and that it cannot
retreat from that definition.
Each side bases its argument
on a 1974 MERC decision which
made GEO the sole bargaining
agent for graduate employes.
The decision said the union was
to include "all graduate stu-
dent assistants," including TA's,
SA's and RA's.

The University however cl
it is using the definition

Mitchell again denies guilt

aims THE UNION emphasizes the
used part of the order citing "all
graduate student assistants"
and claiming that any graduate
student who assists the educa-
tional process should be includ-
ed.
ind The University, however,
that stresses the particular types of
graduate students named, and
claims that the order was

WASHINGTON (Reuter)-For-
mer Attorney General John
Mitchell said yesterday he' had
flatly rejected plans for the
Watergate break-in and had

t
i

nothing to do with secret cash
payments used to silence the
Watergate burglars.

finger at the witness box
saying, "The testimony is
he started it, your honor."

*f
you
see
news
happen
calY
76-DAILY

' owever, nis testimony at the;meant to include only those.
Watergate cover-up trial of five IN RESPONSE, the normally
former aides to ex-President expressionless Mitchell shouted GEO also claims - on the
Nixon elicited scepticism from into the microphone: "Mr. Neal, basis of a survey done by the
Judge John Sirica as to why that's about the third cheap shot University - that there are
cash payments were ever made you've taken at me, and 1 re- currently at least SO jobs being
to the burglars in the first place. sent it." done by graduate students
The prosecutor had 'van re-' which involve teaching, but are
SIRICA pressed Mitchell, who ferring to earlier testimony from not classified as teaching assist-
testified in his own defense, to former White House counsel
explain what reasons the Nixon John Dean and Jeb Magruder,ansadthrfeaeno
campaigncommittee w o u I d once Mitchell's assistant on the eligible for unionrrepresenta-
have topay any sum "if there campaigncommittee. tion.
were not some obligation to After Sirica asked ques~'ions
these people." for more than half an hour, he THIS is an attempt to keep
Mitchell then told the judge: told prosecutors that even af-er the size and the power of their
"I can't enlighten you, your 30 days of government evidence, union from becoming too great,
honor. I didn't start it. I didn't he didn't understand why the GEO claims.
make the decision. I didn't have money was raised.
akyth t don wi dit" heNeal explained that botl Dean But the University argues that
anything to do with it." and convicted Watergate bur-; these employes are not doing
The unusual exchange brought glar Howard Hunt had sworn work based on degree require-
Assistant Prosecutor J a )n e s that the money was aimed at ments, and as hourly paid em-!
Neal to his feet, pointing his keeping the burglars s i 1e n t ployes, these workers doing
about White House involvement tasksessentially different from
in the June 1972 break-in at
Democratic headquarters in the the type of work done by TA's,
Watergate complex. RA's, and SA's.
(AN

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rl
:
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AP Photo
Dennis Banks and friend
Marlon Braneo, the actor who refused an Oscar for his performance in "The Godfather" to protest unfair treatment of In-
dians in films, chats with American Indian Movement leader Dennis Banks (left) during a reception last night at New York's
Waldorf Astoria Hotel. The gathering, attended by Ethel Kenn edy and other celebrities, was to benefit the American Indian
Devolpment Association.
ABANDONS LOW SPENDING GOALS:
Ford offers n Iew budgt pa

:

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f

TR A

YIAI I 1141

Montezuma*
Tequila Martini
Montez:umo Tequila,
2 ports. Dry Ver-
mouth, 1 part.
Vanilla extract,
2 drops.
Stir with ice. Strain
into chilled cocktail
glass.
OCELOTL
(THE JAGUAR)
symbol for rhe 14rh day
of the ancient Aztec week.

UNIVERSITY THEATRE PROGRAMS
PRESENTS
in the POWER CENTER
TONIGHT AT 8!
William
Shakespeare'sa
Pericles{
featuring
NICHOLAS
PENNELL ..:
Guest Artist
in Residence
Mr. Pennell will repeat his role of the
past two seasons with the Stratford
Festival Theatre of Canada.
Ticket information available at Mendels-
sohn Theatre Building, Mendelssohn ticket
office, phone: (313) 764-0450
POWER CENTER BOX OFFICE OPENS
6 P.M--76-33

(Continued from Page 1) by Ford himself,.who said that still pending.
the economy "is changing fast- his revised spending figures FORD conceded that Congressl
er than we can change the could be increased "possibly by "may find it difficult to agree
budget. $3 billion or more" if the ad- with all my proposals."
ministration's schedule for oil A measure of Congress' re-.
THE NEW Ford budget es- lease sales on the outer con- luctance to go along with all of .x
timates for fiscal 1975 foresee tinental shelf is not met "for Ford's proposed cuts came at!
outlays of $302,2 billion, rev- environmental or other rea- the same time the President+
enues of $293 billion and a defi- sons."
cit of $9.2 billion. :OF THE $4.6 billion in just-
In June estimated spending proposed spending cuts, $1.7 bil- M iners 1k(
was $305.4 billion, receipts $294 lion would come in programs
billion and a deficit of $11.4 administered by the Department
billion. of Health, Education and Wel- (Continued from Page 1)
The uncertain nature of the fare. Other principal reductions, MILLER said the ratification
new figures was emphasized apart from Defense, were: Vet- vote may be held as early as
erans Administration, $1.1 bil- Monday.
lion; Agriculture Department, "We're going to do everything
N $600 million and General Ser- we can" to shorten the ratifica-
vices Administration, $200 mil- tion which the union had earlier
lion. predicted would take eight to
CANADA'S LARGEST SERVICE Ash estimated that if all the ten days, Miller said.
Send now for latest catalog. reductions take effect, the econ- The strike moved into its
Enclose $2.00 to cover re- omy would lose 40,000 to 50,000 third week yesterday and has
turn oostaae. jobs, of which about 3,000 would choked off 70 per cent of the
Campus Representatives represent federal positions that nation's coal supply. More than
Required - Please Write: no longer would be needed. 23,000 workers in the steel and
ESSAY SERVICES railroad industries have been'
57 Soodina Ave., Suite No. 208 Of the $4.6 billion in recom-
Toronto, Ontario, Canada , mended cutbacks, about $2.7 I
(416) 366-6549 billion would require enactment Have a few extra mo
Our research service is sold of legislation transmitted yes-~
for research assistance only j terday or proposed earlier and during
Igthe day? Nee

released his message. The
House Appropriations Commit-
tee rejected Ford's earlier
recommendations to cancel
$455 million for the Rural Elec-
trification Administration and
$85 million for the Agricultural
Conservation Program.
e _ewp act
idled by the walkout already,
and government analysts have
said as many as 400,000 faced
layoffs if the strike last four
weeks.
The council last week rejected
the industry's first proposal and
instructed Miller to return to
tihe bargaining table. Miller said
he won the improvements the
council had requested but after
its latest rejection questioned
the panel's sincerity in obtain-
ing a "good contract for coal
miners."
ments
d

I

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i_

- 11

11

I

Junior Year in Germany

C 1974. 80 Proof Tequ o. Donon Disdess Import Co. New York. New York.
IStep lively Carruthers...
treat's on me.
My faith in ChumlyM
is restored!'
f
P"- i
This Jolly Tiger is a rare breed indeed. At long last your hunt for a super family
restaurant with refreshingly low prices and dozens of delicious food items is over.
BR
BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER SERVED 24 HOURS A DAY (

at FREIBURG
First Informational Meeting
Thurs.-Dec. 5, 1974-8:00 p.m.
East Conference Room-RACKIIAM
All undergraduates interested in attending the
University of Freiburg should attend this meet-
ng.

i

something to occupy your mind?
THEN, tuck a copy of
Crossword Puzzle
under your arm.
Become a Montessori Teacher
SUMMER STUDY, GRADUATE and
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
COLLEGE CREDITS
WRITE FOR BROCHURE
MONTESSORI CENTER OF MICHIGAN
2490 Airport Rd. * Drayton Plains, MI. 48020
313 / 673-0007
American Montessori Society Affiliate
HEALTH SERVICE
THANKSGIVING HOURS
Health Service will be closed Thanksgiving day
and the Friday after (Nov. 28 and 29). Only
the Emergency Clinic will be open on these days
(Thurs. and Fri.) from 8 a.m.-5 p.m..*
(IMPORTANT: The Emerqencv Clnc will close at
5 p.m. Wed., Thurs., and Fri.).

0

1U

JACKETS &
CAR COATS
ALL 25% OFF

'> :,rays
.
<;;
?; ::-.
.i= " ..
ti{# ,
3 t
. ..3.. r > .1
1 r ' r { , F
r i y
4'' ,, St
..:
E ;
r S '
I S
.. ''
a " : .""...._

Wools
Nylons
Poplins
Corduroys
Dress
Shirts
$1.00

The Medical Clinic will be
Saturday, Nov. 30, from
The Emergency Cynic will1
Noon-Midnight on Saturday
Midnight on Sunday.

open as usual on
8 a.m.-12 Noon.
remain open from
and from 10 a.m.-

I

Buy one at
regular price
Get 2nd shirt
of equal value
FOR ONLY
$1.00

For service information during the holiday weekend call:
764-8320, 764-8347 or 764-7396.
Regular service resumes on Monday. Dec. I
*THERE WILL BE A CHARGE FOR ALL SERVICES
DURING THESE TIMES

ii

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