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November 21, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-21

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Thursdoy, Jovember 1; 974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page-Three

Thursday, November 21, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

747

crashes in

NAIROBI (Reuter) - More
than half the number of people
aboard a Boeing 747 which
crashed here yesterday sur-
vived the disaster, the first air
tragedy to befall one of the
huge jumbo jets since they
entered service.
The aircraft of the West Ger-
man airline Lufthansa crashed
and burst into flames at Em-
bakasi Airport soon after take-
off for Johannesburg this morn-
ing with 140 passengers and 17
crew, according to the airline's
latest figure.
A possible 69 people died but
another 96 escaped alive.
"It was a near miracle that
no more people were aboard the

plane, which can carry 340, and
that so many of those who were
came out alive," a Lufthansa
spokesperson said.
The behavior of the crew-and
particularly of American ste-
ward Tom Scott of Los Angeles
-helped a large number of pas-
sengers to flee in the few sec-
onds before the giant jet was
enveloped by flames, airline
officials said.
By last night 55 bodies had
been recovered and six people
still were missing, most prob-
ably dead. Twenty people were
in Nairobi hospitals, but only
two were in critical condition.
Survivors said the plant ap-
parently lost power almost as

Group urges U.S.
to fast today
By The Associated Press
Americans are being urged to fast today as a practical and
symbolic gesture of concern over starvation that threatens to
claim millions of lives this year.
Oxfam-America, the U.S. branch of the British-based Oxford
Famine Relief Committee, is sponsoring the fast. Spokespersons
estimate that at least 200,000 persons will participate, limiting1
themselves to coffee, tea, fruit juice or broth for 24 hours and
donating the money they normally would spend on food to an'
Oxfam fund for the hungry.
United Nations Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim said the
fast "is a welcome example of how inlividuals have a chance
to join together in creating awareness of alarming global food
shortages and in sharing their resources with those in greater
need."
The U. N. Food and Agriculture Organization has estimated
that more than 500 million persons face starvation in over 30
countries.
Several representatives at the recent World Food Conference
in Rome urged Americans to cut their food consumption.
Some people have said that if each American gave up one ham-
burger a week, there would be a saving of 10 million tons of
grain that would not have to be fed to livestock. The grain
would feed 25 million persons in poor countries.
Church groups are sponsoring similar programs. Roman
Catholic officials in New York urged one meatless day a week;
Bishop Francis E. Kearns of the United Methodist Church in
eastern Ohio is asking church members to forego one meal a
week and give the money they save to a fund for Bangladesh
and India; and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Stains1
has a regular program where all members are asked to fast on
the first Sunday of the month and give the monetary saving to
help the needy.
The Oxfam fast gained support on several camouses. Food1
service officials at the University of Montana at Missoula said
stulents may sign up to skip meals already paid for and the
university will then donate the money to Oxfam which has its
U.S. headquarters in Boston.
At Tufts University in Boston, 1,334 students signed up to fast
and will be reimbursed $2.03 each by the school for the food
they don't eat. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is spon-
soring a teach-in panel on the food problem and a mystery
"hunger feast."
The Daily Collegian, the campus newspaper at the Univer-
sity of Massachusetts at Amherst urged students not to use their
meal tickets. The university will pay 75 cents to Oxfam for each1
fasting student and individuals also are being asked to donate $1.1
Rhode Island Lt. Gov. Joseh Garrahy announced yesterday
that he would particiate in the fast. Providence, R.I., Mayor
Humphrey Donnelly signed a proclamation declaring today a
fast day.
Mitch Snyder, 31, and Mary Ellen Hombs, 23, two members
of the Washington, D.C., Community for Nonviolent Action, got a
head start on their fast. Thev began Nov. 16. the last day of the
World Food Conference, and said they "will continue to follow
this path until the develoned nations of the world begin to re-
snond in a serious way to the plight of so many who have so
little."
T)ATT V OFF~TCTAT, RUTIT,TN
Day Calendar Correirition Between Laboratory
Thursday, November 21 sd Vehicle Measurements," 229
WUOM,: Panel discussion, "Poli- w. Eng., 4 pm.
tics & the Media," with Nicholas Blo-engineering: Kechl Sagawa,
Johnson, Sig Michelson, & David Johns Hopkins Med. Sch., "A Model
Halberstam, 10 am. of Heart Muscle by Small Perturba-
Pendleton Arts Information Ctr.: tion Signal," M3330 Med S. I, 4
open hearth, scenes from Musket's! pm.
musical, "Jericho," Pendleton Ctr., Ctr. Near Eastern, N. African
noon. Studies: Ziad Fabel, "Reflections on
MHRI: David Margules, Temple the Philosophical Debate between
U., "Brain Catecholamines, Narcotic a-Ghazali and Averroes," Com-
Addiction, and Obesity," 1057 MHRI, mons Rm., Lane Hall, 4-6 pm.
3:45 pm. Int'l Night: Turkish food, League
Civil Engineering: Hiroyuki Aoy- Cafeteria, 5-7:15 pm.
ama, U. of Tokyo, "Non-linear Dy- CEW: "Refreshing Math Skills,"
namic Analysis of Reinforced Con- 2114 MLB, 7:30 pm.
crete Structures Subject to Earth- Guild House: Poetry reading, Don-
quake," 311 W. Eng., 4 pm. ad Hall, Rochelle Siegel, Larry
Industrial, Operations Seminar: P. Russ, 802 Monroe, 7:30 pm.
N. Blumberg, Ford Motor Co., "Use
of Stimulation to Establish Corre- women's Studies Films: The
lation Between Laboratory and Ve- Black Women; Fear Women, And.
hicie Measurements," 229 w. Eng., C, Angell, 8 pm.
4 pm. Music school: Wi. Hunt, violin,
Industrial, Operations seminar: Recital Hall; Humperdink's opera,
P. N. Blumberg, Ford Motor Co., "Hansel and Gretel, "Mendelssohn;
"Use of Simulation to Establish both events, 8 pm.
Vivaldi, Bonacelli,
Michaelangello,Marconi,
( Bernini, Caruso, Garibaldi,

Machiavelli, Ferrari,
Mussolini, DaVinci .. .
...-ALL ATE SPAGHETTI
you should too at the
Village Bell
EVERY SUNDAYj

Kenya
soon as it was airborne and
began to lost height when it was
about 100 feet off the ground.
The tail section hit a 15-foot-
high road embankment about
600 yards beyond the end of the:
runway, they said.
The rear section broke off,
the left wing tore into the
ground and the plane spun
round. Fire, which started in
the left wing, engulfed the en-
tire plane in about 30 seconds.
"As the plane struck the
ground with its left wing I saw
a tremendous fireball covering
the whole of the wing . . . right
up against the windows," said
Earl Moorhouse, 29, a passen-
ger from Britain.
He said plastic sheeting and
luggage lockers tumbled round
the passengers and filled the
aisles. The light inside the wide-
bodied plane also went out and
made it impossible for the pas-
sengers to see where they were
going.
With the entire left side of the
plane aflame, 21-year-old Ger-
man stewardess Eveline RehmI
managed to get an emergency
door on the right side of the
fuselage open.
She tried to help passengers
down an emergency slide but
was shoved down herself, leav-
ing Tom Scott and passenger
Jurgen Freud of Frankfurt to
get as many people out as they
could.
Freud, his wife and two sons
finally ran away from the flam-
ing wreckage but Freud could
still "see this steward helping_
people out right up to the last
minute.
"In fact I heard later that he
had gone back inside the burn-t
ing plane and managed to getF
an elderly gentleman out who
had been hit on the head in the
row behind us," Freud added.
Terry Partridge, an engineerE
from Sheffield, England, said;
he knew from the angle of take-
off that "it was not on."
"Then it'all happened. Every-f
thing just fell in-the walls,c
roof and the floor. A stewardess
pulled me out of my seat and
shoved me down the chute.
Those girls were magnificent."
In Frankfurt, headquarters of3
the airline, a Lufthansa spokes-
person said the reasons for the
crash were not yet known but
sabotage was not suspected.
Lufthansa press chief Karl
Wingenrot said that radio con-;
versations between the plane
and Nairobi control tower had
not indicated any trouble.
The voice recorder and "black
box" flight recorder had been
retrieved intact.
A team of West German crash
experts, doctors and senior air-
line officials left for Nairobi
late last night. Officials of the
West German Criminal Police
and Civil Aviation Office were in
the groupsandrwould take part
in the crash probe.

WASHINGTON (Reuter)-The
United States yesterday insisted
it had not recognized the Pales-
tinian Liberation Organization
(PLO) as a negotiating party
for a Middle East peace settle-
ment despite earlier indications
of a possible policy change.
"We have accorded no recog-
nition of any kind," assistant
Secretary of State Joseph Sisco
said in a television interview,
"our position remains unchang-
ed."
Sisco-and a state department
spokesperson at a regular press
briefing-sought to allay ques-
tions raised by another TV
interview the assistant secretary
gave earlier this week in which
he said "we regard the PLO
as the overall umbrella organ-
ization of the Palestinians."

"We also believe, in order to
achieve any durable kind of
peace, the legitimate interests
of the Palestinians have to be
taken into account," he said in
an interview with the U.S. In-
formation Agency for showing'
overseas.
Appearing on the NBC "To-
day" program, an interviewer
said his comment about the
umbrella organization seemed
to go further than previously
stated U.S. policy.
"I think that was an unfor-
tunate way to put it," Sisco re-
plied. "Actually what I was
trying to reflect was that the
Arabs consider the PLO as the
umbrella organization.."
Diplomatic sources said the
Israeli embassy had asked for
a clarification of Sisco's re-

mark and apparently was satis-
fied with yesterday morning's
explanation.
However, it was not imme-
diately clear whether the USIA
interview would be edited be-
fore being sent to U.S. em-
bassies and informationi agen-
cies overseas.
In his "Today" show inter-
view, Sisco, the senior -state
department officer dealing with
Middle East affairs, also said
the speech last week at the
United Nations by PLO leader
Yasser Arafat showed no mod-
erate approach towards a settle-
ment.
"There was no explicit or im-
plicit implication of giving up
terrorism as a matter of policy
.." he said.

U.S. will not recognize
PLO as official party

AP Photo
Hooroo, a great horned owl, thinks people are a soft touch
and is likely to perch on anyone's shoulder looking for a hand-
out. Here he perches on Beth Blastingame of Fairbanks,
Alaska. Although the bird is not in captivity, wildlife officials
theorize that Hooroo was tamed by humans once and then
released.

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DON'T
SPACE OUT,
WASHINGTON
= Is
A Two Way Street
SEE
HANDMADE GOODS
AT
c 1ler~ '.'>+/ _ Vh aadraft1r

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
volume LXXXV, No. 67
Thursday, November 21, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 48106,
Published d a iIly Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area):
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
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Summer session published Tues-
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Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area):; $6.00 local mail
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local mail (other states and foreign)
Join The Daily

Siriten-d
Egg No .
Nice and
Easy.
*a
Nw
Stir 12 oz. Bacardi dark rum into 1 qt.
chilled Borden Egg Nog. Delicious.
BACARDI rum

21S
- -- >. 769,*776O,

Learn Now About the
next CPA Exam.
Becker CPA Review Course
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Course offerings:
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Contact: Mr. Dennis L. Tarr, Dept. D , Temple University,
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GENERAL LAFAYETTE'S
GRAB BAG OF DISCOUNTS
COME IN AND MEET THE GENERALI He'll be at all of our Detroit area stores
with a grab ba full of discounts. Just pull an envelope containing your discount
and apply it to any purchase you wish . . . GET from 10%
UP TO 25% OFF
EXCEPT FAIR TRADED ITEMS, COMBINATION
SYSTEMS AND SALE PRICED MERCHANDISE
NO LAYAWAYS e NO RAINCHECKS 0 NO DEALERS

HONDA

L IVI

YOUR OLD CARTRIDGE IS
WORTH $20 IN TRADE
ON A SHURE HI-TRACK

"Try this one on for size"
1974 HONDA CIVIC
Sedan with 4-cylinder
$2539
Plus dealer prep, transportation & taxes
The 1975 Hondas will not be available until
January. Now you can still buy a 1974
HONDA at very low 1974 prices.
So come in soon and d r i v e the Country's
greateest gas miser. It's what economy cars
started out to be.
WE HAVE MANY MODELS
AVAILABLE FROM WHICH TO SELECT
PAUL C CHAPMAN

Turntable & Cartridge Clinic

SUN., NOV. 24

11 A.M.-5 P.M.

A factory trained representative will be at our store to test your record playinq
equipment and adjust it for best performance-ABSOLUTELY FREE OF CHARGE.
Be sure your turntable and cartridqe are still deliverinq all the performance you
originally paid for and prevent excessive wear to your valuable records.
AND
A TRADE OUT SALE

WE WILL GIVE YOU UP TO 150% OF THE ORION MARKETING
AVERAGE TRADE-IN VALUE ON YOUR OLD STEREO COMPONENTS
APPLIED TO A PURCHASE OF NEW GEAR! CHOOSE YOUR NEW
MENT FROM THE FOREMOST NAME BRANDS!

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. I

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