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October 26, 1974 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-26

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 26, 1974

NO ELECTED REGENTS:

Dean

this is

ELECT

I'

RAE WEAVER

on

WOMEN'S RIGHTS
Men perceive women and women perceive themselves. These
attitudes and percepions are not subject to legislation.'
What is subject to legislation, is the availability of oppor-

tunity. Women must have the same opportunity in
men-education; private industry, government.-LI FE

all areas as

53rd Dist.

Paid Political Ad.
Doug. Crary/Treas.

Rep. St. Rep.

w lq

Study a
(Continued from Page 1)
is an "overriding tendency for
the 'top of the ticket' to carry
the elective educational offices
without regard to any distin-
guishing qualities or lack there-
of of the candidates involved."
Beers said that the political
parties can't necessarily be
trusted to choose the best can-
didates. He stated that Regent
candidates are often selected
near the end of nominating con-
ventions "just to fill the ballot
or to balance the ticket."
BEERS ARGUED that. the
"track record in the state's
schools indicates that the ap-
pointive system is a much bet-
A Reading by
EMERY
GEORGE
Mon., 28th, at 2 p.m.
From his 2 new books
and from his unpub-
lished works
at
OUR PRICES
ARE NOT
SALE PRICES,
THEY'RE
LOWER !
INCLUDING:
"The Whole
Earth Epilog"
The New (vol. 2, in effect)
Whole Earth Catalogue
CASTANEDA'S
"Tales of Power"
529 E. Liberty
9 a.m.-midnight 7 days

ter method of selecting com-
petent people."
At present, members of the
governing boards of this univer-
sity, Michigan State University
and Wayne State University are
elected statewide for eight-year
terms, while the board iem-
bers of all other schools and
colleges are appointed by the
governor, subject to legislative
approval.
The commission's move to en-
dorse the principle of allowing
students to sit on the govern-
ing boards of schools and col-
leges was meant to gain support
of a bill now before the State
Senate, according to Fleming.
THAT MEASURE, which pass-
ed the House in July, would
define there to be "no conflict
of interest involved" in full vot-
ing student Regents.
Last year, State Attorney Gen-
eral Frank Kelley ruled there
was such a conflict of interest,
but University officials, includ-
ing Fleming have argued that
the seating of student Regents
is within the law.
"I see no reason why students
couldn't sit on the board, if the
parties would nominate thsm,"
Fleming said.
THE 30- member governor's

commission also proposed a new
nine-member State Board of
Postsecondary Education to be
appointed by the governor. This
new board would take over the
planning and co-ordination of all
the state's colleges and univer-
sities.
These functions are now han-
dled by the existing eight-mem-
ber State Board of Education,
whose members are now elect-
ed, but who would be appointed
under the new plan. The state'
board would. then be appointed
as well and would handle only
grades K-12.
Beers explained that the com-
mission recommended the post-
secondary board because the
present arrangement between
individual boards and the state
board was not working properly.
Ambiguities in the language
of the 1963 state constitution,
which created the present ar-
rangement, have caused confu-
sion about the powers granted
to individual boards, according
to Beers.
THE STATE board was de-
fined in 1963 as the "general
planning and co-ordinating body
for all public education, includ-
ing higher education" while the

idvises appointed board finishes

constitution also granted auton-
omy to individual school boards.
As a result, the University
filed a suit against the state
board three years ago, claiming
the board had regularly inter-
fered in the "internal affairs"
of the University.
The University recently wont
the case in the Circuit Court of
Appeals and the matter is cur-
rently under review by the State
Supreme Court.
Thetcommission's plan speci-
fies that the new University{
board would have complete con-E
trol over governance and man-
agement. It adds that this pro-
posal will "provide the new,
board with clear direction in
the organization and administra-
tion of its tasks, a facet which
has been lacking in higher edu-
cation involvements of the pres-
ent state board."
In another area, the commis-
sion also recommended that the!
"provision of the state constitu-
*tion requiring presidents of the!
universities to serve as the pre-
siding officers of their respec-
tive governing boards should be1
eliminated."
The new plan calls fir the
boards to determine who should
preside.

testifying
WASHINGTON (Reuter) -
Judge John Sirica yesterday
ended the fourth week of the
Watergate cover-up trial by tell-
ing the government's star wit-
ness, John Dean, to "get off
this witness stand as fast as you
can.
As former White House lawyer
Dean finished nearly two weeks
of testimonyagainst five other
ex-Nixon aides, Sirica jokingly
told him, "Get out of this court-
room before some lawyer thinks
of another question to ask you."
SHORTLY after, Dean left, a
broad smile across his normal-
ly placid face, and the jury re-
turned to their hotel.
Lawyers immediately began
to dicker over the government's
next witness, convicted Water-
gate burglar Howard Hunt.
Defense lawyers protested that
government prosecutor James
Neal had refused to give enough
advance warning so they could
prenare their case.
NOT SO, Neal said. "We give
them thousands of pages of tes-
timony months in advance and
they give us all they have on
the back of a matchbox."
At that, Sirica adjourned the
trial until Monday.
Dean, the 36-year-old star gov-
ernment witness r e f u s e d to
hudge from his version of the
Watergate scandal despite re-
peated attacks on his honesty
and integrity by lawyers for the
five former top Nixon aides
ancls~d of the cover-up.
DURING 'almost a week of
intense cross-examination, their
lawyers have portrayed Dean
as a self-serving, scared witness
who took money that did not
belong to him, destroyed evi-
dence and confessed to being
a major figure in the cover-up.
Remaining un ruffled throiigh-
out, the now-disbarred lawyer,
with a n e a r l y unbelievable
memory for times, dates, places,
meetings a n d conversations,
stick closely to his damaging
story and implicated each -f the
defendants.
Dean added little to what he
told the Senate Watergate Com-
rnittee in the summer of 3973
when he first named the former
President as a participant in the
scheme.

Chwc/t164P~h £2poice4 ,

WELCOME TO ANN ARBOR
FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill St.--668-9341
(if no answer, 769-3354,
971-4875, 665-2683)
Silent Meeting for Worship-
Sunday, 10-11 a.m.
First Day School, nursery/
high, 10-11 a.m.,
Adult Forum, 11-12.
Potluck every first Sundrv,
Business meeting every third
Sunday after worship.
D a i ly Morning Meditation
(546 Walnut St.), 8:30-9 a.m.
Wednesday Sack Lunch (1073
East Engineering), 12-1 p in.
Worship-sharing Groups (in
homes), Tues. / Wed. / 'Ihurs.
eves.
Friday Evening Family Night
(1420 Hill St.), 7:30-11 p.m-
s t o r i e s, discussions, games,
crafts, singing and dancing for
all ages.
American F r i e n d s Service
Committee (AFSC), 1414 ?-lill
St., 761-8283.
Bail & Prison Reform, 761-
8283, 761-8331.
Friends International Co-op,
1416 Hill St., 761-7435.
Friends L a k e Community,
19,720 Waterloo Rd., Chelsea,
475-8775.
Movement for a New Society
(MNS), 665-6083.
World Peace Tax Fund, Box
1447, Ann Arbor.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 11
662-9928.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
3:00 p.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
* * *

___LUHIAL AL -A"JCXS-

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
10:00 a.m. - Worship Service
and Church School.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Ronald Cary, Campus Minister
502 E. Huron St.
10:00 a.m.-Worship.
11:00 a.m.-Church School.
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.-Amer-
ican Baptist Student Fellowship.
All students welcome.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday: 5 p.m. and midight.
Sunday: 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665-0606
Events This Week:
Sunday, Oct. 27-12:00 noon-
Holy Eucharist with a meal fol-
lowing.
Tuesday, Oct. 29-8:00 p.m.-
Dom Benedict Reid, noted Chris-
tian monastic and Abbot of St.
Gregory's Abbey, will speak.
Wednesday, Oct. 30-4:00 p.m.
-Scripture Study on Genesis 37
through 45: "Joseph, a Practical
Dream."
Fridy, Nov. 1-8:00 p.m.-All
Hallows Party-a gala costume
sock hop.
* * *
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.--Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m. -Morning Prayer
and Sermon.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH, 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders,
John R. Waser, Brewster H.
Gere, Jr.
"Where Christ, Campus and
Community meet"
Worship Services at 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.-Sermon Title: "The
Church With the Golden Roof."

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN,
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and
at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15.
Midweek Worship Wednesday
Evening at 10:00.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Services. Sermon: "A Willing-
ness to Pay the Price." Church
School classes for all ages.
Nursery Care provided.
10:30-11:00 a.m. - FellowshipE
Hour in Wesley Lounge.
Worship Service is broadcast
on WNRS (1290) AM and WNRZ
(103) Fm from 11:00 to noon
each Sunday.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Sunday, Oct. 27:
4:30 p.m.-Trick or Treat for
UNICEF.
7:00 p.m.-Dinner followed by
Halloween Party, Pine Room
and Wesley Lounge.
Monday, Oct. 28:
6:30-8:00 p.m. - Transactional
Analysis Class.
Thursday, Oct. 31:
6:30 p.m.-Grad Community,
dinner and discussion.
* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years; Wednesday, through 6
years.
Reading Room -306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-9 Mon., 10-5 Tues.-Sat.
"The Truth That Heals" -
* *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.in.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.-Church School..
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.

con open
Each year, NSA offers challenging career
opportunities to Liberal Arts majors through
participation in the Professional Qualification
Test. This year, NSA has scheduled the I'QT
for Saturday, November 23. Completion of this
Test by the Liberal Arts major is a prerecquisite
to consideration for NSA employment.
The Career Scene at NSA: The National
Security Agency is the U.S. Government
agency responsible for developing invulner-
able communications systems to transm:it
and receive vital information. As an NSA
professional, you wilt be trained to work
on programs of national importance in t h
areas as:
" Language S a Vic and FarEartci-ni used
as a basic tool of research into a nuimbc'r of
analytical fields
" Libraryinformation Sciencce- tec liiical

o whole

new

word oopportunit...

writing in its broadest sense, including
research, writing, editing, illustrating, layout
and reproduction
" Programming-includes data systCm>s
pro'-ran writing, and development of
nechanical and administrat ive procedures
" Cry ptogr aphv--dcveloping & logical proving
ot new ci vpto- logic concepts
" Research -the gath'ring, analysis, and ie
porting of substantive data
Your specitic ac adcimic major is of secondarv
imaportancc. Of far -greater importlance are
your inielit y, intellectual Curiosity and
perscverance plus a desire to apply thlemi ai
d'signmc'its xlere imaginion is the essential
ual i icaition.
Salaries are supplemientcd by the be'nrus of1
icreer federal employmen.t
Advancement and Career Development -
NSA promoitcs front within, id awards

salary increases as you assume greater
responsibility. NSA also is anxious to
stimulate your professional and intellectual
growth in many ways, including intensive
formal as well as on-the-job training.
Advanced study, if job related, is available,
at any of seven area universities and can be
partially or wholly reimbursed through NSA
fellowships or other assistance programs.
lhe deadline for PQT applications is Novem-
.her 151(for the November 23 test). Pick up a
PQT Bulletin at your Placement Office. It
contains full details and the necessary test
registration form. College Relations Branch,
National Security Agency, Ft. George G.
Meade, Maryland 20755. Attn: M321. An
equal opportunity employer, M/F.

Mc Cord
speaks in
D1earborn
(Continued fromPage 1)
lectures) is still in effect."
But Christofferson added that
McCord would have to obtain
permission from Sirica to re-
verse the action. "If somebody
wanted an interpretation of the
order as to whether it was valid
or invalid, they would have to
make a formal motion before
the court," he said.
Christofferson said McCord
or his counsel had never ap-
proached Sirica about lifting
the order.
THE CLERK said that if it
were found that McCord had
violated "an order of the court,.
he could be declared in con-
tempt."
Christofferson said he did not
know whether Sirica was in-
tending to take any action
against McCord.
Though the lecture may place
McCord at odds with the law,
it wasn't too bad for him finan-
cially. The man who helped
to break open the Watergate
scandal was paid $1300 for his
appearance at Dearborn. The
money will go to help defray
legal expenses.

.--
t
f"
f .J, R
Q
*" i.
Y

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Pastor: Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning

Service.I

;
- _
/ ,

OCTOBER 29, 1974
Starting at 7:30 p.m.
THE CELEBRATED
With 16 Greek Entertainers from Greece
Folk & Modern Greek Dancers, Exotic Belly Dancers,
Bouzouki, Greek Musicians, Singers
Er PEEEJ eA -4 I mefl ELI IJ'

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