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October 11, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-11

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Friday, October 11, 1974 iHEMlCHl(~AN DAILY

Friday, October l If 1974

[HE M ICHILAN DAILY

rage Three

Bo ston mayor

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

raps ro
BOSTON (P) - Mayor Kevin
White said yesterday that Presi-
dent Ford has inflamed resist-
ance to integration. White re-
fused to accept any new busing
plans until the federal govern-
ment protects school children.
Meanwhile, sporadic violence
continued in a black neighbor-
hood as schools completed their
fourth week under an integra-
tion plan ordered by a U. S.
District Court judge.
WHITE said he would not co-
operate with a more extensive
integration program scheduled
to begin next September unless
the federal government spells
out when it will call in troops
and marshals and helps pay for
police protection.
However, the White House
quickly said there will be no
federal help at present.
"There is no reason to send
Corn crop
down 1
Sper cent ,
WASHINGTON (R') - The
1974 corn crop, once counted on
as a powerful hedge against ris-
ing'food prices, will be 16 per
cent less than last year because
of drought last summer and
iller frosts this fall, the Agri-
culture Department said yester-
day.
Based on Oct. 1 surveys, the
corn harvest is expected to to-
tal 4,717,600,000 bushels, down
277 million or 16 per cent from
the September estimate. The
1973 crop was a record of more
than 5.64 billion bushels.
THE SOVBEAN harvest was
estimated at 1,262,352,000 bush-
els, down four per ,cent from
Sept. I indications and 19 per
cent below the record 1973 crop
of nearly 1.57 billion bushels.
As livestock feed ingredients,
corn and soybeans are key raw
materials needed for producing
meat, poultry and dairy pro-
ducts. A smaller supply has
driven up feed prices and has
led to farmers scuttling plans
for expanding inventories of
feedlot cattle, hogs, poultry and
dairy cows.
The department's Crop Re-
porting Board said September
was an "exceptionally cool
month" and that frost was a
key feature.

ra view
federal marshals," said Deputy
White House Press Secretary
John Hushen. "The maintenance
of law and order in Boston is
the job first of city authorities
and secondly of state authori-
ties."
ON WEDNESDAY, President
Ford said at a news conference
that busing "was not the best
solution to quality education in
Boston."
With that remark, White said,
Ford "encouraged false hopes
and fanned the flames of resist-
ance that will almost inevitably
lead to further disruption in
Boston and will endanger the
safety of our school children in
the process."
Hushen turned aside questions
about White's characterization
of Ford's remarks. Earlier,
Press Secretary Ron Nessen
said ."there are no second
thoughts" about Ford's re-
marks, and stated that Ford
"does not consider his answer in
any way to give aid and cor-
fort" to busing opponents.
FOR THE first time yester-
day, 450 state and metropolitan
police patrolled the streets and
schools of South Boston, the
white neighborhood wherecre-
sistance to integration has cen-
tered.
White called in the troopers
on the orders of Judge Arthur
Garrity, who ordered the plan
that required the busing of 18,-
200 children when schools open-
ed Sept. 12.
Plans for the second phase of
Boston school integration are
being drawn up by the school
department.
White said, "I will not further
support implementation of
phase two without greater guar-
antees given to the local au-
thorities by the federal govern-
ment to provide total safety for
the children."
"I reject the criteria that fed-
eral assistance is justified only
when a condition of riot and re-
bellion exists in our streets and
when local authority has col-
lapsed," he said.

Day Calendar
Friday, October 11
WUOM: Dr. Geo. Wald, Harvard
U., presents "Answers" & "A Ques-
tion of Meaning," last 2 talks in
1971 Massey Lecture Series, "-.
Therefore Choose Life," 10 am.
Hosp. Commission for Women
Meeting: W10410 Hosp., noon.
Educ. Media Ctr.: Inside Out,
Schoriing Aud., SEB, noon.
Near East Studies: Dr. Garmal
Mokhtar, Organization of Antiqui-
ties, Egypt, "New Findings in the
Field of Egyptology," Aud. C, An-
gell, 3 pm.
Anatomy: David G. Tubergen,I
"Some Aspects of Cell Mediated!
Immunity," 4804 Med. Sci. II, 3:30
pm.
Ctr. South, Southeast Asia Stu-
dies: Cao Huy Thuan, "A Partici-
pant's View of Hue Politics in the
Early 1960's," Commons Rm., Lane
Hall, 4 pm.
H Botany Seminar: Dr. Andre Jag-
endorf, Cornell U., "Coupling Factor
Conformation ATP Synthesis by
Chloroplasts," 6423, Med. Set. I, 4
pm.
- -
This KOlKBR
$2.50 8$0_
FRI.-SAT.
Warner Bros. Record's
KATE & ANNA
McGARRIGLE
w ROMA BARAN

Gerontology Students' Assoc.:
"How It Looks Out There: A Field
Perspective," Rackham Amph., 8
pm.f
PTP: Cyrano de Bergerac, Power
Ctr., 8 pm.
Music School: "An Evening of
American Songs," Willis Patterson,
bass, Rackham Aud., 8 pm.
Musical Society: Festival Chorus
& Symphony Orchestra, Hill Aud.,
8:30 pm.
Folk Dance Club: Barbour Gym,
8-11 pm.
General Notices
Attention Students: October 18,
1974 (5:00 p.m.) is last date for Fall
term when Registrar's Ofc. will al-
low rfund for 50 per cent Withdraw-
D DalT
u~lJRSt' C6.t1 rRK Rm51
EMN D ROSTNND5S

r -
--
--

get yours at
the game Saturday

-

THE ISRAELi POLH PESTIVAt '74
THE ISRAElI PO K PESTIVAL '"
THE ISRAEUI PHI PESTIVA '74

: F
eo lo

xc,,. ,n r . H

STARRING:
Yalta Yatkonl
FEATURING
The A8iet Ti.o Godi ion The Meet
DATE: Monday, October 28, 1974
TIME: 8:00 P.M.
PLACE: The Power Center for the
Performing Arts
PRICE: $3.50, Student Discount $2.50
Sponsored by the B'nai B'rith Foundation
at the University of Michigan
Ticke.ts available at the B'nai B'rith Foundation,
1429 Hill Street
ISRAELI ART SHOW-6:30 p.m. in the
lobby of Power Center
No phone orders accepted-payment by check or money order.
Limited supply tickets on sale now.

AP Photo
BOSTON MAYOR Kevin White tells reporters yesterday that
he can't cooperate with implementation of further school
integration plans until the city has federal help in guaran-
teeing the safety of the children.

^ -
Adan tersT.ic tOffice
Power Center Box Office
After 6 P.M. 763-3333

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 32
Friday, October 11, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i11 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann

Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);I
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published T'ues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local maill
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

dug

mamrwramwm

singer-songwriter
wrote the "Work Song"
recorded by Maria Muldour
FRI.-SAT.
141 1 illSTRET
1i. s

PETER SELLERS and GEORGE C. SCOTT in
or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Bomb
Directed by STANLEY KUBRICK ("2001, A SPACE ODYSSEY")
TON IGHT!-Friday, Oct. 11-ONLY! 7, 8:45 & 10:30 p.m.
Modern Languages Building, Auditorium 3-$1.25

Lee Marvin and Angie Dickinson in 1967
INT LANK
John Boorman directs this hard-hitting but perceptive portrait of an
anti-hero on a personal vendetta. Cynical, cruel, and crooked Lee Marvin
is left for dead by his friends on Alcatraz Island. He, in turn, pursues them
in a plastic, fantastic Los Angeles. Short: LIQUID JAZZ.
SAT.: Wyler's WUTHERING HEIGHTS
SUN.: Ray's SIMABADDHA-THE TARGET
C INEMA GUILD TONIGHT ARCHITECTURE AUD.
atEMA9U ADm,. 1

"A LIGHT frost hit parts of
five Corn Belt states the morn-
ing of Sept. 3," the report said.
"Subfreezing temperatures on
the morning of the 22nd and
23rd brought the growing sea-
son to an abrupt halt across the
northern half of the Corn Belt."
The 1974 wheat crop was es-
timated at 1,780,594,000 bushels
down 1 per cent from Sept. 1
indications. However, total out-
put was up four per cent from
last year's record harmsest.

EMU
Players Series
PRESENTS
SCHOOL
FOR
SCAN DAL
Fri., Sat., Sun.
Oct. 11-13
Thurs., Fri., Sat.
Oct. 17-19
Quirck Auditorium
487-1221

THIS WEEKEND:

COMING TUESDAY, October 15: Vanesso Redqrave in "THE LOVES ISADORA"-Auditorium
"A", Anqell Hall-7 & 9:30 p.m.

TONIGHT: Festival Chorus and Ann Arbor
Symphony
HILL AUDITORIUM-8:30
FREE ADMISSION, no tickets required
SUNDAY AFTERNOON: Heen Baba,
Dance and Drum Ensemble
from Sri Lanka
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM-2:30
Tickets at $5, $4; $2.50
U1EITVeeSIT.
6M USICAL 8OCET
BURTON TOWER, Ann Arbor Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12 Phone 665-3717

T T"11 ., .. . . . -

I

.................

t'9sl
for

mie

I

HUMPHREY BOGART in
THE BIG SLEEP
(1946)
directed by HOWARD HAWKS
FRIDAY, Oct. 11-7 & 9 P.M.
Room 100, Hutchins Hall, Law School
Law Students-Free, Non - Law-$ F .00
THE LAW SCHOOL FILM SERIES
The School of Joplin Gershwin,
and Broadway
in a
POPS CONCERT
U. of M. Chamber Choir
Ragtime Ensemble

to e
Som

ake

W , I

L

We're Walker Manufacturing.
A division of Tenneco, Inc.
You may not have heard of us
before - but we've been out
here - keeping things quiet
in a big way. Through the
design, manufacture and sale
of automotive accessories for
the original equipment and
replacement markets.
While we've been keeping
noise quiet and air clean for
the automotive industry .. .
we've been making significant
strides. In the last 5 years, we
have expanded over 2 million
square feet in plant space
with additional construction

S

olse
And this expansion is creat-
ing increasing opportunities
to start a career in an envi-
ronment where individual
advancement is uncommonly
swift.
CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS
OCTOBER 18th
ENGI NEERS
I E; ME, EE
ACCOUNTING
MAJORS
Make plans now to meet with
our representative.- Discuss
your objectives. And match
them to our opportunities.
Discover how the Walker

OOLeys

*
i

i
r

TGIF

A

Thank God It's Friday
Today
and every Friday

"

FRIDAY, NOV. 1-8:00 p.m.
HILL AUDITORIUM
---- --------------- ----
I I
ITICKET ORDER No. tickets Amount

pw wwwwww
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15c Hot Dogs
2u5 P.M. WHILE THEY LAST
Live entertainment

career is

in touch with
-today.

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uinder wav nresently.

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