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October 10, 1974 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-10

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Thursday, October 10, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Labor has lead
in poll; British
will vote toda
LONDON (Reuter) - Britain's general election went into its
final day of campaigning yesterday with the Labor Party rated
as firm favorites to stay in power.
But the nation's current political uncertainties left the outcome
of today's balloting for the 635-seat house of commons far
from sure.
BOOKMAKERS and opinion polls alike put Prime Minister
Harold Wilso's Party well out in front. The best odds offered
by bookmakers made Labor a 1-3 favorite.
The latest opinion poll, published in yesterday's Pro-Conserva-
tive Daily Mail, indicated a formidable Labor lead of 14.5 per
cent over the conservatives.
The National Opinion Poll said 45.5 per cent of those inter-
viewed planned to vote Labor and 19.5 per cent Liberal.
BUT OPINION polls have proved wrong in Britain's last two
elections and bookmakers were hedging their bets by offering
even money that neither of the two major parties would win clean
control of parliament.
Wilson, too, fearing election day complacency, warned his
supporters, don't bother about opinion pos. They have been
wrong a few times. We cannot afford drop-outs."
Wilson sought to allay fears in some quarters on Tuesday'
that he was oriented too much toward labor unions. He told
the Times of London that he regarded his so-called social con-
tract - voluntary anti-inflation cooperation between labor and
government-as an effort involving industry as a whole, and
not just the unions.

Mills 'intoxicated'
while driving car

BECAUSE YOU'VE
ACHIEVED
* '.
S.,

WASHINGTON (P) - A man1
identified as House Ways andI
Means Committee Chairman
Wilbur Mills was intoxicated,
and had injuries on his face
when his car was stopped by
Park Police early Monday, a
U. S. Park Police official said
yesterday.
Mills has denied that he wass
involved in the incident.
Larry Krebs, a TV newsman
who filmed the incident said
he saw a man who was Mills
"unless he's got a dead dupli-
cate."
KREBS SAID that as the man
identified as Mills approached'
within camera range a park
policeman took the man by the
arm and said: "Congressman,l
come on. You don't need this
kind of publicity."
But Franklin Arthur, assist-
ant chief of the U. S. Park Po-1
lice, said a man in the car of-1
fered identification at the scene:
showing that he was Mills andI
other witnesses have said they<
saw Mills.
"I think we can assume it!
was Rep. Mills," although the
man in question was not fing-
erprinted, Arthur said.
PARK POLICE said they
stopped a late-model Lincoln
Continental registered in Mills'.
name about 2 a.m. Monday be-
cause it was traveling "at an

unreasonable speed' with its
lights off."
A woman in the car first got
out of the car and laid on the
ground, and later jumped into
a nearby pool, Arthur said.
He said the woman, identified
as Annabella, Battistella, was
"obviously intoxicated." Park
police said earlier she appar-
ently was attempting to com-
mit suicide.
A SPOKESPERSON
at St. Elizabeth's hospital said
Battistella had been admitted
and released Monday after a
psychiatrist interviewed her
and concluded that her jump
into the Tidal Basin had not
been a genuine attempt at sui-
cide.
Battistella, who lives in an
apartment building in Arling-'
ton, did not answer her tele-
phone yesterday afternoon. A
friend, who did not identify her-
self, said Battistella had taken
a sedative and gone to bed
about 1:30 p.m. and did not wish:
to be disturbed.
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DATE: THURS., October 10th; FRI., October 11th
11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
FOLLETT
STATE ST. END OF DIAG

AP Photo
REPRESENTATIVE WILBUR MILLS, chairman of the House
Ways and Means Committee, has not been seen in Washing-
ton since a car in which he was said to be a passenger was
stopped Monday night by police. Officers described Mills
as 'intoxicated.' He denies that he was in the car.

VOTE in SGC Elections
Oct. 15, 16, and 17
CANDIDATES ARE:

IF' RE-ELECTED, he would therefore call in representatives
of the nation's employers for discussions, the Prime Minister
said. je us

Conservative Party leader Edward Heath, meanwhile, 'con-
tinued to clutch at what looked like his last chance of avoid-
ing the defeat suggested by the opinion polls - his pro-
posed three-party coalition. He pledged that,, if elected, he
would bring in the other two main party leaders to hammer out
a policy to beat the national economic crisis.
Most national newspapers used their editorial space yesterday
to advise readers which way to vote.
THE EDITORIALS generally reflected each newspaper's poli-
tical sympathies but the Times, which is independent, came
out for a Conservative-Liberal coalition.
Advising readers to vote for their best local candidate rather
than for the straight party ticket, the Times wrote:
"We hope the outcome may produce a Conservative-Liberal
coalition. Such a government would be European, progressive,
internationalist, unsympathetic to further nationalization and
relatively realistic about inflation."
THE LIBERAL party aspect of the race has been getting more
and more attention in the press.j
The old familiar see-saw between Conservatives and Labor has
given place to a several-sided contest in which the long ne-
glected Liberals are showing a new burst of strength.
Other important contenders for significant space in Parliament
include nationalist groupings from Scotland and Wales, and
the Northern Ireland Unionists. All these have little interest in
mainstream British politics and would probably reserve their
support for the party that promised most for their own regional
causes.

White House staff

SEAT
SGC PRES. & V.P.

WASHINGTON (P) - With:
President Ford exhorting Amer-
icans to adorn their lapels with
the red badge of his economic
crusade, it's now a question of
button, button, who's got the:
button?
The White House began get-,
ting telephone requests for the
emblem even before Ford fin-
ished his economic address to:
Congress Tuesday.
On that occasion he wore one
proudly, declaring that its sim-
ple injunction "WIN" - mean-
ingt Whip Inflation Now - will
be the rallying cry for citizen
participation.
THERE WAS - and remains {
- one problem. Ford's button
is the only one in existence. It's I
a handpainted prototype.
Moreover, the President gave
away his button as he left the
congressional rostrum. William
"Fishbait" Miller, thecolorful
House doorkeeper, asked for it.
Among those who called the
White House Tuesday seeking a
similar button was Sen. Charles

wear one during a morning ap-
pearance yesterday on NBC's
Today show. But there was no,
button.
WHITE HOUSE aides re-
sponded to the emergency by
tracking down Miller and re-
trieving the emblem Ford had
given him. Percy wore it on TV.
Then the White House had to
fetch the much-traveled button
back from Percy so it will be
available for others.
Russell Freeburg, White
House coordinator of the effort
to mobilize popular support for
conserving energy and fighting
inflation, said yesterday that
Ford has authorized the pur-
chase of 100,000 buttons that
will be sent to people who write
the President pledging support
for the citizens program. But it
will be several days before
these buttons, estimated to cost
between $6,000 and $7,000, are
available.
Freeburg said that if more
than 100,000 people write in,
which seems quite possible, the
White House will be hard press-
df' 'f th diiiT d 'P1IPY 1T1[

CANDIDATE
CARL H. SANDBERG
REDDIX D. ALLEN
STEVEN LATOURETTE
TERRENCE W. BUNGE
CAROL GRACE PAPWORTH
JOEL RICHARD STELT
DAVID J. MIKKOLA
G. J. DiGUISEPPE

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DIVISIONAL CONSTITUENCY

Percy, R-Ill., who wanted to e to suppyieeman
ANOTHER CONFUSING factor is the narow margins by which---- --- - - -~-
many candidates won last February. At least 40 seats are held
by margins so slim that slight shifts of local favor could HELD OVER FOR THE 10TH STRAIGHT WEEK
affect the outcome. About 100 more seats are marginal to a H
lesser degree, but still capable of showing swings that could THE
radically alter the composition of Parliament.
DAILYOFFICIAL BULLETIN FINEST IN BLUEGRASS MUSIC
Day Calendar r W8UM Amateur Radio Club: new- a the
Thursday, October 10 comers welcome, Kunzel Rm., Un-
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noon. Law Quad, 8 pm.
Pendelton Arts Info. Ctr.: open
hearth, Sharon Leiter, Lemuel John-
son, tandem poetry reading, Union, THE MICHIGAN DAILY
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UNDERGRADUATE
PROFESSIONAL
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IRVING FREEMAN
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SCHOOL AND COLLEGE CONSTITUENCY

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SCHOOL OF N.R.
LSA

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ROBERT MATTHEWS
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eI iree Sisters
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OCTOBER 17 THROUGH 20
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OCTOBER 31 THROUGH NOVEMBER 3

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