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October 10, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-10

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Po§e Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 10, 1974

PageTwoTHEMICIGANDAIY Tursay, ctoer 0, 9I

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County

board remains

Jacobson's open Thursday and Friday evenings until 9:00 P.M.
Saturday until 5:30 P.M.

plagued by various ills

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o-',N

(Continued from Page 1) 1
made up of 15 part-time mem-
bers each elected from a small
district within the county.
THEY ARE ELECTED every
two years and receive a $6,000
per year salary for attending
twice-monthly board meetings
and numerous committee ses-
sions.
This structure is almost uni-
versally condemned by the
commissioners and other county
officials as out-dated and in-
sufficient to meet the county's
steadily mounting problems.
"For the governing to be well
done," says Commissioner Mer-
ri Lou Murray (D-Ann Arbor),
"there should be full-time
people in charge."
OTHER COMMISSIONERS
support the concept of full-time
board members paid a full-time
salary as an important step to-
ward improving county govern-
ment operations.
"With fewer commissioners1
on the board and each of them
earning a decent salary, we
could eliminate come of the re-
gionalism and get things done
much more expediently," Com-
missioner James Cregar (D-
Ypsilanti) says.
~ - -

1

Regional battles have domi-
nated the board during much ofC
the last two years. Moreover,
the disputes between the Ypsi-
lanti and Ann Arbor factions
have deep-seated roots dating
back many years.
ELECTED TO A majority in
1972, the Democrats were able
to work together for a few
months but eventually split over
provincial interests and person-
al disagreements.I
With the departure of Cre-'
gar - who is not seeking re-I
election - the personality
clashes should be markedly re-

.I

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"When the new county build-
ing comes up it will cause real
problems because it has be-
come a symbol to the Ypsi-
lanti people."
-Commissioner James Cregar
t. i.":i''':?:'":"
duced, according to most com-
missioners. The former board
chairman often found himself
at the focal point of heated
personal or partisan arguments.
But the tensions between the
county's two largest population
centers will continue and quiteI
likely intensify after the new
board officially takes over this
January.
THE CATALYST for - rising
tensions may well be choosing a
site for the new county build-
ing - a decision the upcoming
board will probably have to'
make during its term. When theI
present county building was
constructed in Ann Arbor 18
years ago, the Ypsilanti resi-
dents raised a fuss that has yet
to completely die down.
"When the new county build-
ing comes up it will cause real
problems because it has become
a symbol to the Ypsilanti peo-
ple," Cregar says.
However, the dissension that
has wracked the Democrats
would become a far less critical
factor if the Republicans recap-
ture control of the board-a
real possibility in next month's,
election.
THE DEMOCRATS now hold
only a one seat edge.
At least two Democratic
commissioners on the board
were elected from districts'
thought to be nominally Repub-
lican in make-up. And two
years ago, Democratic voter
turn out was particularly heavy
- especially in student areas
of Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti -
because of George McGovern's
presidential candidacy.
After the political skirmishesj
subside, the board may turn its
attention to alterations in coun-
ty government operations that
many commissioners at least:
verbally support.
WITH THE COUNTY'S cur-
rent budgetary problems, the
commissioners would like to re-
ceive additional state and fed-
eral funds to help support local'
programs including welfare,
health care, and other social
services.
~-

The state orders the county to
maintain certain services such
as the sheriff's department, the
courts, and some social pro-
grams but provides little finan-
cial assistance. County officials
feel that the burden has be-
come too great for local govern-
ment to bear.
"The board just can't run a
good show with Lansing dictat-
ing policy," says leading Re-
publican Commissioner Bent
Nielsen (R-Ann Arbor). "I
would hope the state would
eventually take control of the
welfare process out of our
hands."
C 0 M M ISS IO N E R S
from both parties agree that
the state officials should man-
age and fund the court system
because of increasing costs and
administrative paperwork gen-
erated by that branch of govern-
ment.
"We also desperately want
more state payments for the
wide-range of social services
offered to area citizens," adds
Commissioner Kathy Fojtik (D-
Ann Arbor).
Along with additional state
money, a change in the local
method of funding county gov-
ernment is needed, according to
board members.
CURRENTLY THE c o u n t y
receives most of its revenue
from a relatively fixed property
tax. But this source has not
kept pace with expenditures
swelled by inflation and salary
boosts given county employes
during the past year.
Another major overhaul the
board would like to make, en-
tails turning the now elective
offices of sheriff, county clerk,
treasurer, registrar of deeds,
and others into appointive posi-
tions.
The commissioners believe
that these officials often are
not directly accountable to any-
one involved in county govern-
ment and tend to be political
hacks. -
THESE PROBLEMS, which
the elected department heads
vigirously deny exist, would be
eliminated if the jobs were filled
through board appointments,
according to the commissioners.
To further reduce waste and
inefficiency in government, the
commissioners generally advo-
vate better long - range plan-
ning and a closer look at re-
gional planning in conjunction
with other counties.
"We have to have more co-
ordination with Ypsilanti, Ann
Arbor, and areas outside the
county," Nielsen says.
"ALTHOUGHREGION-
al planning is a very tricky
business." comments Commis-
sioner Elizabeth Taylor (D-Ann
Arbor), "the board has got to
start thinking about it to meet
the problems of continuing
area growth, mass transit, and
waste treatment."

Nobel Peace Prize winner
Sean MacBride, UN high commissioner for South-West
Africa, sits in his office at the UN in New York on Tuesday
after being told he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
Former Japanese Prime Minister Eisaku Sato also received
the award.
SC'last chance-
(Continued from Page 1) offers students a return on their
erate keys will be required to 75-cent SGC assessment by
gain access to ballot boxes dur- promising to sponsor a series
ing the election, Bercovitz says. of festivals. Included in their
However, as yet no plan has platform is a proposal that stu-
been presented to prevent dents with University ID cards
people from voting twice, or would receive concert tickets at
from voting outside of theirz a discount, just' like football
constituency. tickets.
IT TURNS OUT, according to The Neo-Modernaires, in their
Faye, that "a person can vote platform, promise to do some-
as many times , as thev have thing to build "some sort of
ID cards. There is no. ruling unity" among the students. They
against voting by proxy." admit, however, that they are
Another thorn in the side of awaiting the election outcome
SGC is the lack of candidares to before planning anything more
fill all the seats available. A specific than that.
glance at the ballot shows that ANOTHER NEW slate is the
there are more seats available Reform Party. Under Council
in some contests than there are President Sandberg's leader-
candidates running. ship, they plan to continue their
SGC is currently divided into
three constituencies under a troduce various reform meas-
complex "ten-ten-ten" plan de- tre rr
vised by former Council treas-
urer David Schaper. The remaining party is Cam-
THESE constituencies are di- pus Coalition. The oldest party
vided into Residential seats, Di- on campus, it was formerly
visional seats, and School and known as CLAMP (Coalition of
College seats. Liberals and Moderates Party).
The most hopeful aspect of the They are not running a 'candi-
election is that most candidates date for either president or vice
appear to be running serious president but are concentrating
campaigns. winning other Council seats.
This was not always true in ACCORDING TO C a m p u s
the past, when candidates ran Coalition President David :Faye,
on slates with names ranging both his party and the Reform
from the Mad Hatters Tea Party b arty a n th Rorm
to the Bullshit Party. This year, tion with each other.
the strangest party label on the
ballot is the Guess Who Party. Whatever the platforms, it
THE GUESS WHO party gets now appears that campus poli-
its name from the varried poll- tics have taken on a more ser-
tical views held by group mem- ious tone with the possible ex-
bers. However they willingly tinction of SGC drawing night.
agree on "honesty, integrity and As former Council member
the ability to listen." Dave Hornstein says, "the days
The other parties all propose
reform of past SGC practices. of proposing dope co-ops are
The Student Action Coalition over."
Ford's economic plan
gets poor, localrtn

PLEASE PARK IN THE ADJOINING ENCLOSEDI
STREET AUTO RAMP. JACOBSON'S WILL GLADLY
YOUR PARKING TICKET.

MAYNARD
VALIDATE

Use Daily Classifid

I

ii

TOMORROW I

SENATOR GEORGE

S .

innn+.imim form P9Qe 11

i

C

will speak on the
BANKRUPTCY OF REPUBLICAN
ECONOMIC POLICY
Senator McGovern is appearing in behalf of

,
,
F
f
:

"ood-s-Gold" Git Certificates
LUCKY
WINNERS,
100
DOUG BYRUM-Ann Arbor
,50
DICK FLETCHER-Ann Arbor
STEVE WICKENS-E. Lansing

be cut. "There should be more
dollars for public service em-
ployment," he added.
ESCH BELIEVES that infla-'
tion can be whipped only by1
the "cooperative effort of every-
one."
Dr. Daniel Fusfeld, an eco-
nomics professor, doesn't think
that the proposals will have.
much of an effect on infla-
tionary pressures.
"T h e administration view-;
points on the economy areI
wrong," he said. "They don't,

know what they're doing," he
added.
At a "teach-in" last night in
Angell Hall, angry students sug-
gested that President Ford's
'WIN' button should stand for
"Whip. Imperialism Now" in-
stead of the present "Whip In-
flation Now."
Bruce Steinberg, one in a
panel of seven speakers, was
critical of the surcharge. "Take
Nelson Rockefeller who paid no
taxes last year . . . five per
cent of zero is zero," he said.

i

THE ISRAEU POW PESTIVAt '74
THE ISRAELI POH PESTIVAt 'M
THE ISRAEIH POLK PESTIVAt-'74

$25
JERRY POINZON-Ann Arbor
VIC HOWARD-E. Lansing

0

'ou

0

Democratic Candida te for Congress
Hill Aud. -10:30 a.m.

JOY HERBERT-E. Lansing
$10
J. W. RICHARDS, ELLISON D. C}U PER Ill,
JIM WHITE, DAVID CRANE, DEEB HATTEM
$5
PAT McCAULEY, BENJAMIN MARSHALL,
JEFF MYLES, E. M. STACK, TIM WEAVER,
T. F. SPEARMAN, SUSAN KRON,
SUDEE TAORMINA MARY WADE, MIKE WARING

STARRING
Yanfa Yaikon
FEATURI NG
The Adler Trio Godi on The Sobuo:
DATE: Monday, October 28, 1974
TIME: 8:00 P.M.
PLACE: The Power Center for the

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