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October 05, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-05

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 5, 1974

Kelley speaks in city
(Continued from Page 1) utilities declaring that it
rassing for me-considering how standard practice for them
little I make and how high my seek rate hikes which are mo
taxes are." than double their actual need.
He said that members of t
Public Service Commission te
HE emphasized, however, that to have a pro-industry bias, b
he has made available a con- cause "they (PSC member
plete list of his campaign con- frequently quit to go to work I
tributions. the utilities."
Kelley lashed out at public On the subject of consume
protection, Kelley rapped t
State Senate and Governor W
liam Milliken for "bottling u
legislation.
Urging people to vote tor
- peal the sales tax on food a
prescription drugs Kelley stat
D "this is a regressive tax. T
1poor.who buy very little oth
than these items are hit hard
than the rich who can afford

is
to
ore
[.
he
nd
be-
rs)
for
ner
he
vil-
p"
re-
nd
:ed,
he
her
der
lto

Ford seeks tough
inflation eontrols

(Continued from Page 1) I
There were persistent reports i

would seek new taxes to finance
N *-C~LcI,% fnr L11a pUUL nnU Ui1nIiI

buy many other things."

I

IU

MOVING SALE
20% OFF
ALL MERCHANDISE
316 SO. STATE STREET
9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Sat.; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sun.

I IU!.W ,1U JCila1 Li1L L FVli.7Help tor the poor and unem-
that Ford would ask Congress ployed.
to approve an income surtax Congressional approval is re-
for wealthy Americans so that quired for the imposition of
he can start major programs of changes in taxes.
public service jobs for the poor The President appeared to be
and unemployed without in- irked by opinions that he was
creasing the federal budget floundering and that his eco-
deficit. nomic planning was in a state
of chaos.
NESSEN refused to predict Nessen said Ford told the Re-
the policies the President would publican leaders that his pro-
announce, other than to exclude grams were not in a chaotic
proposals for gasoline rationing state-"We do have hard deci-
and an increase in the federal sions to make, but hard deci-
gas tax, now four cents a sions are not equal to chaos."
gallon.
The spokesman said Ford
told the Republican leaders thatto
he was ready to "bite the bul-
.let" and to unfold a strong
<::::: >- <:::: >program including some un
'" pleasant m edi1ci1n e for the r p r
* American people in order to
curb inflation, which is running
at an annual rate of more than
tPreughoudthednettconferred
throughout the day with hison d p
economic advisers, as the La- (Continued from Page 1)
bor Department announced that reached for comment.
unemployment shot up to its DU PONT, a physician, and
highest mark in more than two John Bartels, the government's
years last month with 5,300,000 top drug law enforcement offi-
people out of work. cer, are scheduled to appear
AP Photo Monday before a House health
NESSEN said that Ford had subcommittee, Bucher said.
earmarked substantial funds for DuPont estimates that one in
employment training programs. seven Americans has, used mar-
n D.C. courtroom. He is cur- He added that Ford was ready ijuana and will say that sur-
John Mitchell and four others to go to Congressuwith more prisingly large number of clients
JohnMithel andfou oters proposals if the future unem-I in federally funded treatment
ployment situation justified such programs report a primary
a step. p r o b l e m with marijuana or
He said the President was hashish, according to Bucner.
concerned about inflation, un- He said the statement does
employment and the plunging not represent a Fhift in official
stock market but felt the en- government atitudes toward
tal staY yire economy would improve if "pot" but a recognition of Pew
Congress accepted the program scientific knowledge. "We are
he planned to give it next week. clearly discovering more &d-
On Oct. 29, Nixon's attorneys NISSEN disclosed that some verse effects as the research
will argue a motion in Los An- features in the new economic* matures and is retested ard
geles to quash a subpoena in a program would be mandatory- verified," he said.
Charlotte, N. C. civil case ordered into effect by the Pres- The Department of Health,
which ordered Nixon to make ident himself-and others would Education and Welfare is pre-
a deposition. The attorneys have take the form of a request to paring a report on -narijuana
said that the deposition would Congress for legislation. and health which summarizes
impose an "unreasonable bur- His remark gave rise to re-; the most important recent re-
den" on their ailing client. newed speculation that Ford 1 search, a HEW spokesman said.
? U TA 71_"

-1

ART POSTERS

'Maximin, John speaks
U.S. District Court Judge John Sirica talks to reporters yester day as he leaves his Washingtol
rently engaged in jury selection for the Watergate cover-up tr ial in which former Atty. Gen.J
are defendants.

Albers
Anuszkiewicz
Appel
Beardon
Bonnard
Braqiue
Calder
Chaqall
Dali
Dufy
Ernst
Frankenthaler
Giacometti
Indiana
Johns
Kandinsky
Klimt
Lichtenstein

Centicore Bookshops on May-
nard Street has one of the
largest selections of original art
posters in the United States.
Our sources are in many parts
of the world, and we carry a
large number of posters that
are difficult to find anyplace in
this country.
These posters are created and
executed by the artists, them-
selves, to commemorate exhibi-
tions of their works. Most of
them are original silk-screens
and lithographs; they are not
mere reproductions of paint-
ings. With the passage of time
their value can increase by the
same percentagie as does the
value of other works by the
same artist.

Lindner
Louis
Matisse
Miro
Munch
Mondrian
O'Kee.fe
Oldenberg
Picasso
Pollock
Rockwell
Shahn
Steinberg
Stella
Trova
Vasarelv
Warhol

Eastern Michigan
University
PLAYERS SERIES
presents
Pantomime '7
Ypsilanti igh School
Fri., Oct. 4
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 5
7:00 p.m.
487-1221

PHLEBITIS TREA TMENT:
Nixon ends i

0s pi

(Continued from Page 1) "I AM trying to be nonpoliti-
said. He said Nixon agreed to cal and give you my honest
his doctor's orders. opinion."
Of Nixon's condition, he said, On Thursday, Nixon's law-
"I think after being up all night vers asked U. S. District Court
going to the bathroom, losing .Judge John Sirica to excuse
sleep, having repeated test, I Nixon from testifying in the
would say his condition is worse Watergate coverup trial in
than when he first came in." W ton.cSiricarefuse
Nixon was given enemas be- shgton S reusd t
fore tests to clear his digestive state the motions grounds, but
it was widely believed that they

CENTICORE BOOKSHOPS

336 MAYNARD

I

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Have You Registered to Vote?
October 7 Is the Last Da
for the November 5 Election
For Your Information Regarding Voter Registration
1. All residents of Ann Arbor, not already registered, at least
18 years of age on or before November 5, 1974, should reg-
ister to vote.
2. ADDRESS CHANGE: You are allowed to vote at your previ-
ous voting place once and change your address at the polling
place on election day or you may change your address at reg-
istration places.
3. REGISTRATION TIMES AND PLACES:
MICHIGAN UNION: Monday, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
ANN ARBOR CITY HALL: Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY: (343 S. Fifth Ave.)
Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Sunday, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY: (3042 Creek Drive)
Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday, 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
CUNNINGHAM'S in both Plymouth and Georgetown Malls and
K.MART, 215 North Maple Rd., Monday, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
PAID FOR BY THE COMMITTEE TO ELECT
SHIRLEY BURGOYNE for DISTRICT JUDGE
15th District Court-New Judgeship

tract, a hospital official said. were based on the premise that '
BEFORE his arrival in Long Nixon is too ill to travel. b la ck o rg a n~
Beach, Nixon said he feared
that he would "never come out Asked when Nixon might be
alive" if he entered a hospital. able to give the court a depo- (continued from Page 1) cates with similar
Lungren said that Nixon, who sition, Lumgren said that giving improve the condition of minori- at the University
had on several occasions re- such testimony "would fit into ties at the University," com- campus, Easter
jected physicians' advice to be the area that indicates a period mented Kilkenny. University and M
hospitalized for his phlebitis, of a few weeks should be given The group, the first of its kind University.
said as he left the hospital for him to recuperate from the on the campus, was formed last Kilkenny said ti
"that he will follow out my in- exhaustive hospital regimen." November, but has only be- also concerned wi
structions to the letter." NIXON has been subpoenaed gun to include a large percent-
Lungren said he knew some by both the prosecution and de- June. There are at least 250- e
people doubted that Nixon was f afense, and special prosecutor 300 blacks on the faculty and ate
really ill. "I know there are a Leon Jaworski has asked Sirica staff - and the group plans to
lot of doubting Thomas's - the to send an independent medi- contact all of them.
country is full of them-but this cal team to determine if Nixon ance s
is my honest conception of what is too ill to testify. "So far were in no position
I think should happen to him tonegotiate with the Univer-
during his recovery period. I Lungren said he had not beensity, but we have met with pea-
_____.__receryper._d -contacted by any doctors at the ple in authority and voiced our
-direction of Sirica. athe opinions," explained Robinson. a r~ i
Niton hadrtwo $90-a-day He said that the group had been (Continued fro
influential in hiring several
moms on the hospital's sixth blacks for administrative posi- Neb.) that would
floor, for which he is paying tions in the past year. measure to the Jt
A i. -. - - mttee for hearing

Szaton meets
organizations financial aid to black students
y's Dearborn and trying to lower the high
m Michigan( attrition rate among the black
ichigan State undergraduates.
He argued that "a number
he group was of well-qualified black students
ith expanding! were lost last year because of
extremely late returns of appli-
cations," and other administra-
tive mix-ups.
"If this group is successful,"
said Flowers, "we could serve
as a model for a similar stu-
dents' group."

lent

t'

Jobless

mPage1)
have sent the
.idiciary Coin-

4

4

with presidential
- : funds.
IN ADDITION to
up trial, Nixon faces
problems.
Michig
$2.50 8 0 Free Instru
FRI.-SAT.

transition
the cover-
other legal

THE ASSOCIATION is pres-
ently funded and staffed on a
strictly voluntary basis, and is
not affiliated with any other
group - although it communi-

;an Union Billiards

I

ctions

ADELPHI RECORD'S
PAUL
GEREMIA

Pocket Billiards
For Women
Wednesday 3-5 p.m.

Special Rates
For Couples
Every Tuesday
11 a.m.-12 mid.

O!

COUNTRY BLUES,
SINGER-SONGWRITER
142i Hill STREET
W1KSI

- - -- -- - - -
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre presents
A Musical Farce
based on "The Importance of Being Earnest" by Oscar Wilde
Oct. 9-11,1974 Oct. 12, 1974
8:00 p.m. 7 & 10 p.m.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Tickets $3.50 and $4.50, available at the box office and
Liberty Music Shop

Hruska, with the support of
Scott and Griffin, then sought to
substitute his own bill, which
would have declared that the
official papers of presidents,
vice presidents and members
of Congress are public property.
That failed, 52 to 14, after Sen.
Sam Ervin (D-N.C.) said Hrus-
ka was only attempting to kill
the bill.
"IF I wanted to assist in
hiding the truth from the Amer-
ican people, I'd vote for the
substitute," Ervin said.'
Hruska's final effort was an
amendment simply prohibiting
destruction of the Nixon tapes
and papers without congression-
al approval. Ervin noted this
would not assure the courts or
public full access to the docu-
ments and the amendment was
defeated, 49 to 15.
Hruska and Scott portrayed
the bill as an effort to punish
Nixon without a trial and said
it would violate the former pres-
ident's property rights and
abridge his right to free speech
and privacy.
"If the subject of this bill
were anyone other than Mr.
Nixon, it is highly unlikely that
it would even have gotten out
of committee," Hruska said.
Hruska contended that under
precedents followed by other
presidents, the tapes and papers
are Nixon's property. The bill
does not take a position on who
owns the documents, but guar-
antees that Nixon the courts
and the public will have full
access.

rate hits
2 yr. high
(Continued from Page 1)
William Proxmire (D-Wis.) said
the latest employment figures
look "like a classic recession
pattern," while Sen. Hubert
Humphrey (D-Minn.) said it
annears the nation is slipping
close to a depression. Humphrey
said bold action is needed to
turn the economy around, check
inflation and halt the rise in
unemployment.
HO1WEVER, Commissioner Ju-
li's Shiskin of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics said that con-
trary to east recession periods,
emolovment is continuing to rise
even tho'igh unemployment also
is increasing.
Most of the increase in un-
emoloyment last month occur-
red among women over age 25
and teenagers. Declining col-
lege attendance among young
men, coupled with the slower
growth in jobs, contributed to
rising yonth unemployment, the
government said.
The average work week for
manufacturing employes was
unchanged from August's 40.1
hours while the average factory
overtime declined to 3.1 hours a
week from 3.3 hours.
Average hourly earnings of
factory workers rose 8 cents
from August to $4.51 and were
38 cents above September 1973.
Average weekly pay for factory
workers climbed to $181.75 from
$177.64 in August and from
$169.33 a year ago.
September's unemployment
rate of 5.8 per cent was the
highest since a similar 5.8 per
cent level in April 1972.

L'

.. i,

lilillill

-,

SPECIAL CHILDREN'S
MATINEE!
DONOVAN in
"THE PIED PIPER"
Saturday & Sunday at
1 & 3 P.M.

11, 11

:~ u

The OfigiflI, Uncenseped, ,40l~ed,
Classc of Cameo'g Classics!
I The

Weekend Shows at
1-3-5-7-9 p.m.
Open at 12:45 p.m.
It was the summer of 1942. It
was hot and restless, an in-
between time. On a small
island off the coast, three boys
and a young woman were
waiting for something to hap-
pen.

For almost 50 years, MGM's
musical s t a r s have been
showing the world what en-
tertainment is . . . Tonight,
let them show you!
"THAT'S
'INTEDTA IIJL4PTt'

I NGMAR BE RGMA N'S 1959
A father's (Max Von Sydow) greatest pride, his beautiful untouched
daughter, is brutally raped and murdered, and this film depicts his struggle
to accept that fact through ruthless revenge. Bergman fills the screen

Return of
Captain
Spaulding

HOORAY!

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