100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1974 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, October 3, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, October 3, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

EDGE CUBS IN 10TH:

Bucs

pirate

Eastern

crown

ny
w
dr
in
vi
Ia
LE
sh
S
d
t
o

PITTSBURGH (A) - Man- Thursday, only if the Bucs scored when pinch-hitter Dave
y Sanguillen's infield single had lost last night. Parker grounded to second for
ith one out in the 10th inning The Pirates scored twice in the second out.
ove in the winning run, giv- the ninth inning, the 'second Cubs' starter Rick Reuschel
g the Pittsburgh Pirates a 5-4 run coming when Cubs' catcher then struck pinch-hitter Bob
ctory over the Chicago Cubs Steve Swisher turned a game- Robertson out for the third
st night and the National ending strikeout into a run- out, but Swisher let the ball
eague East Division champion- scoring passed ball, to tie the get by him and Sanguillen
lip. Cubs 4-4.I raced home with the tying
The victory eliminated the Chicago took a 4-2 lead into run.
t. Louis Cardinals from the the bottom of the ninth but
Division race. Pittsburgh walks to Richie Zisk and Man- The Pirates started the 10th
wound up 1 games ahead of ny Sanguillen and a sacrifice against Cub reliever Ken Fran -
he Cards, who were rained bunt by Ed Kirkpatrick put the ing when Al Oliver tripled into
out at Montreal. That game tying run in scoring position. the left field corner with one
would have been played Pinch runner Miguel Dilone F,*,r. ,

GIANT BENEFIT
GARAGE SALE
Ann Ar'bor Amateur Hockey Ass'n
Saturday, Oct. 5-9 a.m.-4 p.m.
1302-06 So. Forest St.
® SPORTS EQUIPMENT
0 HOUSEHOLD GOODS
" GAMES AND TOYS
MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Dept. of Psychiatrv-University of Michigan
THURSDAY SEMINAR
OCTOBER 3, 1974
C. A. A. J. GREEBE
Instituut Voor Perceptie Onderzoek,
The Netherlands, "Recent Perceptual Research
in The Netherlands."
TEA 3:13 P.M., RM. 2059 MHRI
SEMINAR 3:45 P.M., RM. 1057

'
i

Majfor League Standings

out. w Sitlargeiiland pincn
hitter Gene Clines were walked
intentionally and Oscar Zamora
replaced Frailing.

Final Standings
American League
East

x-Baltimore
New York
Boston
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Detroit

w
91
89
84
77
76
72
Nest

L
71
73
78
85
86
90

Pct.
.562
.549
.519
.475
.469
.444

GB
2
7
14
15
19

x-Pittsbui
St. Louis
Philadelpi
Montreal
New York
Chicago

Final Standings
National League
East
W L
rgh 88 74
86 75
hia 80 82
79 82
k 71 91
66 96
West

hr a r ~ ntr~ m. _ ^ iarevD i

Pet. GB
.543 -
.534 1 4
.494 8
.491 8%
.438 17
.407 22

SGC

z' ; :f'xd~
} :
..
i . . .:

x-Oakland 90
Texas 84
Minnesota 8?
Chicago 80
Kansas City 77
Californias t 7
x-won division title

71
84
80
94

AP Photo
THE JUBILANT PITTSBURGH PIRATES rejoiced following their pennant-clinching victory
over the Chicago Cubs last night. The Pirate s won 5-4 on Manny Sanguillen's bases-loaded
infield single in the bottom of the 10th inning. The Bucs will host the Los Angeles Dodgers
Saturday in the opening game of their playoff series.

Yesterday's Game
Baltimore 5, Detroit 4
Texas 2, Minnesota 1
Chicago 5, Kansas City 4,1
Cleveland 8, Boston 6
New York 2, Milwaukee 1
Oakland 2, California 0, in
5 inn.

.559 - x-Los Angeles 102 60 .630 -
6.525 514 Cincinnati 98 64 .605 4
0.506 8!4 Atlanta 88 74 .543 14
.500 9, Houston 81 81 .500 21
.475 13% San Francisco 72 90 .444 30
4 .416 23 San Diego 60 102 .370 42
x-Yvon division title
es Yesterday's Games
San Diego 9, San Francisco 5
Pittsburgh 5, Chicago 4, 10 inn.
12 inn. Atlanta 13, Cincinnati 0
Philadelphia 3, New York 2, 10 inn.
Los Angeles 5, Houston 4, 10 inn.
ic. after St. Louis at Montreal, cancelled,
rain

I

The following offices are open for the Student Government Council elec-
tions for Winter, 1974. Applications for office may be picked up at the
SGC office, 3909 Michigan Union. FILING DEADLINE is 4 p.m. sharp,
October 4th. Filing deadline for party names is also Friday at 4 p.m.

RIVALS SINCE 1902:

Blue,,
By RAY O'HARA
This Saturday in Palo Alto
the gridiron squads of Michigan
and Stanford will collide for
only the eighth time in the
history of the two schools.
Although they have not met
often, their clashes have not
been lacking in either excite-
ment or import. From time to
time they have battled over
Rose Bowl glory, national rank-
ings and regional snobbery us-
ing everything from high school;
cheerleaders to future U.S..
senators as ammunition.
STANFORD and Michigan
first crossed each other's paths
in the 1902 Rose Bowl in a'
game that was shortened eight
minutes by darkness. The lost
time was missed by nobody,
however, as the Maize and Blue
swarmed over the Stanford men,
in a 49-0 rout that supposedly I
pointed up the supremacy of
"Eastern Football."
Despite the deluge of scoring
the Wolverine eleven did not
have an altogether easy time
with their West Coast adver-
saries. The much smaller Stan-

Stanford

meet

I

r.."r- FURTHER frustration greeted The phenomenon of television
an improved Stanford squad in brought the 1952 game to Ann
1949. Western Football was Arbor from Palo Alto but Blue
slowly gaining a better reputa- partisans would have been hap-
tion helped by a combined 98-0 pier if left in the dark.
performance by the Indians in One Stanford touchdown was
two previous contests against set up when Olympic decathlon
NIGHT EDITOR. eastern opposition. They still champion Bob Mathias (later to
FRED UPTON weren't good enough to derail become a Senator) fumbled the
the Michigan express however. ball for the Indians on Michi-
..................... After a see-saw first half in gan's 23. The ball bounced out
rosters and a map of Ann Arbor which the Wolverines gained a of bounds on the 19 for a cru-
to distract the fans. 7-0 lead the Stanford defense cial Stanford first down.
collapsed in the third quarter, Despite fumbling on the Stan-
The game was over quickly I yielding two touchdowns quickly ford three the Maize and Blue
as Michigan struck for four en route to a 27-7 defeat. had managed a 7-7 tie by the
touchdowns in the first eight Stanford became the first fourth quarter only to lose when
minutes, including two long; West Coast team evertto defeat they were called for interfer-
bombs and a reverse by future 1951. ence in the endzone, setting up
coach 'Bump' Elliott. The re- Michigan with a victory in19ah. the Indians' 14-7 triumph.
action of the Michigan crowd In miserable, drizzly weather
aton the Michigas an I the Indians dominated the Wol-
to the blitz was totally unna- verines after spotting them a THE 1972 Rose Bowl was sup-
tural by today's bloodthirsty brief 6-0 lead in the first half. posed to be a mismatch between
standards; they cheered for The only cheering for the undefeated Michigan and a
Stanford to make a game of it Michigan crew amid the sparse loose, unconventional, group of
and thunderous approval greet- home crowd was generated by talented Stanford players.
ed their two scores in the 49-13 over 2,000 high school cheer- Michigan's vaunted running
rout. leaders, imported especially for game was unable to move at
The Wolverines were reward- the occasion by the athletic de- crucial times, however, because I
ed with the top ranking in the partment. Even the "pom-pom the entire Stanford defense was
next poll but succumbed to persons" went home with damp ; keyed against it, ignoring the
powerful Army in their follow- spirits after Michigan's 23-13 pass. Michigan's inability to
ing game and fell to seventh. defeat. throw made them look all the

igain
worse when compared with
Stanford quarterback Don
Bunce's 290 yards on 24 com-
pletions.
The Wolverines grabbed a 12-
10 lead on a safety in the clos-
ing minutes but were overcome
by Rod Garcia's 31-yard field
goal on the game's final play.
The erstwhile Indians, now the
Cardinals, had their winning
streak broken decisively in 1973.
Michigan capitalized on three
ill-timed Stanford turnovers to
take a 21-0 first quarter lead.
The Wolverines took ample re-
venge for the Rose Bowl de-
bacle as they crushed Stanford,
47-10.
The only thing that can be
said for certain about this year's
game is that the loser will re-
member it the next time they
meet.

OFFICES
SGC President
SGC Executive
Vice-President
RESIDENTIAL
CONSTITUENCY
Dorm
Fraternities
Sororities
Co-ops
University Married
Housing
Independent
(apartments)
DIVISIONAL
CONSTITUENCY
Graduate Rackham
Undergraduate
Professional, Grad
( Non-Rackham)

OTHER OFFICES
Board for Publications,
Underg rad
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE
CONSTITUENCY
LSA
Engineering
Education
Medical
Law
Business Ad.
Art
Arch. and Urban
Planning
Dental School
Music
Social Work
Natural Resources
Nursing
Library Science
Public Health
Pharmacy

'.

ford players held Michigan
scoreless for the game's first SIIUT OFF BY SAINTS:
24 minutes including a heroic:
goal line stand on their own '

one yard line. The spirit of their
fiture clashes was thus initi-
ated.
Sometime later, 1947 to be
exact, the Wolverine squad had
a legitimate claim on the na-
tion's number one ranking.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's
meatgrinding teams had rolled
up an incredible total of 24
consecutive victories by the
time the arrived in Ann Arbor.
THE AFFAIR was marked by
a revolt against high program
prices by the students. Claiming
that the athletic department's
fifty cent offering was packed
with "irrelevant facts and pic-.
tures of too-familiar buildings,"
the students sold their own ten
cent program with only the '

Stags lose exh
By BILL STIEG The scoring began when sev-!
The Michigan Stags, Detroit's eral first period penalties left
representative in the World the Stags o u t m a n n e d long
Hockey Association, were given enough for Ron Busniak to flip
their first test last night at a nice pass from behind the net
Yost Ice Arena against the Min- to Bob Boyd, who beat Mich-
nesota Fighting Saints. The igan's goalie Gerry Desjardins
Stags failed, 2-0. from point-blank range.
A pair of first period power'EIGHT MINUTES later, at
play goals was the difference 14:57, a goal-mouth scramole
in the sometimes slow, some- left an open net for Danny
times sloppy, but almost always O'Shea, who, along with Larry
boring prsetasnnm t y Johnston and Desjardins, had

ibton
one of the few. names familiar
to the crowd.
Perhaps realizing that their
lackluster performance w a s
making the crowd fidgety, the
players obligingly livened things
up with three fights, the first
two involving the Saints' Gordie
Gallant. The last, and most vio-
lent, fight surprisingly came
with less than two minutes left
in the apparently already de-
cided game.

I

EflIfi

The crowd was announced as
1205, but that number must
have included the bats residing
in Yost's rafters.

A I A /AIAAAlI1 AAe" IAA AIfI /IA AY
Grl*dde PI*eks

1. MICHIGAN at Stanford
(pick score)
2. California at Illinois
3. West Virginia at Indiana
4. Iowa at USC.
5. Notre Dame at Michigan
State
6. Minnesota at Nebraska
7. Oregon at Northwestern
8. Ohio State at Washington
St.
9. Purdue at Duke
10. Missouri at Wisconsin

11. Alabama at Mississippi
12. LSU at Florida
13. Va. Military vs. Virginia
Tech. (at Richmond)
14. Pittsburgh at N. Carolina
15. Georgia at Clemson
16. Richmond at Furman
17. Western Michigan at Kent
State
18. Navy at Boston College
19. Pennsylvania at Brown
20. DAILY LIBELS vs. Edit
Staff Flunkies

t
Phi Beta Kappa Auspices, Alpha Chapter
A MEDIEVALIST
LOOKS AT SPACE
IN MODERN ART
PROFESSOR ILENE H. FORSYTH
Deportment of the History of Art
PLACE: Rackham Amphitheatre (4th floor)
TIME: Thursday, Oct. 3-4:10 p.m.
OPEN TO GENERAL PUBLIC
*E
The Nickel Beer
is Back! (
ord/ /4oork //1

I

ORIGINAL GRAPHICS
BY WORLD FAMED ARTISTS
OF THE 19TH & 20TH CENTURIES

Bonnard
Broaue
Calder

Kandi-nsky
Maillol
M iro

These prints are all original, some
sgned and some unsigned. Most of
them sell for $10 to $20-some for
as much as $100. Come look over
our stock of hundreds of these

You have practically everything it takes to

be a postcard, if you have a Kodak pocke
Inn4n.,-n*:^ r - -r ..r rn . - rr - r ^ -z,+ r.;:

I

_____.___.._. :. r

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan