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October 03, 1974 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ursday, October 3, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Sevei'

i

Talks c(
hospital

ontinue with
interns, 'U'

(Continued from Page 1) would eliminate many benefits
One of the major areas under the doctors receive at Wiyne
discussion last night concerned County General Hospital, where
an administrative plan to clas- they are considered county em-
sify all interns and residents as ployes.
University employes. Interns and residents rotate
THE HOA contends that this during their work year among
Senate rejects
forehign aid bill
WASHINGTON (,P)-The Sen- to Turkey to the foreign aid bill
ate yesterday rejected a $2.5- in the same form as idtpted
billion foreign aid authorization earlier in the week, over Presi-
bill containing restrictions op- dent Ford's objections, to a
posed by the Ford administra- continuing money resolutian.

University hospital, the Vuyne
facility, and the local Veteran's
Administration hospital.
Another major area of nego-
tiation involved HOA insistance
that provisions for implement-
ing improved p a t i e n t care
should be spelled out in -he new
contract.
BEGINNING EARLY veser-
day, a number of union mem-
bers picketed outside the hos-
pital's main entrance - giving
visitors the unusual view of
white coated, stethescope-carry-
ing physicians toting placcaris.
Inside the facility, it was near-
ly "business as usual"-b'it not
quite. According to a number of
interns and staff persons, there
was little harassment or teasion
which usually occurs in labor
disnutes.
University hospital s e r' v e s
nearly 1,000 in-patients and has
a medical staff of 300, not in-
cluding interns and resilent
phvsicans.
THE HOA AND the hospital
administration have been tr ring
to negotiate a new contract for
the doctors since last July. But
the talks became deadlocked
two weeks ago.
Last night's session m-irked;
the first face-to-face meningf
between the negotiating teams
since then.
The old contract expired on
Sept. 1 and the physicians have
been working on a day-to-day'
extension of that pact until last
Monday, when they cancelled
the contract to begin the ssow-
down.

tion.
By a 41-39 vote, on motion by
Sen. John Pastore (D-R.I.), the
bill was returned to the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
for further study.
Sent back with it to commit-1
tee was an amendment passed
earlier in the day to require a
report to Congress before the
CIA undertakes a covert opera-
tion. A move to abolish such
operations lost.
SEN. H U B E R T Humphrey
(D-Minn.), floor manager of the
bill, accused the administration

Sen. James Abourezk (D-S D).)
who sponsored the foreign aid
amendment, refused to say itF
applied only to Turkey. He said
it applied to "any country" get-'
ting U.S. military equipment
and using it for aggressive pur-
poses in violation of U.S. for-
eign aid laws.
Sens. H'vmphrey and .John
Tower (R-Tex.) said it might
be applied to Israel and Greece,
although Humphrey said he
considered Israel's military ac-'
tivity defensive.
THE SENATE acted after re-

Campus Inteiview
minds,
matter
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If you're an EE, Computer Science, Math, Operations Research, or Physics major, you
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All these openings are at our corporate headquarters at Bedford, Massachusetts
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The MITRE Corporation
Box 208
Bedford, Massachusetts 01730
THE A __________A _____E ___y_
An Affirmative Action Employer

7
3
C

of not wanting the bill because
of legislative restrictions built,
in for what he said was "a
sorry lack of planning on the
whole policy of foreign assist-
ance."
Unpopular as it has become,
foreign aid "is necessary,"
Humphrey said, "it is part of,
the national security of this
co'lntrv."
BY A 48-34 vote, the Senate
added a cutoff of military aid'

fusing to abolish CIA coert
onerations but voting to require
that they be undertaken only in
the interest of national defense
and after a report to Congress.
Under an amendment adorned
by voice, money for covert 'c-
ti"'i by the CIA or any other
U.S. government agency wold
be hanned unless the President
finds the operation "vital to
the defense of the United
States."

1
t
t

AP Photo

Missing~
olding a fossilized pelvis of,
harles Oxnard professor of
he University of Chicago Schc
three dimensional model tha
hysical structures in animals
ther scientists are finding it
volutionary history of man.
RP, Derns
(Continued from Page 1)
ance. The undrafted HRP
m calls for a five-person rent,
trol panel elected from the
y's wards.
I'he Democrats generally ap-.
ared more favorable to the,
P plan. Fourth Ward Coun-
man Jamie Kenworthy said,
11 my objections to the last
RP rent control ballot pro-
al) have at least been ver-
ly corrected."
FIRST WARD Councilman'
ARTISTS and C
Spaces are stille
2nd Annual Con
Crafts

link'?
an ancient man-like ape, Dr.
anatomy and anthropology at
ool of Medicine stands behind
t shows relationships between{
, including man. Oxnard and
a useful tool in tracing the
* talk111rents)f~
Norris Thomas chided HRP for
pushing a charter amendment
that he claimed would almost
certainly be voided by the
courts. But he agreed with
Shoichet that "we can't even
hope for getting anything
through this (GOP-controlled)
council."
Most of the meeting was
spent discussing the HRP plan,
which that party plans to put
on the April ballot through a pe-
tition drive that will begin in
two weeks.
RAFTS PEOPLE
available for the
nmunity Arts &
Fair

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SATURDAY MORNING,
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Located 3 miles west of Hell,
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An interesting sale of antique
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PEARLE KIRTLAND ESTATE
William J. Stanton and
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Ph. Vermontville
(517) 726-0181

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Coupon expires Oct. 9, 1974
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Coupon good at BOTH STORES
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