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September 28, 1974 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-28

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Saturday, September 28, 1974

THE M1GHiGAN DAILY

Page Five

Saturday, September 28, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Fellini:

Accomplishments,

By KEVIN COONEY
Reuter Film Writer
NEW YORK (Reuter) - Talking
with Federico Fellini is rather like
seeing one of his films. His conversa-
tion shifts from the clear reality of
publicizing his latest film to the
vaguely unreal playroom of his mind
where his next one is cavorting.
The latest film is Amarcord, a por-
trait of a small Italian town in the
1930s. Like the one that came before
it, Roma, the film is highly auto-
biographical and the critics here are
very enthusiastic about it.
Fellini himself is rather bored with
the whole thing. "It is already an
old film. I finished it a year ago," he
said sitting near a high window in the
Sherry Netherlands Hotel, overlook-
ing Central Park.
"I feel a bit like a ham, a bit

goofy," he said, turning to his beau-
tiful translator for a little help with
"ham." "But they pay me to come
here and talk. So I come."
He refers to all his films as "big
jokes," and his next one will "make
fantasy, phantoms" of the life of
Casanova.
"This will be the true autobiogra-
phy," he says, waiting with a broad
grin to see if anyone will believe him.
The director, whose earlier works
include La Dolce Vita and 81/%, be-
lieves the idea of Casanova is still
a very modern one, because "that
type of man still exists in Italy, ev-
erywhere, who is afraid to be an
adult, who tries to find some way
of being grown up through women,
mother, prostitute, Madonna."
Why a figure who lived 250 years
ago? "One trick is as good as ano-

ther one. When you are younger, you
have to talk about things, explain
ideologies, why you do something."
But now, he said, all he has to do is
say "one trick is as good as another."
Fellini said over lunch that he
wants to examine Casanova using all
the techniques of psychology and mo-
dern thought and show how with all
the changes over the last two cen-
turies, there is really very little dif-
ference between the historical fig-
ure and his 20th century counter-
parts.
He says he looks forward to all of
the production problems he will face
in making the Casanova film, as he
always does. "Fighting problems has
to do with the creative process."
"It can be a very lovely, thing,
playing with fantasy and dreams.
And sometimes with the crew it is

I~is (Couzen's Film Co-op presents
Cazens
likr we are all taking a trip together. "East of Eden"
"It wasn't that way with Amarcord.
Strikes. Strikes. Strikes. Sixty minuteWITH
strikes, two hour strikes. Sometimes James Dean, Julie Harris,
over things like Vietnam solidarity," .ansD a,.ul an
he said. Raymond Massey,& Burl I"es
"One feels sympathy in the mindM e
for these people. But in the middle of Fri. & Sat. at 8 & 10
a film, they leave you standing there
with all the rational enthusiasm that Admission $1
you need to do it and not having any- University ID required for admission
thing to do." U I
"Enthusiasm" and "energy" a r e
words that come often in Fellini's
conversation. "Doubts, self-doubt,
these are excuses for not doing any-
thing. You must put them behind you
and go ahead with what you want to F Am e r
do." He makes his point by stacking o
the plates. PRESENTS
The sensualist of Satyricon had eat-.1
en a chef's salad. A Double Feature

Federico Fellini

li

Is.

1

...

MIIVIF1 tn TXT

1 T 1 l K-t). .R V
Lby MICHAEL WILSON--

As September slowly dissolves
into October and the leaves be-
gin the fall on your face, don't
forget this week's worth of good,
cheap thrills on the telepathic
television tube. Tonight kicks
off with a resounding thud
when Channel 20 presents the
superbly superficial Beyond
the Time Barrier (1960) at 8
p.m., starring Robert Clarke
and Darlene Tompkins in a fa-
talistic tale about our nuclear
future and neurotic past, direct-
ed with a passionate flair for
the ridiculous by Edgar Ulmer.
Sunday at 4 'on Channel 7
Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin
soothe your souls with The
Stooge (1952), a harmless and
hilarious comedy vehicle for
the two stars about a comic and
his patsy, co-starring Polly
Bergen.
Sunday night on Channel 7 at
9 p.m. Charles Bronson, that
towering inferno of talent, stars
in The Valachi Papers (1972)
with Jill Ireland and Joseph
Wiseman. The plot, concerning
detailed American corruption
ov'er a period of four decades,
is secondary to the unintentional
laughs and screenplay prat-
falls that director Torrence
Young falls prey to in this hys-
terical Mafiose farce.
Monday starts off eagerly
when Rita Bell's Prize Movie
on Channel 7 presents Greta
Garbo in Anna Karenina at
8:30 a.m. in beautiful black and
white. Fredric March is also
featured in this 1935 melodrama
about the imperial court of
Russia - but keep your eyes
on the glorious Garbo as the i-
licit heroine of a thousand
hearts.
Later Monday night the Bow-
ery Boys yuk it up in one of
the best Bowery monstrosities
entitled Mr. He (1946), a hyp-
notically saturated Leo Garcey-
Hunts Hall extravaganza.
Tuesday's headliner is Greta
Garbo once again as Rita Bell
and her Priceless Movie con-
tinues Garbo week at the same
time,ksame channel withNi-
notchka (1939), one of the best-
loved films to come out of the
short-lived Garbo cinema ca-
reer - this one's directed by
the incomparable Ernst Lu-
bitsch and also features Mel-
vyn Douglas, Sig Ruman and
Bela Lugosi in an amusing love
story set in front of and behind
the Iron Curtain.
Tuesday night stars Robertj
Stack as Eliot Ness in the or-
iginal "Untouchables" story,
The Scarface Mob (1962), which
also co-stars Keenan Wynn, Ne-
ville Brand and Barbra Nichols
at midnight on Channel 9.
Garbo plays it strictly for
tears Wednesday morning on
VAA
Thi8K@[M
$2.50 :
FRI.-SAT.
John Roberts
and
Tony Barrand
from ENGLAND
"PRowdy. bois'trus.'

Rita Bell in Camille (1937), the
classic Dumas romance which
also starred Robert Taylor and
Lionel Barrymore in a story
of French romance and tragic
illness that Greta capitulated
from moody melodrama into
moving, teasing historical dra-
ma.
The only other decent
Wednesday offering is at 11:30
p.m. on Channel 2 when Frank
Sinatra stars in Never So Few
(1959), a contagiously entertain-
ing jungle movie that also stars
Peter Lawford, Steve McQueen
and Gina Lollobrigida.
Great Garbo poses as her
own twin sister in Two-Faced
Woman (1941) on the Prize Mo-
vie Thursday morning in order
to test hubby Melvyn Doug-
las' love. It's all very cute and
a lot better than most movies,;
but it flopped and the great
Garbo never made another pic-
ture after this one.
The rest of Thursday com-
pared to the immortal Greta is
worthless but Friday at 4 p.m.
on Channel 11 Jerry Lewis
stars in The Family Jewels
(1965) and plays eight different
characters in a thoroughly en-
joyable and immature (thank-
fully) farce, one of the best
Lewis vehicles.
Later Friday night at 9 p.m.
on Channel 2 Steve McQueen
plays tough in Bullit (1968),
Peter Yates' San Francisco de-
tective story with Robert
Vaughn and Jacqueline Bisset
in supporting roles. The film is
excellent, though plotwise al-
most totally incoherent - per-
haps this is what makes it all
so effective.
My only other suggestion is
the fabulous Invisible Man Re-
turns (1940) Friday night at 1:30
a.m. on 2, with Vincent Price
the star of this sequel to the
Claude Rains classic. Price is
the perfect fiend for the role of
a prison convict who escapes
after being injected with an in-
visibility serum - Sir Cedric
Hardwicke also graces the
screen.

IIRIIIE
b
NORTH
A A 9 6 4 2
YvAQ
* A 10 9
.K93
WEST EAST
A 10 A 7 5
V 10 9 8 5 2 Y K J 7 6
f 642 * Q53
.. Q 1087 .. J654
SOUTH
A K Q J 8 3
V 43
f K J 8 7
. A 2
South West North East
1 A Pass 2 NT Pass
4 A Pass 6 A Pass
3 A Pass 4 f Pass
Pass Pass
2 NT-forcing spade raise
3 A-better than minimum,
no singletons or voids
Opening lead: v 10.
There is a famous anecdote
from the infancy of bridge aboutj
Hal Sims, one of contract!
bridge'skgreat players. He was
never known to misguess a!
queen when confronted with a
two way finesse; inevitably, one
of hisopponents would give its
location away through some
nervous expression or another.
However, one day he found;
himself playing a slam for
which his only play was to
guess which opponent held the
missing queen. As Hal played+
the hand out his face carried;
an increasingly perplexed ex-+
pression.
Finally after several minutes'
of thought he exclaimed "both
of you birds have got it," and
sure enough he was right. The,
deal had been preivously set
up and both opponents given the
missing queen.
For those of us who are not
gifted with second sight there
is occasionally a better way of
solving such problems. On this'
hand declarer found himself in
Six Spades, an extremely rea-
sonable contract depending at
worst upon one of two finesses,
a 75 per cent line of play. De-
clarer, however, found himself
a 100 per cent line of play at
only the cost of a potential{

Endplay eliminates
necessity of
finesse
y FRANK BELL
overtrick.
When the 10 of hearts hit the
table declarer did not auto-
matically call a card, but sat
back and thought the hand over.
He saw that he had two poten-
tial losers, the king of hearts
if the finesse failed and the
queen of diamonds if he mis-
guessed, but he was not a
greedy man, he would be happy
to lose one red trick if in doing
so it insured against the lose
of two.
Therefore, he rose with the
ace of hearts and pulled the
outstanding t r u m p in two
rounds. Next he cashed his club
ace, led to dummy's king, and
ruffed dummy's remaining c'ub.
Now he exited with a heart
and claimed his contrast, for
whichever opponent won the
trick would be endplayed, he
would either lead a diamond
taking declarer off the diamond
guess, or a heart or club in
which case declarer would be
able to sluff dummy's diamond!
and ruff in his hand.
Note that even Hal S ms
would have disdainedathe heart
finesse, with his great propen-
sity for guessing queens, he
would have taken the ace of
hearts and subsequently taken
a repeated finesse against the
onponent who held the queen of
diamonds, s 1 u f f e d dummy's
queen of hearts on the fourth
diamond, and ruffed his small
heart in dummy making an
overtrick.
Luther plays
Ypsi Sunday
The Suds Factory, in Ypsi-
lanti, will present Luther Alli-
son Sunday evening, along with!
Friends Roadshow. Allison first
appeared in this area in the
spring of 1969, becoming a reg-
ular feature of all the Blues
Festivals. Luther is a young
guitarist - singer of amazing
potential. Tickets will be $2.50
at the door; the show starts at
9:30.

BURSLEY HALL ENTERPRISES
PRESENTS

"PLAY IT AGAIN SAM"
SATURDAY, SEPT. 28
Bursley W. Cafe. Admission $1
9:00 P.M.
must present U.M. ID for admission
ARTl
ARP
BASKIN OIL PAINTINGS
BONNARD
BUFFET A910UE OILS
CEZANNE GR4PH ICS
CHAGALL
DAL I
DAUMIER PRESENTED BY
DUFY
FRI EDLAENDER
GOYA
LAUT REC TOMORROW
LIBERMAN
MIROT EXHIBIT 1-3,OO.
PICASSOA-
REDON UCTION 3'OO
ROCKWELL Win Schuer's Marriott Inn
ROUAULT 3600 Plymouth Road
RUB IN Ann Arbor, Mi
SHAHN BALLROOM
VASARELY
REFRESHMENTS
BANKAMERICARD
AMERICAN EXPRESS
MASTERCHARGE
1974's MOST HILARIOUS
WILDEST MOVIE IS HERE!
"May be the funniest movie of the
year. Rush to see it!" --Minneapois FrounE
"A smashing, triumphant satire.
-SeattIe Post Inte ogencer
"Riotously, excruciatingly funny."
-MWaukee Sent:nel
"Consistently hilarious and
brilliant' -: , reoDaly ecrd
"Insanely funny, outrageous and
irreverent' Bruce VVIaEs-PLAYBOY MAGAZINE

WOODY

ALLEN'S

STARRING
Don Sutherland & Jane Fonda
in
STEEL YARD BLUES"
at7:30& 11:00
"KLUTE"
F SAT., SEPT. 27, 28
NAT SCI AUD-Admission $1

MMIL-

I

Rating)
* (Higest
"TOPS IN ENTERTAINMENT.":
-New York News
(5 Camera Eyes- Highest Rating)
"STUPENDOUS"
-CBS-TV
CHIGAN Open Dily 12 45
Shows at
603 E. Liberty 1-3:10-5:15-
Dial 665-6290 7:20 & 9:30 ('G)

N:

I1

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um - ______ ______ ______ ______ H

1. - lw s w w .mw qw w q

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pass

2nd HILARIOUS WEEK

A GREAT NEW
MOTION PICTURE COMEDY

4.4igUA
$$$s Cm laics!
t1he 0 _0.

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RESIRCU L I t

R I S T R t ( T I D

ILL, I

1

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