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September 25, 1974 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-25

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 25, 1974

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, September 25, 1974

Mayor defends
changing voter
registra tion
(Continued from Page 1)
The mayor was referring to his objection to
registration workers last year who left the fish-
bowl to recruit voters at Alice Lloyd Hall.
Monday night Stephenson explained that he
supported dropping the fishbowl site because it is
a "mass confusion area where student can be
peer-pressured. In the past this has resulted in
unintended registration by students."
ASSERTING THAT "our duty is to make regis-
tration facilities available," Stephenson claimed
Monday, "We clearly meet that duty."
Ins response to Monday night's resolution,.
Democrat and Human Rights Party (HRP) coun-
cilpersons charged the majority Republicans with
discrimination against students.
Councilman James Kenworthy (D-Fourth
Ward) said at the meeting, "We have a ten-
dency to lose sites in the campus area." He
added, "It seems people are playing politics
with voter registration sites."
KENWORTHY CHARGED, "The real aim of
this is a non-registration drive.
DICK GRIFFEY presents:
THE 1974 STEVIE WONDER FALL TOUR
fSTEVIE WONDER
WITH
Wonderlove
PLUS
The Commodores
FRI., SEPT. 27-8.30 P.M..
at
OLYMPIA STADIUM
TICKETS: $7.50, 6.00
Tickets At-Olympia, Grinnell's & Hudson's
MC. Honored at Olympia
5920 OLYMPIA.STADIUM Detroit
Grand River (313) 895-7000 48202

OPEC
refuses
blame for
oil costs
(Continued from Page 1)
Arab League in Cairo said
speeches by Ford and Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger sharp-
ly criticizing the high level of
crude oil prices had shocked
the Arabs.
In ' Caracas, a government
source said Venezuela is study-
ing the possibility of increasing
U.S. and other foreign oil com-
panies income tax payments by
between 10 and 15 per cent on
f each barrel.
A member of Venezuela's rul-
ing DemocraticAction party
claimed that "every day the
president of the United States
shows that he is badly informed
and advised" on oil matters.
CELESTINO ARMAS added
that "the situation could ser-
iously affect the traditional and
cordial relations between de-
veloped and industrialized coun-
tries."
Venezuela is the world's fifth
largest oil producer and third
ranking exporter.
In Beirut, Lebanon, the Arab
press accused the United States
of waging a war of nerves
against Arab oil producers in
an effort to force price cut-
backs.
"THE UNITED States wants
to appear to the world as the
good guy fighting the Arab oi
producers who are the villains"
wrote Michel Ahou Jawdeh in
the independent newspaper Al
Nahar.
At the ministerial conference
in Vienna earlier this month,
OPEC kept oil prices frozen but
increased royalties and taxes
paid by the companies to the
governments in producing coun-
AP Photo tries by 3.5 per cent.
The OPEC official's statement
was not a formal communique
but it clearly reflected the
ndmill to policy of his organization.
welcomed HE SAID, "We know that our
pening in oil has been wasted for a long
time . . ." and added that "if
the people in the United States
and other industrialized coun-
tries would like to share our
'F standard of living we might
II Ifind a common solution for deal-
ing with the oil situation."
* OPEC members include coun-
E tries in the Organization of Arab
Petroleum Exporting Countries
but also the non-Arab states of
Indonesia, I r a n, Venezuela,
Ecuador, Nigeria and Gabon..
S
&IQ $2.50 ~

f the
s ribune
re"'
FRI.-SAT.
igencer
nny"' John
Sentinel
Roberts
Record A LMn

f Sweet stratns of Schubert
Then Alcantara conducts the opening concert of the Ujiversity Symphony Orchestra last night
in 11111 Auditorium. The program consisted of w arks by Schubert, Liszt and Richard Strauss.
NO ARMS INVOLVED:

~L-

Energy hangups
Hanging from a crane, a workman prepares a wi
generate electricity for billboard lights which '
delegates to the Ninth World Energy Conference of
Detroit last Monday.
WuEDNESDAY is SINGLES NIGI
and WCRN Broadcasts LIVI
from
341 S. MAIN
DANCE, ROCK, and ROLL

I

0

By KENNETH FREED
AP News Analysis
WASHINGTON - The United
States has little in the way of
hard weaponry to back up the
Ford administration's tough-
talk concerning a new oil crisis.
Pre'sident Ford, Secretary of
S t a t e Henry Kissinger andt
Treasury Secretary Wiliam- Si-
mon in the past week have
warned of a disastrous interna-
tional economic disruption if
the price of Arab oil is not low-
ered.
FORD AND KISSINGER, par-
ticularly, indicated)the Western!
industrialized nations would
not sit placidly by while the
oil producers accumulated more
and more of their currency.
Administration sources have
outlined several possibilities un-
der consideration for meeting
the oil threat, ranging from+
diplomatic isolation of the Arab
states to a last-resort use of
military force.
But an analysis of projected
remedies and discussions with
administration and diplomatic'
sources indicate the U. S. stra-.
tegy most likely to be followed
is a very complicated, long-
range solution that requires
nearly unprecedented interna-
tional cooperation.
THE FIRST STEP was start-
ed last week in Brussels, when
12 nations agreedstentatively
on a coordinated plan to reduce
their oil demand in the eventf
of a new crisis while sharing
the available supply.
The next stage may come this
weekend with a reported meet-
ing Kissinger and Simon will
hold at Camp David with the
tWoody Alien
S :John Carradine
Lou Jacobi
Lo aoiLouise Lasser
Anthony Quayle
Tony Randall
Lynn Re dgrave
Burt r4eynolds
Gene Wider ;

AFSCME for UAW

(Continued from Page 1)
en _Gehr, a senior secretary at!
the School of Public Health,
said: "Clericals for AFSCME,
recognizing the great need for
union representation of clericals
at the University of Michigan,
endorses Concerned Clericals,
for. Action (CCFA) and .the
UAW in their campaign to win

I'm not sure about the others."
After the hard-fought \cam-
paign Gehr admitted there were
some hard feelings in the
AFSCME camp t o w a r d the
UAW, "Oh yes, no question
about it," but she added "at
thi1f point in the election I cer-
tainly don't want to hurt their
chances at all," in defending

foreign and finance ministers of
Japan, Great Britain, West Ger-
many and France.
Kissinger is said to have ar,
ranged the meeting in secrecy
for a detailed study of ways
to offset the Arabs' economic
power and encourage a com-,
mon front.
THE THEORY is that if all
the big' oil users cut their de-
mand the Arabs will have no
other major market and will
be forced to reduce prices.
Running parallel to this ef-
fort, U. S. officials say will be
a move to gain the support of1
lesser developed nations, in-

cluding such important coun-
tries as India and other mem-
bers of the so-called "third
world" bloc.
These countries have backed
the Arabs against Israel, but
U. S. officials feel that sup-
port may have weakened be-
cause the poorer nations have
been hardest hit by the soaring
cost of oil and petroleum-based
products.
Not content to count on this
hoped-for weakening,,the United
States has pledged to continue
and even increase its "sppplies
of food as a lever to gain co-
operation. from the lesser de-
veloped countries.

i . . __... _. . ._._ _._ .. ..-- .,- ._._..__.. __._.

I

AIR

r

1974's MOST HILARIOU
WILDEST MOVIE IS HEF

"May be the funniest movie o
year. Rush to see it!" ---Mnneapois
"A smashing, triumphant sati
- Seatte Post Inte3
"Riotously, excruciatingly fur
Milwaukee
"Consistently hilarious and
brilliant:'it ~ore o31

such union representatiop and her pro-UAW stance.
urges all secretaries and cleri-
cals to vote CFA and UAW in THE EFFECT of the endorse-
the upcoming runoff election." ment could not be immediately
gauged, but one local observer
THE DECISION to stand be- said he felt the AFSCME plug
hind the UAW candidacy was could help tip the balance in
reached by calling about 20 favor ,of unionization of Univer-
ranking members of the Cleri- sity clericals in light of the sur-
cals for AFSCME and soliciting prisingly high n u m b~e r who
their views on the matter. chose the no union option in
Gehr admitted there was the preliminary election.
"some dissenting opinion, but The clash between the two
we do believe a union is need Tt
ed." Gehr herself said, "I'm massive national unions. was
in favor of the endorsement, hard-fought and attracted much
attention f r o m the national
unions but Gehr had no figures
on how much AFSCME had
N? spent in their effort to repre-
sent the clericals and secre-
taries.
~ -- - -- - - --

"Insanely funny, outrageous and
irreverent'-Bruce Willamson--PLAYBOY MAGAZINE

A GREAT NEW
MOTION PICTURE COMEDY

Haiha Yoga
exercise class
Wed. 8 p.m.
Rudrananda
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640 Oxford
663-9287

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reieased 'n 191 5. Aside from that it is a fast and moving story of the Civil

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