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September 05, 1974 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September S, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Thursday, September 5, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Student life:
A potpourri
0f flavors
(Continued from Page 3)
There is little frivoity s t
campus. Entertainme:nt ha; to
be mined from the academic
pits of constant study, 0h11, wor-
shipped A and the constant pres-
sure not to fail. To help, there r5
are as many 'film groups as gas
companies, constantly vying for
audiences for the fifteenth an-
nual showing of "Citizen Kane"
and the last chance ever to s.e
"King of Hearts."
The University is at leat a . -
place of opportunity. The uni-
versity has incredible stores of
information and capacities for
inspired guidance, but the indus-
trious and serious student has
to be a ferret to find these ->
benefits and profit from them.
STUDENTS often seem like
walking sieves, who knew four
hours before the final exam all f{ :.
the information we thought we
ought to, and forget i0 four
hours afterward. Many of us
concentrate on learning what we
think we will -be tested on in-
stead of learning what we think
we can use in our lives.
This university can be a place
to build paper futures or lay
the foundations foxr r, al ones.
It is an academic playpen to.
grow up in, and a high-cost
mental institution that has the
equipment to help us learn to
live the lives we wait for cur-
selves.
Campus group pushes for change.
in University's academic structure

Students aid elderly, disabled

By JOHN McMANUS

modates 1,100

students per

If you're not looking forward' term.
to long nights lodged in the BESIDES LIBERATING stu-
'bowels of the Graduate Library dnsfo okfedwr
poring over the leaves of an-r dents from books, field work
cient wisdom, perhaps you provides supervised interaction
w raer+garnryouraa-----in complex situations.

sitions are filled by undergrad-
uates. Each Outreach student
thus has a chance to go beyond
his first experience in the field
by becoming a group leader or
project coordinator.

i
t
.
;:
x

would rather garner your aca-
demic credits by tutoring emo- "Students should find out PROJECT OUTREACH began
tionally disturbed children or: how hard it is to reach pa- in 1965 as the brainchild of Dr.-
working with geriatric or re- tients at a mental hospital such Richard Mann of the Psycholo-
tarded patients. as Ypsilanti State," says Rein- gy department.
Project Outreach - also harz. "Some students are turn- In 1972, Reinharz became the
known as Psychology 201 - is ed on to new vocations through first faculty level coordinator ofI
a two-credit course hthe experience - others may the program. It was previously
dents learn by prsepwhere sti discover they aren't suited to i run by graduate students with-
community service projects. the job." in the department.
Project Outreach also serves: In the past two years, the
ONCE INVOLVED IN the the community, Reinharz notes. program has more than doub-j
program, you may find your- The various projects provide a! led and now includes 1,100 stu-
self playing chess with an in- structured outlet for students to dents.
mate from Ypsilanti State Has-. act on their idealistic motiva- The Outreach student usually
pital or enlivening the last tions. meets once a week with his/her
days of a child dying of lueke- group to plan activities and dis-
mia at Mott Children's Hos- EXCEPT FOR Reinharz who cuss the project itself. General-
pital. s a faculty member, Outreach ' ly, the student will spend 3-4
"The purpose of Project Out- is student run. hours per week at the project
reach is to provide field work The basic unit of organiza- ' site.
experience for University stu- tion is the group which consists
dents," explains Director Shula of 4 to 12 students and a group DEPENDING UPON the pro-
Reinharz. "People really enjoy leader. One or more groups are ject the student may be requir-
Outreach - students yearn to assigned to a project such as ed to attend seminars or field
get out in the real world and a state hospital or day-care trips.
test the theories they learned center. These groups are un- Until this Spring all Out-
in class." der the supervision of a project reach students received a let-

for those students interested in
Outreach on Tuesday Septem-
ber 10, 7:30 p.m., at Hill Audi-
torium. At this meeting students
sign up for one of the 30 pro-
jects. Unfortunately there are
usually not enough project
spaces for every applicant and
a few are turned away each
semester.
B careful with fire:
There are babes
in the woods.

Although the program was4
originally conceived for psy-
chology majors, it now accom-

coordinator.
What makes the program
unique is that most of these po-

ter grade. However, grading is
now on a credit/no credit basis.
There will be a mass meeting

., R MvertidM r et+W+i d to tlee PaE s pif.

-------------

SOMETHING

ELSE

"WHERE THERE'S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE"

FEA TURING:
CRAFTS from APPALACHIA
. JACOB'S LADDER
*WHIMMY DIDDLE
* DO-NOTHING MACHINE
" FLIPPER DINGERS
" WEST VIRGINIA STOMPER
KALE IDOSCOPES
(see the world in a different dimension)
TENNESSEE WALKING
HORSES
ASSORTED DRIFTWOOD
ITEMS
HAND QUILTED QUILTS
(and other patchwork)

DOLLS
" RAGGEDY ANN AND ANDY
" CORN COB
" CORN HUSK
" APPLE HEAD
* CLOTHES PIN
" ESKIMO
" STORYBOOK
FINGER PUPPETS
JEWELRY
GWEN FROSTIC BOOKS
ORGANIC MICE
and MUCH, MUCH MORE

_ ._
w .. J
t
J'

By SARA RIMER
In the spring of 1971, when
radical ideas were still a potent
force on campus, a group of stu-
dents, faculty members and lo-
cal citizens concerned with edu-'
cational innovation meshed their
leftist ideologies into the Pro-
gram for Educational and So-
cial Change. (PESC).
Originally committed to open
classrooms, which would have
allowed non-students to attend
lectures, PESC was fortified
with about 100 members. How-
ever, the group gradually lost
its faculty and community sup-
port when liberal professors left
for other universities and many
of the remaining members, sad-
dled with a burgeoning sense of
frustration, settled into apathy.

PESC's original intent to open
classes to the community was
thwarted in winter 1972 whenE
ex-Vice President Allan Smith
ruled that only those who pay,
tuition would be allowed to at-
tend classes. PESC encounteredi
similar failures with its involve-
ment in the Black Action Move-
ment (BAM) and the Gradua-
tion Requirements Commission
(GRC).
ACCORDING TO student mem-
A C C 0 R D I N G to stu-,
dent member Jonathan Klein,
the main problem PESC now
faces is one of how to rethink
the ideas and values involved in
reform after their past at-,
tempts at radical innovation
have been repeatedly quashed.
In an effort to analyze why'

reform has so blatantly failed,
PESC produced a booklet last!
year on the history and func-
tion of education in capitalist
society. The heavily researched
document concludes that one
must change the fundamental
values of society before the
problems of education can be,
confronted:
In spite of the radical dogma
espoused in the PESC Papers
on Education, Klein asserts,
"We don't have any strict party
lines or philosophy.".
PESC, which has been a po-
tent force in LSA student gov-
ernment, has captured the top
two spots in the last four elec-
tions.
HOWEVER, PESC is not re-
garded by its members as aa

political party, although they
believe that student government'
is an important vehicle for
change.
PROBING, organizing, ques-
tioning, and often meeting de-
feat, PESC is continuing its
search for alternatives to a
university and society whose
values they deeply suspect.
Swallowing daily frustrations,!
they characterize themselves in
the PESC Papers as "a group
of students and ex-students
working in, around, and in spite
of the University of Michigan."
Unburdened by a rigid party
line, PESC welcomes new peo-
ple. As Stephens declares, "Stu-
dents need support from their
peers in surviving."

I
;
i
__i

SOMETHING ELSE
LOCATED IN KERRYTOWN 11 (Nea r Farmers Market)-415 N. Fifth
Fall Hours: Weekdays 10-6, Sat. 9-5

Ave.
769-7680

c
3
y
J
z
i
a
E

BOB STEPHENS, the Univer- |
sity's Advocate for Educational
Innovation and an active PESC
member, comments, "We're
just sort of gadflies in many
ways who peck at society's
wounds."
PESC has been steadily
"pecking" away at the Univer-
sity for the last few years,
fruitlessly trying to bore holes
in an institution they attack as
elitist and a slave to the de-
mands of the capitalist society. ..
JONTHE 3
Freshr
STAFF
MASS MEETING a
THURS., SEPT.12 to the
(Or drop in Today)
For more details, read
the "DAILY"--daily
_ __ __ __ UNIVERSITY ofI
and the
-skp
CITY of ANN
We invite you
down town and s
department
WE THINK YOU'LL LIKE V
Students! You are invited to
worship with us at 10:00
a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Sun-
days. Join us also for: Dis-
cussions - Social activities
Retreats
Rev. Donald Postema

Mme
n en
MICHIGAN

Lr
oR C
_ ro
~C
allow us to introduce ourse.
we re discount records o and weve got just abouLT any
kind of music you could want (dccmsories too?)
W Leler you're ino rocVSou ,jazz, b6UCSfolk,
casica, or any oler category, come see us!
And w Ve gOl Jd O hoI T10

3

ARBOR

':.

to

come

hop in our

store.

WHAT YOU SEE ..,

I
>:-: ;
''s {
': j
I
4' I
I

W^VNW#AVWAVOW"

if) '

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