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September 05, 1974 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page' Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 5, 1974

-Page||Four T HE| M|IC HIG AN|||| D AILY| Thursday, Septe m ber 5, 1974 1 . .- - --

Graffiti plagues janitors

Advocates counsel minorities

(Continued from Page 2)
"I break my back trying to '
keep the place clean,' she says,
"and the minute I turn my
back, the garbage pops upl
again."
SOMETIMES, local graffiti
has even bordered on vandalism;
such as when Ohio State fans
spray-painted several Univer-
sity buildings on the eve of the
Ohio-Michigan football game
last year.
Most grafitti, however, is rel-
atively harmless and is usually
scrawled in comparatively ob-
scure places. Many people find
the messages and spithets that
cover many lavatory stalls en-
tertaining.
Often, University restroomI

are decorated with messages in-
dicating the toilet paper dis-
pensers declaring - "U-M di-
ploma, take one."
ANOTHER POPULAR saying
adorning john walls is, "The
more you cultivate people, the
more you turn up clods."
Social scientists have often
tried to explain the urge which
gives rise to wall writings. One
anthropologist relates wall writ-
ing to one's primitive urge to
stake out territory.
In recent weeks, a University
psychologist has been leaving
wall messages at various cam-
pus location requesting grafit-
ti artists to explain their ac-
tions. If interested, call 668-
6029.

WELCOME FRESHMEN

Frequently, when minority students en-
counter personal or academic problems at
the University, they find traditional coun-
seling channels inadequate.
Because of the specialized needs of
blacks, Chicanos, Native Americans and
gay students, the University responded to
student pressure three years ago and es-
tablished the advocates office.
HOUSED IN the Office of Special Serv-
ices and Programs on the third floor of
the Union, the advocates provide much
more for their constituency than simply
run-of-the-mill counseling.
The six advocates help recruit minority
students, offer support and direction to
their constituency's organizations, and
fight discrimination and stereotyping in
and out of the classroom.
Richard Garland, the black advocate,
looks into many of the problems and is-
sues confronting black students, who
:omprise seven per cent of the total en-
rollment.
According to him, racial discrimination
in the classroom is one of the primary
problems facing blacks. In some cases,
Garland has helped students in bringing
their plights before the courts.
ALL OF THE advocates have at their
disposal dimited funds to provide their
constituency with financial assistance. The
money is sometimes channeled into stu-
dent organizations who sponsor activities
for minority. students.
The two other ethnic advocates, Moose
Pamp (Native American) and Arturo
Nelson (Chicano) spend a great deal of

time recruiting minority students and
counseling their constituency.
Pamp, Nelson, and Garland also helped
organize a Third World Peojle's Solidarity
Conference last February that brought
Angela Davis, black activist and Clyde
Bellacourt, co-founder of the American
Indian Movement to speak on campus.
THE CONFERENCE also focused on
workshops to help minority students rec-
ognize and confront the problems of racial
discrimination.
Jackie Bailey and Jim Toy, the Human
Sexuality (Gay) Advocates provide al-
most round-the-clock counseling services
for lesbians and homosexuals. Through the
Gay Hotline (761-2044), either Toy or an-
other counselor can be reached 24 hours
a day for crisis counseling and referral
services.
According to Toy, the oppression of gay
people is social, legal and psychological-
and that this oppression demans an ad-
vocacy for the rights of gay people.
THEIR SERVICES include counseling,
educating, and organizing. Both Bailey and
Toy help the gay community voice its
concern about its oppression and institute
action to relieve this, oppression.
They have helped organize gay dances
and an annual event called Gay Pride
Week which features both social and edu-
cational events pertaining to homosexuals
and lesbians.
The remaining advocate, Bob Stephens,
works in the field of educational innova-
tion. Most of his counseling duties center
around aiding students devise new educa-
tional programs and arranging various
conferences.

Clark's
TREKS
MEN'S
AND
WOMEN'S
ALSO

Moose Pamp

Jim Toy

GET
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1 coupon per person
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Pedal pushers primer on
preventing bicycle thefts

Streakers
strike
cam-pus
(Continued from Page 3)
the nude - and occasionally were
forced. to mill around in groups, wait-
ing for the crowd to disperse suffic-
iently to let them through.
ANOTHER well publicized streakin
was held at the Centicore book-shop
on Maynard Street about a week lat-
er, when the proprietorsthere offered
of SO per cent discount to all streak-
ers.
The sale offered cheap books for
the streakers, cheap publicity for
the store, owners, and cheap thrills
for onlookers, attracting 40 streakers
and 100 spectators.
IIn general, the streaking patrons
didn't select books from any particu-
lar literary genre, but bought works
ranging from science fiction to seri-
ous prose.
Some nude buyers at the sale fran-
tically rushed about the store look-
ing for books in the true streaking
ethic, while other streakers casually
browsed through the shelves.
And then, of course, there were
he heroic, individual attempts all
over campus, too numerous to recount
here.
Discounting the scholarly com-
ments from the social analysts and
cocktail party psychologists, about all
that can be said about streaking is
that it provided some people with a
temporary diversion from exams, job
pressures, and dormitory food.

0
$A!
m
D!

HEADQUARTERS FOR:
FRYE, CLARKS, FLORSHEIM,
DEXTER, and NATURE SHOES
WxAMERICARO
'OWNTOWN CAMPUS
175. Main a t619 E. Liberty

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V ~ACC~ESSORIES HENWA
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INSTRUMENTS CLASSIC
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PHONE 665-H0OU1 R S
209 S. STAI, ANN ARBOR (UPSTAIRS)

By BARBARA CORNELL
If you are one of those people who lie
awake nights figuring out methods to
keep your shiny new 10-speed bike from
being stolen, Ann Arbor's Crime Preven-
tion Officer Al Padilla's advice to you is
simply, "don't buy one."
This somewhat sardonic advice of course
does you absolutely no good if you have
already bought yourself a bike, so Padilla
offers a few more helpful suggestions.
FIRST, HE SAYS, "It may sound sim-
ple, but keep your bike locked. Many
bikes are stolen because of carelessness."
He adds that bike owners should make
sure their locks are not touching the
ground. "If the lock is touching the ground

it gives leverage for the lock cutters."
He also suggests that a department or
hardware store is not the place to buy a
lock. "Go to a bike store and get their
advice."
ANDY OVERMIRE, an employe at Ann
Arbor Cyclery asserts that even experts
disagree about lock quality. Although he
claims that all locks except for a few can
be cut, it is still important to get a good
lock.
According to Overmire, chain locks are
his preference since they require larger
bolt cutters that big chains can damage.
le says cables can be cut easily and witih
less conspicuous cutters but adds that
people tend to prefer cables because they
are lighter and easy to cary.

-A T- W 4~ -o W .

Upen Monday
and Friday
N ichts

Open
Friday
Nights

Two Stores

-3

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-.- . "'
: :. -,

R.O.1'.C.

IT'S

OT

{ +'
;i
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x,

LATE!

ENROLL AS A FRESHMAN FOR FULL BENEFITS

I

If you couldn't register, for ROTC during early

registration

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t.

II'

rri
irnrru

EAPORI1
Ar" A NI NS?

1F7r -___ __________-__ _~..~~ ----_T11

Theatre

Programs

w

is offering

a

c--.-----74

_wl"Muka"

It's no joke, really. The University

book of ten tickets for just ten dol-
lars. The book entitles you to see
whatever show you wish, and sit in
whatever seat you can get at the
time you exchange each coupon for
a ticket. The coupons can be used
all at once, e.g.,ten people can use
one book for one show; or the cou-
pons can be used individually.

You can still enter the program during Drop-Add
Check Out the Benefits:
" Scholarships and Stipend
" Leadership Training
" Guaranteed Employment

EACH BOOK CAN BE USED FOR THE FOLLOWING POWER CENTER SHOWS:

OCT. 9-12-Edmond Rostand's
DEC. 4-7-William Shakespeare's
FEB. 5-8
APRIL16-19-Aristophanes'

'CYRANO DE BERGERAC'
'PERICLES'
A new play featuring guest actors
'THE BIRDS'

after Graduation

v

The book can also be used for the University Theatre Showcase, to be selected from: The House of
Bernardo Alba, No Place To Be Somebody, Moonchildren, The Last Days of Mrs. Lincoln, The Real
Inspector Hound and others.

Check Out the People:

Talk it over with us ... September 3rd .

. .

In addition, this book
contains discount cou-
pons for Professional
Theatre Program of f-
erings.
Come , into the PTP

1 f
*MAIL ORDER FORM;
* U-M Student I.D. _,,_____ ,, ---- --,..---- _
Name___ ___. __ ___ _.Phone _________
Address_ _ _ _ _.__.__ __
Street City State Zip
r ti1

OPEN HOUSE AT NORTH HALL

I

I

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