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September 21, 1974 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY saturday, September 21, 1974

Page Two

DICK GRIFFEY presents:
THE 1974 STEVIE WONDER FALL TOUR
STEVIE WONDER
WITH
Wonderlove
PLUS
The Commodores
FRI,, SEPT. 27-8:30 P.M.
at
OLYMPIA STADIUM
TICKETS: $7.50, 6.00
Tickets At-Olympia, Grinnell's & Hudson's
MC .. . Honored at Olympia
5920 OLYMPIA STADIUM Detroit
Grand River (313) 895-7000 48202
lit

Nixon to enter hospital on
Monday for leg treatment

(Continued fromPage 1)
A hearing on the motion was'
scheduled Friday, then post-
poned to Monday.

amine Mr. Nixon and report
their findings to the court," Ja-
worski said.

THERE WAS no immediate
YESTERDAY Special Prose-' response from Sirica.
cutor Leon Jaworski suggested If Nixon is too ill to testify,
to U. S. District Court Judge a deposition might be taken out-
John Sirica that he conduct his , side the courtroom, Jaworski
own inquiry into whether Nixon I said.
is healthy enough to testify at Julie Nixon Eisenhower, the
the Watergate cover-up trial. formerPresident's youngest
Jaworski and defendant John:f daughter, arrived in San Cle-
Ehrlichman have subpoenaed mente on Thursday. Sources
Nixon to appear at the trial, said she had flown there to con-
scheduled to begin Oct. 1. vince her ailing father to enter
If Nixon is reported too ill' a hospital.
to appear at the trial, "the She had not seen him since he
court could consider taking the resigned as President on Aug.
customary step of appointing a 9 and went into seclusion at his
team of medical experts to ex- oceanside estate, although she
t __m__f_ m edica___xperts_____x-_has talked to him by telephone.
NIXON HAS been suffering
from phlebitis, an inflammation
of a vein, for several months.

and clot had formed and that
the former president was suf-
fering from "severe physical
strain and physical fatigue."
The new clot is in a vein
above Nixon's left knee, Tkach
said, adding that "the leg is
swollen and painful. The clot
from the earlier phlebitis, which
is still present, causes the for-
mer President periodic pain."
Nixon's attorneys filed a ma-
tion Monday in Los Angeles,
asking that the Charlotte sub-,
poena be quashed because of
Nixon's ill health and because,
they argued, his actions at the
time and documents andatape
recordings were covered by
presidential privilege.
The Charlotte suit was filed
by 21 persons contending White
House aides and local officials
illegally prevented them from
attending a 1971 rally in honor
of the Rev. Billy Graham.
Nixon spoke at the event.

ALPHA DELTA PHI FRATERNITY
Of course we have a beautiful house, excellent
meals, scholastics, great social life, and athletic
competition!
We have something unique
to offer to enrich
your college experience.
COME SEE US!

i Last week Tkach said an ex-
amination showed that a sec-

U' doctor: Nixon
delay risked death

OPE

OUSE

(Continued from Page 1)
nothing more than inflammation
or clotting of a vein, according
to Coon, and is not uncommon,
particularly with advancing
age. The doctor said the dis-
ease may become fatal when,
a blood clot formed elsewhere
in the body - most often in a
leg - becomes dislodged and
travels to the lungs.
There it becomes a deadly
new clot, known as an embo-
lism. According to Coon, the
likeliness of fatality varies with
the patient's age. Nixon is 61.
The causes of the disease are
frequently difficult to pinpoint,
and it sometimes seems to ap-
pear for no reason. It is be-
lieved to be linked to other dis-
orders of the circulatory sys-
tem. Other possible causes may*
be a sharp blow to an area, or
long periods of bedrest or in-
activity, Coon said.C
THERE are two types of
Phlebitis - "superficial" and

"deep". Coon said that of the
two, deep phlebitis is more dan-
gerous, and it carries a heavier
chance of causing an embolism.
According to Coon, the pain
associated with phlebitis "var-
ies greatly all over the lot . . .
some cases can be quite un-
comfortable," and can go
through lengthy "smoldering
and lingering" - as is Nixon's.
Coon cited the usual symp-
toms of phlebitis as pain in the
infected area, swelling and
sometimes an inability to put
weight on the affected leg.
Doctors normally treat phle-
bitis with anti-coagulant drugs,
whose purpose is to cut down'
on the capacity of the body for
blood clotting.
Coon warned that such treat-
ment is not without risks, since
it does weaken the body's ca-r
pacity to defend itself if the
need for clotting arises.
The American Association of
Blood Banks, a nonprofit asso-
ciation, is the world's largest
organization devoted exclusive-
ly to blood banking and trans-
fusion services.

AP Photo
The latest news
A disabled veteran of South Vietnam's army reads a local newspaper which he pulled from
the flames as Saigon police attempted to confiscate a press run of the pacifist-oriented daily.
The staff of the newspaper, Dai Dan Toc, burned the copies before police had a chance to
take them.
HITS MILLIKEN, LEVIN:

H RP's

Fereney describes

556 S. STATE ST.

(near the Union)

his opposition as evasive

761-8282

FRI., Sept. 20-SUN.,

Sept. 29-7

p.m. to

10 p.m.

By CHERYL PILATE !
During one of his last cam-
paign appeaarnces in theAnn
IArbor a r e a, Human Rights
P a r t y (HRP) gubernatorial
candidate Zolton Ferency yes-
terday attacked his Democratic
and Republican opponents for
faiing to confront the issues.
Addressing two University po-
litical science classes, Ferency'
said that today's voter has been
"manipulated by money and
electronics."

q owou rrIErtwww Aig .Y+ rr

during his brief speech, Ferency
explained to the audience of,
about 150 the techniques used!
to enhance a candidate's image.
"How a candidate looks and'
appears is largely determined
by information derived fromr
polls," he said. "This sort of
projected imagery is what de-
stroys political leadership-no
one is willing to take a strong
position on arcontroversial sub-
ject for fear of alienating a E
large chunk of voters."
POINTING out t h a t both
Democratic gubernatorial can-
didate Sander Levin and Gover-
nor William Milliken anticipate
spending $750,000 on their cam-
paigns, Ferency said a majorI
chunk of their funds is allocated
to media exposure and image-
shaping.

"Money has become a very
important ingredient in politics
today," he commented. "If you
don't have a lot of it, you're at
a severe disadvantage."
Following his informal ad-
dress, Ferency fielded questions
from the audience on a wide
range of topics.
"THIS campaign is going bet-
ter than we expected," he
noted with a laugh. "If we get
10 per cent -of the vote, it will
be a major victory-if we get
15 per cent, it will be a land-
slide and we'll have an inaugu-
ration party."
Ferency, who is making his
third bid for the governover-
ship, founded the statewide HRP
in 1971 after falling into dis-
favor with the Democratic party
for his strong anti-war senti-
ments.

"NO MATTER how long you
ANTIQUE S " listen to the major parties you
MARCH 1 3 THRU 17 don't really know where they
stand," he asserted.
Hopskotching from campaignE
I fundraising techniques to the
role of professional polltakersi
;I

a film

Probably not. All things considered you do
what you do pretty doggone well. After all, no one
has taken your job. And you're eating regularly.
But...
But have you ever considered what doing your
job just a little better might mean?
Money. Cold hard coin of the realm.
If each of us cared just a smidge more about
what we do for a living, we could actually turn that
inflationary spiral around. Better products, better
service and better management would mean savings
for allof us. Savings of much of the cash and frayed
nerves it's costingus now for repairs and inefficiency.
Point two..By taking more pride in our work
we'll more than likely see America regaining its
strength in the competitive world trade arena. When
the balance of payments swings our way again we'll
all be better off economically.
So you see-the only person who can really

Natural Science Aud.
Ann Arbor
Sat., Sept. 21
7 P.M.; 9:30 P.M.
$1.50
Sponsored By: Siddha Yoga Dham
For The Festival Of Life
jI
HOW IS
SYOUR
DELIVERY?)
Is delivery of THE DAILY acceptable?
We hope so!

A 0
MLD
THRU THE
1 u JNU
e D

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11

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