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September 20, 1974 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-20

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, September 20, 1974

, .

Aborigines

PROGRAM FAILS
pushed

By GARRETT JONES
SYDNEY (Reuter)-An Aus-
tralian government attempt to
push a small group of aborigines
into the 20th Century has ended
in failure and disillusion, drunk-
enness and violence.
For 40,000 years aborigines in
the Gulf of Carpenteria, North
Australia have lived and hunted
happily. Their routine inter-
rupted only by the trek into
dreamtime (death).
NOW IN less than two years
the aboriginal community at
Umbakumba on Groote Eylandt,
a small island about 50 miles
long standing 20 miles off the
North Australian coast, has
foundered on the social ills of
boredom, violence and alcohol-
ism.
Umbakumba is the pilot pro-
ject for self-determination for
Australias 60,000 outback ab-
origines. The scheme aims at
finding their place in Australian
society in the next half century.
The ruling Australian Labor
Party gave Umbakumba the
right to make its own decisions
in December, following riots

over demands for increased original Affairs,

Senator Jim

rights for aborigines, which re-
sulted in 27 people being jailed.
BUT TODAY the 368 aborig-
ines in the commuity are dis-
illusioned and unhappy.
Government policy has seen
the traditional tribal society of
the aborigines broken down and
replaced by new structures,
community and village councils
and a housing association, that
are meaningless to this cen-
turies-old race.
Elders have lost interest in
maintaining discipline. The
young men recently went on a
drunken rampage which caused
50,000 dollars damage to a com-
munity center.
TWO NURSING sisters resign-
ed, one after being threatened
with an ax. A construction com-
pany pulled out earlier this
month, claiming the lives of its
workers were endangered. An-
other company threatened to
abandon work on a new hospital
after one of its workers was
held at knifepoint.
Australias Minister for Ab-

Cavanagh, who inspected Um-
bakumba during a tour of
original settlements in the north,
admitted the government might
have moved too fast in giving
the aborigines self-determination
and more assistance than they
could cope with.
"It shows money is not the
only solution," he said.
AS A result of the drunken
sprees the government will prob-
ably send in a community ad-
viser as a practical move to try
to curb excesses.
But Cavanagh is worried that'
helping the aborigines in the
outback to return to their tra-
ditional ways could cut them off
from needed facilities and ham-
per the education of their
young.
While the government is will-
ing to finance aboriginal com-
munities with basic grants of
5,000 dollars, Cavanagh stressed
he would like to see more value
for money.

into present
department, for its loose hand- i and run by aborigines, have al-
ling of financial grants in help- so proved successful.
ing Australia's 106,000 aborig- Government officials, aware
ines. of setbacks to their self-deter-
But aboriginal leaders empha- mination policy, say only time
size that a two-way system is will tell if it is the right one.
needed under which aborigines
would be able to take what they
need from western culture while
maintaining much of their own. Be careful with fire:
As an example they point to There are babes
the Pintubis aborigines at Yai+ h
Yai, about 155 miles west of, nthe woods.
Alice Springs in Central Aus-
tralia where aborigines who
have left the main settlement
at Papunya to establish their
own village, are drawing on;
such props of white society as
medical and health care, while
living a more traditional life.
ADVISORS say they have re-
gained their self-respect and
look to the future with more con-
fidence, in stark contrast to
Papunya where morale is low
and drunken brawls are fre-
quent. /

i~:
'o c..ptu r' -
THM W N9ON GALZMT

-°-----. . J

Curative Education
OF THE

Mentally Handicapped Child
based on Rudolf Steiner's view
of the spiritual nature of man
A PUBLIC LECTURE by

MICHAEL WILSON

founder of the Sunfield Home, England
FRIDAY, SEPT. 20
8:00 p.m.
Henderson Room, Michigan League

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

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HIS department recently came In the northern territory,
under strong criticism, in a re- cattle stations, bought by gov-
port by the auditor-general's ernment money but managed

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'Advl~sirngcw*66%dfor the pubk opod.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Friday, September 20 Optical & Radio Data," P & A Col-
loq. Rmn., 4 pm.
Day Calendar Music School: Air Force Band of
WUOM: Dr. Geo. Wald, prof. of i Washington D.C., Colonel Arnold
biol., Harvard, & winner, 1967 No- Gabriel, conductor, Hill Aud., 8 pm.
bel Prize in medicine, presents General Notices
"One with the Universe" & "The ATT. STUDENTS: Today, Sept. 20,
Origins of Life", from 1971 Massey 5 pm, is last date for Fall Term
Lecture series,: .. . Therefore when Registrar's Ofc. will accept
Choose Life," 10:05 am. 100 per cent Withdrawal Notice for
H o s p i t a 1 Commission for refund purposes (excluding $50 dis-
Women Meeting: W10410 Hosp., enrollment fee) & permit refund
noon. to students reducing hours of
Educ. Media Ctr.: A-V Ctr., course credit; October 18, 5 pm, is
What's New at School?, Schorling last date for Fall Term when Regis-
Aud., SEB, noon. trar will allow refund for 50 per
Engineering: Helmut Knapp, cent Withdrawal.
Tech. U. of Berlin, "Measurements CEW: 20 CEW Scholarships, $500-
of Solid-Liquid Phase Equilibria," $2000, open to women whose edu-
336 W. Eng., 4 pm. cation has been interrupted at least
Physics: F. Gilman, Stanford Li- { 12 consecutive mos. & who seek a
near Accelerator Ctr., "Status of degree at U-M; applications avail-
Current and Constituent Quarks,"" able at Ctr, Oct. 2, 1974 & due
2038 Randall Lab, 4:15 pm. Jan. 20, 1975; announcement of
A s t r o n o m y Colloquium: winners, April 24, 1975. For more
Dr. Theodore Gull, Kitt Peak Natl .info contact 330 Thompson St.,
Obs., "Models of M42 and M17 from 764-6555, 763-1353.

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Bring me inI
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40% OFF LIST ON ANY LP &
25% OFF ON ANY TAPE. 6 to
midnite on Sept. 20th at our
1235 S. University store only!
668-9866
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CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
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CLASSIFIED ADS - 764-0557
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY-12:00 p.m.
DISPLAY ADS -764-0554
MONDAY thru FRIDAY-12 p.m.-4 p.m.
Deadline for Sunday issue-
THURSDAY at 5 p.m.
DEADLINE 2 days in advance by 3 p.m.
Friday at 3 p.m. for Tuesday's paper

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at HILLEL-1429 Hill.St.
SUNDAY, Sept. 22, 1974
COST, ONLY $1.25

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