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September 20, 1974 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-20

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Friday, September 20, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, September 20, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PaQe Nine

T

7U

Lytl
By JEFF SCHILLER
Bo Schembechler's teams
pride themselves on execution.
There is no room for mistakes
and steady performance is pre-
ferable to inconsistent brilli-
ance. It's hard for an under-
classman to establish himself
in an atmosphere like that, and
it's especially difficult when he
is a tailback on a squad which
boasted three of the league's
top four tailbacks last season
and enjoys the return of all ofI
them. But then, Rob Lytle is
no ordinary underclassman.
Lytle made himself known to
Michigan fans last Saturday
against Iowa by gaining 86
yards while playing only half
the game. But football insiders
have known about the 6'1", 190
lb. sophomore since his high
school days when he was one of
the most sought-after recruits

e

pa

sses first
knit bunch of guys. too. There's no hard feelings
And the Wolverines are al- between us because Gordie and
ready reaping the rewards. The I have a great relationship. We
possessor of 9.6 speed in the 100 both just go out and do the
yard dash as well as the mus- best job we can."

Daily
Sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
LEBA HERTZ

t,

in the country.;
AFTER BEING PURSUED
by everyone in the Big 10, the
Big 8, the Pac 8, and many oth-
ers, Lytle narrowed the field to
Michigan, Ohio State, and Pur-
due, ultimately choosing Ann
Arbor.
"It was a combination of
things. I liked the school and
Coach Schembechler of course,:
but what really impressed me ;
was the closeness of the team.
They really seemed like a tight-,

cle to run inside, Lytle is cut
from the classic tailback mold.
At most schools with lesser tal-
ent, the big publicity "All-
America hoopla" would be in
high gear, - but here at Michi-
gan, Rob is forced to share not
only the press releases with the
likes of Franklin, Heater, Chap-
man, Brown, etc. but also his
tailback position with last year's
sophomore sensation Gordon
Bell. His attitude seems realis-
tic.
"Sure, I'd like to be play-
ing all the time", Lytle com-
mented "but Gordie Bell is a
good football player who does
a great job for us, and I know1
he'd like to play all the time,

Franklin starts
Good news emitted from
Michigan's practice ses-
sion yesterday. Dennis
Franklin will be ready for
the Wolverines b a t t I e
against Colorado Saturday.
Franklin worked ex-
tensively with the first
unit yesterday, and ap-
peared to be back in the
form that gained him the
nickname "Dennis the
Menace."

I--

test
"You know", he added, "that
two of our substitutes last year,
Larry Cipa and Bob Thorn-
bladh made their pro rosters
and Don Coleman (semi-regu-
lar defensive end) beat out
Rick Middleton of Ohio State
who was an All-America last
year for the starting linebacker
spot on the Saints.
"I DON'T KNOW how many
guys are affected by the
crowd", he commented, "and I
suppose I won't know for sure
until I go down there, but in
general, the opposition's booing
gets me up. For them to boo
you, you know you have to have
done something well whereas
the home crowd will cheer for
almost anything."
The coaches are very high on
Rob's future and certainly
Maize and Blue fans came
away from the Iowa game with
a favorable first impression. It
remains only for Lytle to prove
his consistency, but even that
is not in much doubt. After all,
he cracked Bo's lineup, didn't
he?

LYTLE ALSO offered an in-
sight into the attitude of this
year's team, "I think we have
something to prove after the
Athletic Directors' vote last

.__.
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BUCS CLOSE IN:
Yanlks

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Doily Photo by KEN FINK

Lytle

tortures

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split

wide to the left

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3

- - - ~~Clarke cogsdill .....5
I'm a sportswt ...
.. . not a salesman
IS SPORTSWRITING journalism?
That's not exactly the burning question of our times. The
media-whatever the hell we are-catch most of our criticism for
the way we handle the really important stories: Watergate, in-
flation, amnesty, The Pardon, the latest AP cheesecake shot of
a semi-nude teenaged Australian female on a deserted beach
just north of Sydney, those clowns in the state legislature, those!
clowns on the City Council, those Wall Street geniuses who
blame e' rything on "continual high interest rates and a general
lack of confidence" when they (of all people) should know'
better, and so on.
All of this distracts peoples' attention from how we, the
sports media, happen to be treating our favorite subject. That's
a serious oversight. Sports, as a set of cultural phenomena
which manage to rivet the attention of tens of millions of people
for extended periods of time, is clearly important to The way in
which this country lives. And since most people rely on the
media to provide their day-to-day contact with the sports world,
the job the media does is important, too.
Minds in Columbus which have never heard of Eric Severeid
are warped daily by the poorly-concealed snake-oil peddling of
Paul Horning onrthe sports page. This is an extreme example,
but it is not as rare as it should be.
In executive suits throughout the country, the overfed
barons of sport know darn well that the friendly neighbor-
hood sportswriter-no one seems to remember his name but
everyone agrees he's, a great guy-will throw in a nice bit3
of publicity, disguised as a feature story, or even (if he's
audacious) as friendly analysis, to hype the gate.
Economics, worse yet, favors the situation. Like all other
journalists, the sportswriter earns his living because people are
interested in the subject he covers. Therefore, anything that
increases fan interest in a sport, increases the job security of
the sports-scribe. If you don't believe this, just read *he latestj
prose from the pens of people - - _-__------ -

'. , By The Associated Press
NEW YORK -The defending
Baltimore Orioles completed aJ
" three-game sweep ofNew York
M a Q rLe u andmoved into first place in
the American League's East
Standinas Division last night, blanking the,
AMERICAN LEAGUE Yankees 7-0 behind Dave Mc-
East Nally's three-hit pitching.
Baltimore I 7L .53 GB McNally, 16-10, stifled the
New York 80 70 .533 A Yankees on three singles in
Boston 77 72 .517 3 winning his fourth consecu-
Cleveland 73 75 .493 614 tive game and eighth in 101
Milwaukee 72 78 .480 814iczJl 1.I a
Detroit 69 81 .460 i decisions since July 31. It Was
west the second shutout for the-
Oakland 85 66 .563 -- Orioles in the three-game
Texas 80 70 .533 41/ sep
Minnesota 77 74 .510 8
Yesterday's Results Don Baylor opened the scor-
Detroit 3, Boston 1 1 ing, smashing the first pitch of
Baltimore 7, New York 0 the fifth inning from Rudy May,
Kansas City 4, Oakland 3, 10 in.
Today's Games 6-4, far over the fence in left-
Cleveland (G. Perry 20-10) and center near the 371-foot sign
(F. Peterson 9-12) at New York for his ninth home run of the
(Tidrow 12-12) and (Gura 4-0), 2. season.
Baltimore (Grimsley 17-13) at
Boston (Drago 6-9), (n). Stargell socs
Detroit (olicha 16 18) at Mi- PITTSBURGH - Willie Star-
California Ryan (20-15) at Minne- gell hit a two-run double and
sota (Decker 15-12), (n). Richie Hebner added a three-
Kansas City (Fitin orris 11-6) at run homer, keying a seventh-
Texas (J. Brown 12-12), (n).,
Oakland (Abbott 5-5) or (Hamil- inning rally that lifted the
ton 6-4) at Chicago (B. Johnson Pittsburgh Pirates to an 8-6
8-4), (n). victory over the St. Louis Car-
NATIONAL LEAGUE dinals last night.
W L Pet. GB relief ace Al Hrabosky, who had
St. Louis 80 70 .533 --allowed only one earned run in
ttsbg 7970870 / his previous 26 appearances.
Montreal 71 78 .477 8/ .The victory moved the Pirates
New York 67 82 .450 12!4 within a half-came of the first-
Chicago 63 86 .423 164_ place Cardials in the National
Los Angeles Wet9 56 .624 - League East.

lose
he homers by Stargell and
ner in the five-run Pirate
ising both came off Cardinal
(ers Ruhie
OSTON-Right-hander Vern-
Ruhle pitched two-hit ball for
en innings in his first major
;ue start and veteran Al
ine closed in on 3,000 life-
s hits with a run-scoring sin-
lifting the Detroit Tigers
1 3-1 victory over the Boston
1 Sox last night.

lead
Ruhle, a 23-year-old gradu-
ate of Olivet College in Mich-
igan, beat Boston veteran
Luis Tiant, 20-13, who failed
for the sixth straight time to
gain his 21st victory.
Kaline, hoping to become only
the 12th player in baseball his-
tory to collect 3,000 hits, col-
lected his 2,997th when he sin-
gled home a run in the first
inning after Ron LeFlore sin-
gled and stole second.

season. To characterize it as re-
venge makes it too emotional,
but we do want to show every-
one just how good we are."

ALL-CAMPUS
PARTY
te::Sat.,Sept. 21 featuring
l4 ime: 8:00 p.m. CO Ok:
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1415 Cambridge 1 Admission
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SPECIAL ITEMS:
THURSDAY, SEPT. 19-MONDAY, SEPT. 23

1I

Cincinnati 91 59 .607 2%
Atlanta 83 68 .550 11
Houston 76 74 .507 17%
San Francisco 68 83 .450 26
San Diego 55 96 .364 39
Yesterday'saResults
Chicago 7, Philadelphia 4
Pittsburgh 8, St. Louis 6
San Diego at Los Angeles, inc.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, inc.
Today's Games
New York (Sadecki 8-8) at Pitts-
burgh (Brett 13-8), (n).
Chicago (Bonham 11-19) at St.
Louis (Forsch 5-4), (n).
Atlanta (P. Niekro 17-12) at
Houston (Richard 2-1), (n).
Philadelphiak(Carlton 14-12) at
Montreal (Repko 11-14), (n).
San Diego (McIntosh 0-3) at Los
Angeles (Messersmith 18-6), (n).
Cincinnati (Kirby 10-8) at San
Francisco (D'Acquisto 12-12), (n).

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whose employment depends on'
the survival of the Detroit
Wheels.
Frankly, I don't see what pur-
pose there is (for example) in
predicting championships for
the local teams when there's no
way they can achieve them by
any combination of talent and/
or luck. This only leads to dis-
illusioned fans, and undercuts
the business completely.
These aren't exactly new
points. Similar criticism of
journalism is almost as old as
the profession itself.
And that's the hell of it. Noth-
ing has been done. Even though
sportswriters know that wtli-
mately their lives depend upon
their being free agents, uncom-
mitted to the teams and indi-
viduals they write about, they
have failed to unite to do any-
thing substantive to improve
their situation.
Genuine s p o r t s journalism
would be a good thing for the
sportswriters, for their readers,
and ultimately even for the ath-
letes. Too bad there's so little
of it!

I

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