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September 20, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-20

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Friday, September 20, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Frdy Spebe}0 17 HEMC.GNDIL- aehe

-U

Boston school scene of
continued racial turmoil

BOSTON (AP) - Black-white
fighting broke out at one high
school, several persons were in-
jured when buses were stoned
and city officials ushered out-
side agitators out of the state
as Boston struggled with its
sixth day of busing to integrate
schools.
A neo-Nazi contingent from
Virginia was ushered out of the
state and a Ku KMux Klan or-
ganizer from Louisiana ran into
Sopposition from the city on his
plans to stage a Klan rally.
TWO STONING incidents were
reported after school in sep-
arate sections of the city, and
three students were reported
hurt. A shot reportedly was
fired at another school, but
there were no injuries in that
incident.
Fist fights between blacks and
whites also broke out yesterday
afternoon in Mattapan Square,
about a mile from Hyde Park
High School.
At the Hyde Park High School,
shoving began when there were
not enough seats in the cafe-
teria, a mayor's office spokes-
= person said.
"THERE was extensive dis-
ruption," the spokesperson said.
"The disturbance centered on
the lunch room. There was food
and tray throwing."
The high school is in a white
Imiddle class neighborhood on
the southern edge of Boston, and
is several miles from South
Boston where most of the dis-
ruption has occurred since bus-

ing began under a federal court
order.}
Blacks and whites fought each
other along the school corri-
dors. A 17-year-old white stu-
dent was treated at a hospital
for minor injuries.
THE fighting spread into the
school yard as buses were called
in early to pick up the black
students. Police moved in to
quell the disturbance. There
'were no arrests.
In one bus stoning incident,
a black student required facial
stitches after bus windows were
smashed by white youths in
Hyde Park the mayor's office
said. In another, a 16-year-oldj
white student was slightly in-
jured when the bus he was
riding in was stoned by blacks
in the Dorchester section.
A group of neo-Nazis was
ushered out of the state yester-
day after it was involved in a
confrontation in South Boston.
Seven ,members of the Na-
tional Socialist White People's
party based in Arlington, Va.,
rode about the city in a van,
the mayor's office said.
The men, dressed in Nazi-
like uniforms decorated with
swastikas were ordered by
Police Commissioner Robert di-

Grazia to leave "for their own
protection," after they got into
an argument with a small group
of white youths. They left the
city under state police escort.
A spokesman for the party
said they had gone to Boston in
response to appeals from anti-
busing forces.
A Ku Klux Klan leader said
yesterday that his followers
were recruiting membersain
Boston. David Duke, 24, grand
dragon of the Knights of Klu
Klux Klan in Louisiana, said at
an airport news conference that
out-of-state Klansmen are "be-
ing received with tremendousj
enthusiasm . . . like saviors."

DICK GRIFFEY presents:
THE 1974 STEVE WONDER FALL TOUR
STEVIE WONDER
WITH
Wonderlove
PLUS
The Commodores
FRI., SEPT. 27-830 P.M.
at
OLYMPIA STADIUM
TICKETS: $7.50, 6.00
Tickets At-Olympia, Grinnell's & Hudson s
MC ... Honored at Olympia

5920
Grand River

OLYMPIA STADIUM
(313) 895-7000

Detroit
48202

I I

AP Photo
Getting ready for "war"
Kootenai Indian tribal member Rex Trice enters the Kootenai Tribal office in Bouners Fer-
ry, Idaho, carrying one of the signs the tribe is preparing for its "war" with the United
States. Tribal members say they will close the boundaries of land they claim in northern
Idaho and western Montana unless Federal officials begin work on a treaty with the tribe
by midnight last night. They plan to charge the 10-cent .toll on all cars passing through their
territory, tribal members say.

1

Hunger: Old enemy
still plagues India
SIULI BARI VILLAGE, India HUNGER, the centuries old
(P) - Adary Mal hunched low to enemy of India, also has at-
prepare the main course for her tacked thousands of similar vil-
family's only meal of the day. lages in West Bengal, Gujarat,
It was a wad of weeds. Orissa, Bihar Rajasthan and
BESIDE her squatted one of Maharashtra states.
her six children rummaging Despite official expectations
through a handful of snails that hunger can be beaten,
hunted in the fields to give the Prime Minister Indira Gandhi
family protein. is reported to be sounding out
"I am eating these things the United States, Russia and
every day," said Dukhu Mal, Western Europe for emergency
gesturing at his wife's weeds. food aid to contain the crisis.
"What else can I eat? I have President Ford told the United
no choice. Look at my skin. Nations on Wednesday that
Look at my bones." Washington w o u l d cooperate
His stomach puckered around with a proposed worldwide sys-
the navel and his voice was a tem of stockpiling food for
weak whine, as he told how emergencies, and that the Unit-
hunger has taken over this vil- ed States would increase food
lage of 150 families about 170 'aid to needy nations to relieve
miles northwest of Calcutta. hunger in the world.

RALPH HERBERT
Director, U of M Opera Productions
PAUL BOYLAN
Director of Interlochen
in
"SONGS BY BRAHMS AND SCHUBERT"
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

8:00 P.M.

ADMISSION FREE

SARAH HERSHEY, Pianist
NANCY WARING, Flutist
in a JOINT RECITAL
SATURDAY, SEPT. 22 AT 3:00 P.M.
at the
UNION GALLERY
1st FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNION

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104

WASHERS & DRYERS
NO WAITING!

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OPEN 24 HOURS
ATTENDANT ALWAYS
ON DUTY
MR. STADIUM
COIN LAUNDRY &
DRY CLEANING
1958 S. INDUSTRIAL
South of E. Stadium Blvd.
668.7928

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Included are selections from:
REISENSTEIN
HEIDEN
PISTON

SCHUBERT
CHOPIN
BRAHMS

NO ADMISSION CHARGE

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people wh can:

Beta
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Theta
U
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Pi
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a film

E
604
S. STATE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
BAND STARTS AT 9:00

Natural Sicence Aud.
Ann Arbor
Sat., Sept. 21
7 P.M.; 9:30 P.M.
$1.50
Sponsored By: Siddha Yoga Dham
For The Festival Of Life

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UNIVERSITY THEATRE PROGRAMS announces
4 DISTINGUISHED PRODUCTIONS
in the POWER CENTER for the Performing Arts

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OCTOBER 9-12

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----DECEMBER 4-7

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