100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 17, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 17, 1974

.sor defen- ds Nixon pa rdon

(Continued from Page 1) j
erthrow of Chilean president
Salvador Allende despite recent
congressional disclosures the
CIA financed overt operations in
that country. Ford said U. S.
efforts in that instance were to
help preserve news media and
political parties opposed to Al-
lende. Ford wouldn't debate the
constitutional issues involved,
saying it is "a recognized fact
that such actions are undertak-
en" by nations and that Com-
munist countries "spend vastly
more money than" we do for
such purposes."
0 A "very major decision"
will be made in a few days on
U. S. fooid aid to countries hit
hard by drought and starva-
tion. He said he hopes the Unit-
ed States "will be able to in-
crease its contribution" to help
ease suffering.
FORD TOLD the nationally
broadcast and televised news
conference that he had no sec-
ret reasons for pardoning Nix-
on.
". .. I decided that we could
not afford in America an ex-
tended period of continued tur-
moil . . ." Ford said.
He said that is why he re-
versed the stand announced at
his first White House news con-
ference on Aug. 28 that it would
be untimely to make any par-
don commitment before any
judicial proceedings had been
undertaken in Nixon's case.
Ford said, following that news
conference, he asked his coun-
sel to research what pardoning
wpowers he had and determined
Iwhat information was in the
hands of the prosecutors.
IT BECAME clear, Ford said,
"that the President might be
charged with obstruction of jus-
tick" and 10 other counts. He
said he was told it might be a
year or more before Nixon
could be brought to trial.
"I then began to evaluate in
my own mind" his action par-
doning Nixon, Ford said.
"The main concern that I had
at the time I made the deci-
sion was to heal the wounds

throughout the United States,"
he said.
"AT THE same time the Unit-
ed States had major problems
both at home and abroad that
needed the maximum personal
attention of the President and
the country. It seemed to me
that as long as the divisiveness
and turmoil existed," he said,
the wounds would not heal.
"I was more anxious to heal
the nation," Ford said. "That
was the top consideration."
While also concerned for Nix-
on's health, Ford said the ma-
jor reason was "to heal the
wounds."
ASKED WHY he decided
abruptly on a Sunday morning
on the pardon, Ford replied, "I
didn't decide abruptly." He said

he "most carefully analyzed
the situation in the country"
and determined that America
could not afford "a continued
period of turmoil."
Asked about his statement at
his confirmation hearings that
the country wouldn't stand for
a President failing to support
prosecution of a former presi-
dent if it became necessary,
Ford said, "I was asked a hy-
pothetical question."
"Now that I'm in the White
House and don't have to answer
hypothetical questions but have1
to deal with reality, it was my
judgment . . . that it was in
the best interests of the United
States that I take the action I
did.
"I must say the decision has

created more antagonism than
I anticipated," Ford said. "But
as I look over the long . . . the
possibility of a former presi-
dent being in the dock so to
speak . . . it seems to me if I
had the choice between that pos-
sibility and the possibility of
taking direct action . . . I'm still
convinced that despite the pub-
lic reaction, the aecision I made
was the right one."
Resist the temptation to over-
buy if yon want to save money.
Even canned foods lost flavor
and texture in time. Fresh
vegetables and fruit are per-
ishable and spoiled food wastes
money.

iDA

AP Photo
PRESIDENT FORD admits at last night's press conference at the White House that Nixon's acceptance of a presidential
pardon "could be construed" as an admission of guilt on the part of the former president. Ford also told the reporters that
the pardon itself will be read "by many if not all" as tantamount to a plea of guilty.

B.

EZ

BANKS, MEANS FREED:

dge
(Continued from Page 1)
decision on an appeal would bej
up to the appellate division of
the solicitor general's office in
the Justice Department.
"WE PROBABLY won't do
anything until we get the judge's
written opinion,' Hurd said.
The defense team of five law-
yers and Means and Banks and
their AIM sympathizers hugged
each other during an exuberant
news conference outside the
courthouse.
Defense attorney William Kun-'
stler told the throng: "I think
today was a blow for freedom
for everyone. If this isn't a
clear warning that someone
must begin the cleansing pro-
cess in America, then I don't
know what a clear warning is."
KUNSTLER said the ruling
was made by a judge who was
"converted during an eight-
month trial." Courtroom out-
bursts by defense attorneys
drew criticism from Nichol
several times and Kunstler and
fellow defense lawyer Mark
Lane were jailed for 20 hours
last month for persisting in ar-
guing with Nichol.I
Nichol had criticized the De-
partment of Justice, particularly
the FBI, earlier in the trial. He
said Monday that one of the
reasons he was finding miscon-
duct was the department's re-
fusal to consent to the smaller
panel.
"In my opinion, the Depart-3
ment of Justice should have
sought justice in this case by
permitting it to go to the jury
rather than deny that justice
because they refused to accept
the unanimous verdict of an 11-
member jury," he said.
NICHOL criticized the gov-
einment for its handling of its'

clears AIM

heads

in

chief rebuttal witness, Louis
Moves Camp, 22, of Rapid City,
S.D. Nichol called it "probobly
the most bizarre incident in
the trial.
The judge said that testimony
showed Moves Camp was taken
to what he called a "plush re-
sort" near Hudson, Wis., and
"they gave him the royal treat-
ment. I didn't realize the FBI
was stooping so low. If they
were protecting him, I didn't
see protection that way."
Nichol said Moves Camp got
involved with a high school stu-
dent one night and that a few
hours later she requested that
rape charges be filed. The
county prosecutor at River
Falls, Wis., has not filed the
charges, however.
THE GOVERNMENT charged
that some 200 AIM members and
sympathizers in a caravan of
cars seized Wounded Knee,
breaking into and raiding the
Trading Post and hauling food
and other supplies to Sacred
Heart Catholic church, a quar-
ter-mile away. Prosecutors also
said that three houses opposite
the store were seized as head-
quarters for AIM leaders.
AIM spokespeople claimed
most local residents were being1
persecuted by Tribal Chairman
Richard Wilson and the Bureau4
of Indian Affairs on the reser-
vation. They said the Oglala
Sioux Civil Rights Organization
invited them to the reservation.
A force of some 200 FBI men
and agents manned roadblocks
and bunkers on hillsides as the
stalemate continued.
Government negotiators met
with Indians at a variety of
sites, but failed to arrange a
settlement until May 8 when, as
food grew short and the oc-

cupying force dwindled, the re- leaders are scheduled for trial
maining protesters surrendered. later.
SEVEN MEN were indicted as The government indicted some
alleged leaders of the occupa- 130 persons all told in the
tion. Trial of Means and Banks !WoundedKe cuain
came first. Another defendant W o u n d e d Knee occupation.
Pedro Bissonette, died last Oc- Thirty-4ne cases were disposed
tober in a confrontation with a of at Sioux Falls, S.D., or Lin-
BIA policeman. Four other coln, Neb.
CitCouncRl holds
ueventulmetin

Concert
FRIDAY
Sept. 27
8:00 P.M.
CRISLER
ARENA

At a low-key City Council nance to incr
meeting held last night, Mayor ment bond in
James Stephenson called for the per cent.
"help of all' our citizens" to ASSISTANT
recommend possible uses for Bruce Laidlam
community development funds. "Those who b
The city is applying for a pos- plan approva
sible $12 million grant from the cedure is ani
Department of Housing and tool may soo
Urban Development, to be paid awakening" -
over a six year period under several suits
t h e Community Development by builders c
Act. The mayor is soliciting cit- lidity of the s
izen's proposals through letters. City Admin
COUNCIL last night passed: Murray brou
-a resolution to acept a bid attention that
of $166,396 for a "thin overlay" ing to builda
of city streets; rant on Broad
-a resolution to raise water a lawsuit ag
service connection charges; being deniedt
-a first reading of an ordi- ing to build.
nance to require the licensing of Stephenson
alarm companies; and the issue at
-the first reading of an ordi- tive session"

ease special assess-
interest rates to 9
C i t y Attorney
m, warned council:
believe that the site
d or rejection pro-
unlimited planning
on receive a rude
- in reference to
against the city
hallenging the va-
ite plan process.
nistrator Sylvester
ght it to council's
t the parties seek-
a Bonanza Restau-
dway have brought
ainst the city after
the necessary zon-
moved to discuss
a "special execu-
at a later date.

Abortion Alternative
OFFERED BY
Problem Pregnancy
Help
24 hr. phone: 769-7283
Office: 400 S. Division
Main floor, Street entrance
(corner of William)
FREE PREGNANCY TESTING

RESERVED SEATS $3.50
Tickets go on Sale Wednesday, 10 a.m.

Michigan Union

Box Off ice

li

u

II

',
I

14

WASHERS & DRYERS
NO WAITING!

'4.

OPEN 24 HOURS
ATTENDANT ALWAYS
ON DUTY
MR. STADIUM
COIN LAUNDRY &
DCRY CLEANING
1958 S. INDUSTRIAL
South of E. Stadium Blvd.
668.7928

A ATTENTION:
ALL OLD MEMBERS
(YELLOW AND ABOVE)
U of M TAE KWON DO CLUB.
Organizational Meeting
Wed., Sept. 18-7:00 p.m.
1026 VAUGHN, NO. 5
662-6831

K.E.I. MARTIAL ARTS STUDIO
OFFERS
* Group (coed) and private instruction in
Okinawan Shorinryu Karate.
* Morning, afternoon, evening classes to suit
your schedule.
217 E. WASHINGTON-994-3620
ECO-FLIGHT SYSTEMS, Inc.
2275 S. State St.
HANG-GLIDERS, PARTS, KITS,
MOVIES, AND SKY SCHOOL
FLY A HANG-GLIDER THIS FALL
994-9020
ATHENIAN
IESTA-URANT
Auzth entic
Greek Food
MOUSSAKA (a la minute) $1.75
Fresh Eqqplant, Ground Beef and Lamb with
Bechomel Saucq
SOUVAKI------ --..-.-$1.75
With Rice or French Fries
Combination

CELLAR

111

SAVE on
CLASSICAL RECORDS
List Price Our Price
5.98 3.95
6.98 4.75
7.98 5.50
many DOG at $4.15-most Odyssey, Seraphim
and Victrolas at $1.95

r
s t ; 4
Li't , .,

for GOV.

1. SANDER LEVI N will be at the
Law Quad Main Lounge on Wed-
nesday, Sept. 18 at 2 p.m. to talk
with students and faculty.
7_ MAASMEETING ofiinteresRted

I ! t i

. ,

t11:

A,, 4- .^ rv r r r^ r-ti /-, r r /-"t ; r^ /\ /'1 I Y i r- 4- r, Y I /- n c- !ll in r T n c- Y I rn m n r

[11

11

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan