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September 11, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-11

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 11, 1974

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-i

- -,;;.

Tradition

threatened

i'f games a
By BRIAN DEMING is being threatened. Beginning
Once upon a time there was Saturday, a women's pom-pom
the Men's Union at Michigan. squad composed of ten mem-
Women weren't allowed through bers, composed mainly of bas-
the front door. Then, not so long ketball cheerleaders, and in-
ago there was an illustrious cluding Clare Canham, daughter
band known as the "MarchingI of Athletic Director Don Can-
Men of Michigan." Both are ham, will make their initial
memories, along with most all- appearance at Michigan Sta-
male institutions of the Michigan dium.
campus as the female segment
has breached a majority of the BUT FEAR NOT loyal fans
barriers guarding what once nurtured by the masculine
was religiously respected as chorus of "Let's go Blue" rising
"for men only." spontaniously from the men in
And now, with the introduction maize. Take heart football lov-
of the women's pompom squad ers whose spine tingles at the
to the Michigan football spec- sight of backflips off the wall
tacle, the sacred tradition of at the stadium performed byI
all-male football cheerleaders none other than the men cheer-'

Id

pom

sigma chapter
presents
comedian
IN
CONCERT

leaders. The pom-pom squad
will not accompany the men in
their routine of cheers or gym-
nastics.
Pat Perry, Coach of the wom-
en's squad, assures that the
women will perform exclusively
with the band and not with the
men cheerleaders. The women
will accompany the band at
halftime and will perform on the
sidelines during the game when-
ever the band strikes up.
So, apparently, as sophomore
squad member Debbie Connell
states, "There are strictly twoI
separate squads."
The move to create an oppor-
tunity for women to take a more
active role in the sideline ac-
IS
-I

poms
tivities came when the Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Ath-
letics voted in favor of the
pom-pom squad last spring.
"TRADITION HAS broken
down," Coach Perry remarked.
"It was just a matter of which
year."
Just what the reaction to the
innovation will be will be seen
Saturday. Pom-pommer Connell
is confident the response will be
cheers and not tomatoes. After
all, "We're not really breaking
tradition."
Perhaps it's just the start of
a new tradition and someday the
pom-pom squad will be as fa-
miliar as "The Victors," and
Boone's Farm. But until then
it just may not seem the same
at the ol' stadium.
STARTING LINEUP
Pam Ambler Junior
Rhonda Busbee Sophomore
Clare Canham Senior
Barb Cherry Junior
Marlene Clarkston senior
Debbie Conneli Sophomore
Leslie Green Senior
Sharon Hamlett Junior
Dianne Mather Junior
Rochelle McCracklin Sophomore
U '1

INNER SPACE:
The Last Frontier
Experience Arica
Wed., Sept. 11
8 P.M.
Michigan Union
FREE

Al arrives in Zaire
Muhammed Ali kisses a Zaire girl as he disembarks from the D C-10 which carried him to Kinshasha, arriving well in advance
of his world heavyweight championship match this month ag ainst titleholder George Foreman. All has been training since
June 1 for the bout, and it could be his final title attempt. To beat Foreman, Ali claims, "you need the speed and hands of
a lightweight, and there isn't another heavyweight in history who can compare himself with one."

also
featuring

ABEttE

Sat. September 14
Hill Auditori qm 8 p.m.
Tickets $4,15 & $6

on sale at1
Michigan Union

Hudson's
Grinnel l's
Bop Shop
& Trotter House

Cllr..T -

.,
's

I 1
I./
- .. ain~a~s. n . a atr

CONCERT USHERS -
UAC-ICC-PROJECT COMMUNITY
1 974-75 CONCERT SERIES
New and Former Ushers Meeting
Thursday, September 12
12:15 p.m. or 5:15 p.m.
Arts Info Center-2nd Fl Union
This season's usher staff will be selected {
from those registered at this meeting.
ARTISTS-
Design the Logo for this year's
concert publicity ... Deadline for I
entries is Monday, Sept. 16.
Also, bring in samples of your
style for consideration on concert
poster work and newspaper adver-
tising.
Details at UAC Office, 2nd fl Michigan Union
(we pay our artists!)

A ussies
By RAY O'HARA
In the waters off Newport
Rhode Island yesterday, the
American 12-meter yacht Cour-
ageous soundly defeated her
Australian opponent Southern{
Cross in wind so light that it
sometimes threatened to disap-
pear entirely.
Sailing in the 22nd defense
of the America's Cup, the most
coveted prize in international
yacht racing, the American
yacht took advantage of wind
conditions which suited her
design much better than that1
of the Australian challenger.-
After starting only two seconds
apart Courageous steadily in-t
creased her lead over South-
ern Cross on every one of thea
six legs of the 24.3 mile
course, eventually winning by
over five minutes and half a
mile.<
With respected sailmaker Ted

winds that she demonstrated in The nature of the formula i;
the long, hard-fought struggle such that designers have flexi
with her American sister In- bility in the creation of eaci
trepid for the right to defend the yacht. They are all similar bu
Cup against the challenge from not identical. Southern Cross
down under. hull design is intended to giv
With yesterday's victory her an advantage sailing wit
the Americans have taken a the wind while Courageous is
1-0 lead in the best-of-seven her best when sailing a zig-za
series to decide the fate of cousretoward the wind or
the 123 year-old silver prize sailing jargon, beatig.
which was first won by the Beating upwind is the mos
yacht America off the Isle of important part of an Amer
Wight in England in 1851. ica's Cup race since the up
Despite the- defeat the Aus- wind legs of the course r
tralians -still have hope, how- quire the longest time to sai
ever. The progress ofy tropical The yacht which is ahead o
storm Elaine up the Atlantic an upwind leg will attempt t
coast promises to bring heavier remain between the trail
seas and stronger winds to Long yacht and the wind, thereb
Island Sound later in the week. causing cross currents in th
Heavier conditions will be just air as it flows off the leader
what Aussie skipper Jim Hardy sails and frustrating the e
and owner Alan Bond, who has forts of the trailing yacht t
sunk more than eight million catch up. The trailing yach
dollars into Southern Cross, need must try to tack away fro
the leader ands n
to counter the light wind design air.ino l

in

first race

Courageous ou(strips

this concert is
IIAT -1)X

'I

ii.__ --

Hood at the helm Courageous
showed the same liking for light

___ _

________________________________ di
ill
II

Study Aid:

advantage enjoyed by the Amer-
icans.
America's Cup races are
sailed in 12-meter yachts.
These are large boats, built
only for racing, which derive
their name from a formula
which regulates their con-
struction. Certain of the
yacht's key dimensions such
as sail area, length and hull
shape are plugged into this
formula to yield a value no
greater than 12 meters.

The Austrailians are not neai
ly as experienced in the clos
infighting that the upwind leg
demand as their American cour
terparts. Consequently the Aui
sies hope to make up the dii
ference and take the lead whe
they are sailing with the win
behind them. Southern CrosE
however, is definitely not de
signed for sailing in light winds
as yesterday's debacle clearl
illustrated. Whether the Austrs
Bans can defeat Courageous i
more reasonable wind condition
is still a very open question.

SUNBEAM
INT CI IAT

4
' OTMgi ii
)
I II

4
I
i
i
f
{
!f

II

Hot Beverage Maker
Heats water for eye-open-
ing coffee, tea or soup.
Great for the dorm.

( - -

1"

The University of Michigan

I
i

"MICHIGANESIAN" Yearbook
next Thursday, Sept. 12, 7 p.m.
at the

if

Student Publications Bldg., 420 Maynard
EVERYONE WELCOME!!
WE NEED Photographers, Writers,

1

1111

3

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