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September 06, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sund©y, September 6, 1970'

Sunday. Seotember 6. 1970 ~

II E

FOR UNIVERSITY
PEOPLE WHO CARE
WE NOW HAVE
4 SHOPS TO SERVE YOU
0 ARBORLAND
* MAPLE VILLAGE
* LIBERTY OFF STATE
* EAST UNIV. OFF SO. UNIV.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS

Bo unimpressed by scrimmage

SGET,
AltENTION

t

DONTOWN
HDA

By MORT NOVECK
Michigan's football team held
its first scrimmage of the season
yesterday afternoon at the sta-
dium, and while the offense man-
aged to amass 27 points Iagainst
the defense, head coach Bo Sch-
embechler was not excited about
what he saw.
"The defense is progressing as
we h a d holed," he commented,
"but the offense is not keeping
up.
Schembechler's main source of
concern with the offense was with
its running game. Except for a
few good runs by quarterback Don
Moorhead, tailback Preston Hen-
ry and rare flashes from the same
Billy Taylor that played last year,
the offense had trouble moving
the ball on the ground.
THIS DIFFICUTLY is not due
to a lack of ability apcording to
the coach, but rather to a lack of
practice due to numerous injur-
ies in the offensive backfield.
Tailback Glenn Doughty did not
play at all and Taylor sat out the
last part of the scrimmage with
an injured foot.
Tailback Lance Scheffler, who
was injured in 1 a s t Thursday's
practice, missed the entire scrim-
mage as did wingback Randy Lo-
gan. Fullback Fritz Seyferth and
wingback Greg Harrison 'were in-
jured during yesterday's drills and
missed the later stages.
"We hope to develop a running

a t t a c k," Schembechler stated,
"but we can't have that until we
get our backfield.
There w e r e, however, a few
happy moments amid the gloom.
Bill Berutti, who has been switch-
ed from quarterback to wingback
twice already, impressed the coach
with the job he did after only
three day's, practice at wingback.
SCHEMBECHLER WAS pleased
with the work of tailback Henry
of whom he said, "Henry really
kept us in there." He was also
pleased with the way Paul Star-
oba played. "Staroba dropped the
first pass and I thought here we
go again," Schembechler com-
mented, "but he came back and
did a good job."
Offensive blocking has been a
concern of the coaches since prac-
tice started, but it neither impres-
sed nor depressed t h e m today..
"We didn't really have it tested
today," Schembechler stated.
WHILE HE THOUGHT the de-
fense was progessing, Schembech-
ler was far from satisfied. "We
really missed Tom Darden on de-
fense today," he mentioned.
After yesterday's scrimmage the
team gets today off before re-
turning for two sessions on Mon-
day. If enough players are healthy
the squad will scrimmage again
on Wednesday and t h e n again
next Saturday.

CB 100

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
PRESTON (44) HENRY slashes toward the line. Playing at tail-
back in the Wolverines' scrimmage yesterday, Henry was one of
the few bright spots in the running game. Henry replaced Glenn
Doughty, who has an injured knee.

'CYCLES * PARTS . ACCESSORIES

4

310 E. Washington

Ann Arbor

BIG ONES GET AWAY:
Cagers recruit needed guards.

Underground
at Shalom' House
Sunday, September 6
4-6:30 p.m.
Israeli and American
Folksingers
Free Coffee
Free Coke
6:30-8 p.m.
Deli at The Cellar
Fine Music
Atmosphere
8 p.m.
MIXER
LIVE-BAND:
THE LEAVES
OF GRASS
$1.00: NON-MEMBERS
FREE: MEMBERS
Te Cellar

By AL SHACKELFORD
Take one All-State guard from
column A and another from col-
umn B. Order one 6-8 high school
All-American from column C and
. .. what, you say the 6-8 boy
can't get into Michigan?
And that 6-5 guard, "the best
schoolboy player on the eastern
seaboard," and you say he can't
get in either?
So the 6-8 center ends up at
Northern Illinois, the 6-5 guard is
grabbed off by New Mexico, and
Michigan has a competent but
relatively uninspiring year in bas-
ketball recruiting.
Michigan's recruiting strategy
for the summer was to get the
guards to go with the big play-
ers recruited last year: Henry
Wilmore, Ken Brady, Ernie John-
son, John Lockard and others. As
Johnny Orr says, "Our big play-
ers are good enough; we needed
guards."
AND THE, RECRUITERS got
the guards, namely 6-2 T e r r y
Tyler of Dayton, Ohio; 6-3 Jim
Taormina of Pennsauken, N.J.;
q-2 John Bridge of Opalocka, Fla.;
and 5-11 Mike Weaver from De-
troit Northwesterin. These four
guards are the only players re-
cruited who are on scholarship.
Michigan's basketball hierar-
chy also got an unexpected but
welcome surprise when Sam
Brady, a flashy 6-4 star from Pon-
tiac Catholic, entered Michigan.
If Brady can find his way through
the maze of academia, he will pep

up the roumdball program here
like an amphetamine.
"The big one that got away"
from recruiters this year is that
mysterious 6-5 guard previously
mentioned, supersmooth , John
Williamson of New Haven, Conn.
Williamson had the recruiters sal-
ivating and nuzzling their game
films in heated anticipation, but,
unfortunately, he could not' live
up to Michigan's high academic
standards.
THE OTHER mystery man is
6-8 Jim Brady from East Chi-
cago, Indiana, who also couldn't
cut the mustard academically.
Almost any year, however, might
look a trifle gray after last year's
super-crop of recruits which in-
cluded last year's leading fresh-
man scorer, Wilmore, and the
others.
SO A RUNDOWN of this year's
plums:
-Tyler was an All-Stater who
led his team to the Ohio "state
championship while averaging 17.2
points a game. He can be charact-
erized as a team leader, real
gung-ho type.
-Taormina teamed- up w i t h
Dave Strack, Jr. (and ain't it a
small world) to lead his Staunton
Military Academy squad to many
victories and a sublime state of
euphoria. He scored at a clip of
20 points a contest while also pick-
ing off a healthy 13 caroms a
game.
-Bridges, like Tyler, led his
Steak and Eggs
f $.2O

team to the state championship
in Florida while firing in 24 points
a game.
--Weaver teamed with back-
court partner Mike Robinson last
year to give Northwestern t h e
superb guardtcombination which
enabled them to hand Detroit Ket-
tering its only loss in Detroit City
League play.
Other notable players in iMch-
igan's freshman fold include Dave
Clancy from oPntiac Northern,
Dave Witten from East Lansing,
and Doug McKenzie of Warren.
Fitzgerald, who led a double life
as a schoolboy basketball and
football star.
THIS YEAR'S recruits may
eventually become known as those
grabbed in the "year between:"
Wilmore et al recruited last year
and next year Michigan will go
after such mind-blowing prospects
as Lindsay Hairston of Detroit
Kettering; Charles Cleveland
from Tuscaloosa, Alabama; Henry
Williams of Norristown, Pennsyl-
vania; and finally,sand most signi-
ficantly, Campy Russell of Pon-
tiac Central. Russel has, at dif-
ferent stages of his career, been
compared to Lew Alcindor, Calvin
Murphy and Baby Huey.
So, fans, Michigan got' its
guards and the basketball revival
is moving along right on sched-
ule. Notre Dame and Austin Carr
move into the Events Buildings
December 1 to open the season;
who knows, maybe we'll all get to
hear the band play "Friendship
Train", again and listen to t h e
sound of Gladys Knight and the
Pips turning over in their figura-
tive grave.
TV RENTALS
$10.50 permonth
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
.1 1 662-5671

Gonzales
defeated in'
pen Tennis
FOREST HILLS, N.Y. (P) -
Nicola Pilic, a tennis gypsy from
Yugoslavia with a temper almost
as quick as his racket, cut down
Pancho Gonzales 4-6, 6-2, 7-6, 7-5
in the third round of t h e U.S.
.Open Championships yesterday,
and then apologized.
"I am so sorry, Pancho always
is my idol," said the tall good-
looking circuit rider from behind
the Iron Curtain. "I win because
I am 10 years younger. Pancho
is not as strong and as fast as
he once was."
Three of America's principal
threats - Arthur Ashe, Jr., Stan
Smith and Clark Graebner - en-
tered the fourth round along with
Pilic, Tom Okker of Holland and
Roy Emerson of Australia. A
fourth, Cliff Richey, p l a y s his
third around match today as does
favored Rod Laver of Australia.
Graebner, New York paper ex-
ecutive, won a three-hour slam
bang battle from Bill Bowrey of
Australia 6-3, 4-6, 6-7, 6-2, 6-4.
His clinching break came in the
hotly contested ninth game of the
fifth set.
h u l d a t t e d a n g e
held this Tuesday, September 8,
at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will
be in the basement of the Ath-
letic Administration Buildingon
the corner of Hoover and State
Streets.
IM sports begin this Tuesday
with a manager's meeting at 8
p.m. for fraternities and 9:30
p.m. for independents. On Wed-
nesday graduate student man-
agers meet at 7:30 p.m. a n d
Residence H all1s at 8:00 p.m.
Meetings will be in the wrest-
ling room of the IM $ldg.
Sign up lists are posted at the
IM Bldg. for frat tennis (be-
gins Sept. 10), frat golf (be-
gins Sept. 12), and independents,
and residence hall golf (begins
Sept. 13).
Ii. ~i1

on this and that
The ballad of
a worried' man
eric siegel.
YOU WON THE CONFERENCE championship last year and
are ranked among the top five or six teams in the country in
every major pre-season poll in the country. You have 33 letter-
men, including your quarterback and your top two running
backs, returning. Your defense, which last year gave up an aver-
age of only t points to seven conference opponents, figures to
be even better this year.b
How, in other words, could you possibly worry?
You could worry. Michigan Coach Bo Schembechler,
whose team fits the above description, is worried. Not just
a little worried, a lot worried.
What Schembechler is worrying about is injuries to a num-
ber of key players, a squad that, number-wise, is quite prob-
ably the smallest of any major college team i the nation, and
a lack of practice time.
Ask him about the progess of the offense, for example, and
he'll answer you with one word: "disappointing." Ask him if
some of the recent injuries to key players are an expected part
of the game in the first week of contact drills, and he'll answer
you with a' glum look and a shake of his head. "No, we didn't
expect those injuries at all," he'll say.
All of his worries are interrelated, but if you had to
single out one major problem, it would be the knee of half-
back Glenn Doughty.
At the beginning of the year, it was announced that Dough-
ty, who injured his knee last year before the Rose Bowl, was
"fit and ready to go." Pchembecher, was never quite that op-
timistic. "With an injury like that," he said, "you never know
how a player can perform until he goes out in a game situa-
tion and gets hit.
"And," he added, "a running back who can't take a blow
isn't much of a running back. There's no way you can keep him
from getting hit."
And so now Doughty is out with a strain of his injured
knee.: And while the new injury is not serious, medically-
speaking, it is serious enough to worry his coach.
"The offense is not good right now," according to Bo, "and
Doughty's injury has set us back real bad. If he's out much
longer, he'll have an awful time coming back. He missed spring
practice so lie was behind when he started this fall."
When asked yesterday if Doughty will be ready to practice
Monday, Schembechler answered, "He'd better be, if he's going
to be ready to play, when the season starts."
The injury to Doughty, who has missed the last three
practices, hurts the Wolverines where they can least af-
ford it - in the offensive backfield. The team had already
been shorthanded there after sophomore running b a c k
Cowboy Walker was lost to the team for the season earlier
in theyear.
It seems as if three out Qf every four players who limp off
the field are from the offensive backfield. Lance Scheffler, Bil-
ly Taylor, Greg Harrison, Fritz Seyfreth, and Randy Logan have
all missed some practice Schembechler is quite succinct in sum-
ming up the strategic effect of these injuries. "We haven't been
able to have an offensive team together to practice," he says,
"and it's hurt us."
Schembechler, who likes a. hard running game, points
out that "You need threeplayers at each of your running
back positions." He points to last year's Rose Bowl game,
when the Wolverines were forced to use third-stringer
Lance Scheffler because of the pre-game injury to Doughty
and Billy Taylor's injury during the game.
Besides Doughty, defensive halfback Tom Darden, secon-
string defensive tackle Tom Beckman and split end Billy Har-
ris are all recuperating from injuries. That means that the
team, which now has only 66 players on its roster, is down to
around 60 for the situation-scrimmages that are so vital to a
team's timing.,
With such a small squad, and with the freshmen not yet
in condition to practice with the varsity, Schembechler has not
been able to get in as much real practice time as he would like.
The team has been so short-handed that Jim Betts,.the safety,
had to work out at wolfback for a couple of plays the other day
so the offense would have a full team to practice against.
On top of it all, the team has had to curtail its two-a.
day practices with the start of classes, and this has She-
bechler worried, too. "We could use a lot more practice
time," he says. "We need the work."
Schembechler, of course, is noted for his pessimism.1 He
would, one suspects, find something to worry about even if there
were no injuries, no small squad and no lack of practice time.
And while Schembechler's worries are certainly no fan-
tasies, it perhaps should be noted for the record that.as late as
the Monday before last year's opener against Vanderbilt, 10
players, including All-American Jim Mandich, were on the in-
jured list.
The rest is history.

4

V

* Home of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation at UM
1429 HILL ST.

Kunslier's
Cunning!

AT
CAMPUS GRILL
RESTAURANT
808 S. State St.

Shoemaker ties ,mark

*

I

r

- I

for turf victories

95% of the Reading Population Reads Only 250 to
300 Words Per Minute or Less

I

-ADVERTISEMENT-
Reprint from The

Michigan Daily, March 16, 1968

ST RIEA

The eternal truths

I

IG

of Pizza Bob

'Is Not Difficult, to Learn
Those who completed courses held this past year at the Bell Tower
Hotel achieved speeds of 800 to 2000 w.p.m. with the same or
increased comprehension they had at their slower reading rates.
SEE HOW EASILY YOU (AN:
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increase your enjoyment of+
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atacost less than HALF that of other commercial
reading courses offered in this area!

By TOBE LEV
OFTEN SOME PEOPLE go unnoticed just because their;lives
are more humdrum and more usual than ours.,
Piza Bob, manager of Loy's Pizzeria at State and Packard,
has never been in the public's eye. You might very well ask how
a human being weighing nearly 300 pounds and standing only
63 inches high could avoid it.
But there are no ballads about Pizza Bob, even though he
rolls along as well as the Mississippi River ever did.
Bob has a huge, immobile face which in democratic fashion
greets little old ladies and hippie radicals and high school
greases and two-headed-six-eyed-Hiroshima mutates with the
self,-same "What'll it be?"
No one, no matter how bizarre, will ever make Pizza Bob
blow his cool. Like the proverbial tortoise, he works at the exact
speed, whether two or twenty are jammed into hid little shop,
HE IS AN inspiration to all of us hung-up, neurotic stu-
dents.
"Bob, our hockey team just lost 10-0." "That's okay it could
have been 11."
"Bob, I've been putting in a lot of time at The Daily lately."
"I knew someone who worked at The Daily. He had a heart
attack and died." "Are you kidding me?" "Hell no."
"V7an .r-a n annrrt. nc ena-"7 # ht , T - - n n

Kunstier' s
Conspiring!

DEL MAR, Calif. (P)-Blanked
on his first four mounts, jockey
Bill Shoemaker came through in
the ninth and final race at Del
Mar yesterday to tie Johnny Long-
den's life-time record of 6,032
winners. ,
Cheered on, by 18,992 fans, the
largest Del' Mar crowd in four
years, the determined Shoemaker
broke on top with Esquimal, the
favorite, and made it a wire-to-
wire victory in the 1 1/16 mile run
on the turf course.
Shoemaker will resume his ef-
forts to break the record set by
the retired Longden on Monday's
Labor Day card withseven
mounts.

It had been a frustrating week
for the 39-year-old Shoemaker
and his supporters. On this sunny
afternoon prior to the ninth race
he had gone down to defeat on
three other favorites.
Esquimal declined to comment
on the heroic victory.'
Esquimal, a five-year-old geld-
ing, is owned by Dr. Frank Di
Flore and is trained by Farrell
Jones.
This is the first all-time record-
tying race he has run.
Shoemaker-tied the record with
his 24,532nd mount in a career
that began 21 years ago. His first
victory was on Shafter V on April
20, 1949; at Golden Gate Fields.

I.-

I

IS A KINSEY REPORT ON RELIGION
POSSIBLE?
"MOTHER, THE BLUE TITS ARE INTO THE MILK BOTTLES AGAIN."
IS A KINSEY REPORT POSSIBLE?
"HUSH FIONA, YOUR SISTER IS LISTENING."
IS A KINSEY POSSIBLE?
"BUT MOTHER-R-R!"
IS? If your answer to these and other

'I

1i

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