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December 09, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PRESENTED BY
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
DECEMBER 17-20
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box office opens Monday, December 14
PHONE 668-6300 10:00 A.M.
* Thursday and Sunday performances at 8:00 P.M.
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE, P.O. Box 1993
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 662-9405
FISH FOWL & OTH ER CREATUR ES
DINE IN or CARRY CUT
dish & chips uncheon .89
ONE PECE OFF + CHIPS
psh& chips binne u.lao
TWO PtECESOF FISH+CIPs
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TEN PIECES OFFISH, SE VES S-7
chicken Li ncheon .79
'TWO PIECES Of C41clEtscIPS
ch ckenbsneiz .3
THEE PIECES. .AW. ROLL
squflwe'sspv2.39
NINE PIECES OCHICKEN. SERVES 3-4
bukes b&11Cht 3699
FFTEEN PIECESOFCHICKEN.SERVESS-7I
TW Y-ONE PIECES OFCIICKEN. SERVES 7-93
hW coJleb efs nbwlch .7
hot ham &fcheese sanbwich .
U~emuba 0111011 W11 HAND- DIFP 45
2 LOCATIONS
0 SERVING ANN ARBOR " SERVING YPSILANTI
1315 S. University (1 blk west of K-mart)
769-8240 4910 Washtenow
434-1545
Sun.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.-1 a.m. Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
rrrr=m nmmmmmmm. tear out coupon & bring in +--rn.. r.......
50c OFF on
FISH AND CHIPS DINNER
offer good at both stores-expires Dec. 19, 1970

page three

LIT 4

SIirtgtan

43 a t1y

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, December 9, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page. Three

news briefs
By The Associated Press
THE "POLITICAL TRIAL" of 16 Basque nationalists con-
tinued yesterday as defense testimony drew toward a close.
The 16 are charged with banditry, rebellion and terrorism. The
prosecution is asking for a total of 752 years in prison for them.
The presiding judge of the seven-man military panel hearing the
case cracked down on the defense, cutting off what threatened to be
a wave of antigovernment testimony.
Last night a Roman Catholic priest stunned the court by pro-
claiming his membership in ETA, the secret Basque guerrilla group{
which is held responsible for the recent unrest.
The trial has set off protest demonstrations across Spain, giving
the regime of Gen. Francisco Franco its deepest crisis since he took
power in the Spanish civil war in 1939.
* * *
KREMLIN PLANNERS yesterday unveiled the 1971 Soviet
budget.
The proposed defense outlay was the same as this year's-11 per
cent of the total budget, and production goals seemed modest.
But, since the Soviet defense figure does not include military
research and development, defense expenditures seem lower than
they are. Western analysts estimate that the figure given represents
half the real military spending.
Soviet industrial production bounced back from a bad year ins
1969 to register an eight per cent increase in 1970, according to
Nikolai Baibakov. chairman of the Economic Planning Commission.
THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION (AEC) yesterday set
forth ecological guidelines for granting nuclear power plant
licenses.
Issues which could be raised, an AEC spokesman indicated, might
include possible heat pollution of waters around the plant, excessive
noise from construction or other activity, interference with the en-
joyment of a recreational area, or adverse effects on the natural
beauty of the environment.
THE UNITED NATIONS Security Council yesterday approved1
a resolution condemning Portugal for its recent invasion of
Guinea.
Portugal has denied playing any part in the invasion,, rejecting
the Security Council report that it attacked the independent West
African nation from neighboring Portuguese Guinea with the aid of
Guinean rebels.
- U

Rail
on

unions

rebuff

Nixon
request

15-day

.
extensionr

Leaders vow to begin strike
as Thursday deadline nears
WASHINGTON (R--Railroad workers yesterday reiterated
their pledge to begin striking at 12":01 tomorrow morning
despite frantic congressional efforts to pass stopgap legis-
lation.
President Nixon had requested a legislated 45 day strike
enbargo.
"These are promises, not threats. There is going to be a
national rail strike," said President C. L. Dennis of the
Brotherhood of Railway Clerks, largest of the four unions
which represent the 500,000 workers in the wage dispute.
Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.) join-
ed Jacob Javits (R.-N.Y.) to urge Nixon to summon manage-
ment and union iiiediators in hopes of attaining a negotiated
settlement.

-Associated Press
PRESIDENT C. L. DENNIS of the Brotherhood of Railway Clerks
emphasizes at a press conference yesterday that congressional
stopgap action will not avert the rail strike set to begin this
morning.
DEMANDS NIXON'S PLANS:
Senate bars funds for
troops in Cambodia.
WASHINGTON (M' - The Senate voted yesterday to, bar defense

At the White House there seem-
ed to be no immediate interest in
the senators' suggestion. Press
secretary Ronald Ziegler said that
if Congress passed the 45-day ex-
tension and the unions defied it,
the matter would be in the hands
of the courts.
Dennis is reinforced in his strike
position by AFL-CIO President
George Meany, who 'called on le-
gislators to reject the President's
request.
Three times in the past seven
years Congress has halted nation-
wide strikes or strike threats with
such special legislation after ex-
"hausting remedies of the Rail-
way Labor Act. This is the first
time a union has said it would vio-
late .such a special law.
In Detroit, spokesmen for the
three major automobile makers
said their assembly lines would
have to shut down within a week
if a strike halts shipment to the
assembly plants.
In a related development, Ma-
jority Leader Mansfield joined 29
other Senators in assailing t h e
,Interstate Commerce Commission
(ICC) for what they termed its
c o n s i s t e n t ly pro-management
stance in the railroad dispute.
The senators charged that ICC
had ceased to be a regulatory
agency and has acceded to virt-
ually all railroad demands includ-
ing a 30 per cent freight-rate in-
crease in just over three years.

KONG STRIKES TWICE
TWO KING KONGS
FIGHT TO THE DEATH!

funds for U.S. combat ground troops in Cambodia amid demands in
an appropriations subcommittee that the Nixon administration dis-
close its long-range plans in Southeast Asia.
The new bar on sending troops to Cambodia, similar to one en-
acted a year ago covering Laos and Thailand, was contained in the
$66.4-billion defense money bill, passed on a roll-call vote of 89 to 0.
It goes to conference with the House where the ban on troops
for Cambodia could run into stiff opposition.
The Foreign Relations Committee, meanwhile, received a secret
staff report from two aides who have just returned from Cambodia
and announced a censored ver-
sion will be released Wednesday. dA"M"QQ £ L4, T

:I

Blackou t in
Britain may
hit factories
LONDON (R) - A power black-
out hit Queen Elizabeth II's Buck-
ingham Palace yesterday and elec-
tricity workers on a slowdown
strike threatened to close Britain's
factories. The electricity switched
off in half the country.
The power cuts cast' a.rstrange
checkerboard pattern of light and
dark over strike-ridden Britain.
In some places the blackouts re-
sembled the air raid, emergencies=
of World War II. In others the
li g h t s dazzled normally and
Christmas decorations glowed.
By nightfall, the power slow-
down strike for a 25 per cent wage
increase had hit one family in ev-
ery three in half of Britain, the
Electricity C o u n c '1 announced.
Factories slowed production and
a council spokesman said that to-
day it might have to cut off elec-
tricity to some of the plants that
produce the nation's crucial ex-
ports,
Prime Minister Edward Heath's
government met to consider the
power crisis. John Davies, secre-
tary for trade= and industry, set up
a special around-the-clock opera-
tion room to advise industry and
the public, and he urged the dis-
puting unions to turn on the elec-
tric switches and negotiate.
The power slowdown struck as
thousands of Communist-led pro-
test strikers shut down factories
and major ports in separate wild-
cat walkouts to oppose the Con-
servative government's antistrike
plans.
One-day walkouts called by left-
ist opponents of the Conservative
government's antistrike legisla-
tion paralyzed, large sections of
the shipbuilding, newspaper and
automobile industries.

" rUTE nr. TrWW d'r r.Wdrl .

The subcommittee hearing which
brought demands for disclosure of
long-range U.S. plans in South-
east Asia also produced adminis-
tration pledges against deeper
U.S. involvement in Cambodia,
plus forecasts that U.S. aid for
Southeast Asia will be needed for
a considerable time.
Secretary of State William Rog-
ers said U.S. economic aid to
South Vietnam and Cambodia will
continue even after the Vietnam
war ends but "we have no inten-
tion of slipping into the mistakes
of the past" by becoming more
heavily involved in Cambodia.

House revives SST status

WASHINGTON (P) - The
House yesterday kept the con-
troversial U.S. supersonic trans-
port (SST) program tenuously
alive by refusing to concur with
Senate rejection of its $290 mil-
lion funding for this year.
It voted 213-174 against in-
structing its conferees to accept
the Senate action.
Because the House-passed ver-
sion of the bill includes the ap-
propriation, the matter must be
resolved in conference.

Double Feature
ALL SEATS 75c
Saturday & Sunday
Matinees Only

The size of the favorable vote
cheered SST proponents who
have been saying that a 20-vote
margin would strengthen their
argument with the Senate con-
ferees, whose chamber voted 52
to 41 to delete the money from
the $2.5-billion bill.
Senate conferees still will be
under strong moral, possibly ir-
revocable commitment to in-
sist on the deletion.

o IRTH Porum
P~i IT AVENUE AT USERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 769-8700

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