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December 09, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-09

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Off the shelf:
Replacing Norton reader

By LAURIE HARRIS
It's just corrugated cardboard!
At least the cover is card-
board, but the inside is as inno-
vative as its external appear-
ance. The book is Student
Voices/One compiled by English
professors Christopher Reaske
and Robert Willson and looks as
though it may outdate such in-
famous readers as the Norton
Anthology.
Instead of selecting already
established; writers whose styles
are well known and imitated,
Willson and Reaske have can-
vass'ed the country's college
newspapers lifting all types of
articles by students. Broken
down into three sections, Po-
litical Action, Culture, and The
University, the book aims at
present student concerns. 'Rea-
ske says. "The Norton Readers
shows where composition was a
few years ago; ours is where it
is now."
"In teaching composition,"
Willson believes, "we shouldn't
use Norman Mailer and I. F.
Stone as models." Students tend
to pattern their own writing
styles after these already estab-
lished authors. Instead the'edi-
tors have decided to have stu-
dents evaluate t ,h e i r contem-
porary's writing. None of the
students have a reputation
worth copying, but each is very
instructive in 'showing patterns
of writing.
Most of, the works were
chosen for their literary excel-
lence, but several interspersed
throughout the book are not
that good. These are meant to
draw comparisons to the other
works. But what is good or bad,
according to Reaske's and Will
son's criteria is not indicated.
Each of the passages, which
vary '.from excerpted books,
.newspaper articles, or campus
handouts, are followed by a
series of questions. According to
Reaske, these questions are tra-
ditional and yet the book itself
Is unique.
Many professors in the Eng-
lish department have already
*expressed satisfaction. with the
book and several major publish-,
ing companies are picking up on
the idea and printing variations
of the book.

Student Voices draws from all
over the country, with a pre-
ponderance from the Daily and
the Columbia Spectator where
they found the writing to be the
best of the other college papers
in the country. One of the com-
missioned books, patterned after
Student Voices/One will be
drawn from only one university.
But the important factor, ac-
cording to the editors, is that
the articles catch the mood of
a specific year, turning each
year into a capsule and Student
Voices into an ongoing progres-
sion. The book is a singular at-
tempt in the expansion of rele-
vant readers publishing what
students have to say about the
contemporary issues.

To catch up on what stu-
dents believe politically right
and left, from all areas of the
country, this book can be sim-
ply interesting. But on a larger
scale its implications show the
growing concern for the inclu-
sion of students in the writing
and development of their own
textbooks.
If the book is to be re-pro-
duced every few years, then
Reaske and Willson believe that
there must be expansions in all
the facets of the book. They
must reach into a larger audi-
ence perhaps including articles
from junior colleges. And they
must delve into the widening
fields of literary and especially
film criticism.

Designers: Set it together

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre is
sponsoring a set designing con-
test for the last show of the
season, The Brass and Grass
Forever, an original musical-
comedy written, composed and
directed by Jerry Bilik, to be
produced May 5-9.
Competition is open to any-
one, but if a non-member's de-
sign is selected, he will be ex-
pected to join AACT. The dead-
line for designs is Feb. 1, and
must include accurately scaled
floor plans, elevations and either
color renderings or a fully de-
tailed model. They must be
finished and capable of being
implemented without revision or
addition.
Designs will be judged for
their imaginativeness, appro-

priateness and practicality, and
each must be economically as
well as physically feasible.
Those interested may pick up
a description of the set require-
ments, the financial limits with-
in which they are expected to
'work and a set of stage blue-
prints at the AACT Building,
201 Mulholland, anytime after
Dec. 10. For further informa-
tion, call Dwight Stevenson at
426-4749 after 5 p.m.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Micnigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
glass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mai'
Summer Session published Tuesday
throrugh Saturday morning. Subsrip-
l)on rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail

Charlie Brown' opens
You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown, New York's long-running
musical based on Charles M. Schulz' comic cartoon "Peanuts"
opened last night at Mendelssohn Theatre and will continue through
Dec. 13.
The musical brings to life characters who have become among
the most beloved figures in American pop mythology: Snoopy, the
brilliant beagle and WW I flying ace; Lucy Van Pelt, that paragon
of crabbiness; Linus, the blanket-brandishing moppet; and Sch-
roeder, the would-be Beethoven. But the character that readers
and audiences seem to identify with most is the shy, winsome,
inferiority complex-ridden hero, Charlie Brown.
- -

tI

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Ilk

RADICAL FILM SERIES
Presents
mAlain Robbe-Grillet's
L'IMMORTELLE
admission 75c.

LAST WEEK
ends
Thursday

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Shows at
1,3,5;
7, 9:05

7-9-11 p.m.

TONIGHT
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
(NEXT WEEK: "Witchcraft Through the Ages")

I.~.__ - I

"The funniest movie I've seen this
year! Just go, run to see it!"
New York Post
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Players Series
"Quirk Auditorium
Wed. through Sun.
Dec. 9-13-8:00 p.m.
Saturday at7 and 10 p.m.
ALL SEATS RESERVED $2.00

Box
Office
open
weekdays
12:45-4:30
Reservations
dial
487-1220

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a black theatre masterpiece
Blues For Mister Charlie

Excellent Christmas
and Hanukkah Gifts

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ENDING WEDNESDAY
A fantastic
movie about
man's future!
An unprecedented
psychedelic roller
coaster of an
experiencel!"
-Life Magazine
the ultimate trip

Sunday, December 20, 1970
r..Annn -f.lf nn -

Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 764-0558

1

Wednesday, December 9
NAKED SPUR
dir. ANTHONY MANN (1953)
Digs into your emotional flanks and draws blood.
"Mann directs action movies with a kind of tough
guy authority."-Sarris with James Stewart, Janet
Leigh
SHORT: Sex Life of a Polyp, with Robert Benchley
Thursday-Friday, Dec. 10-11
The Lavender Hill Mob
dir. CHARLES CRICHTON (1951)
Alec Guiness and Stanley Holloway
Would it be stretching the point to suggest that in
the modern Western world this sneaky paper-weight-
ed civil servant is the new image of Everyman.
SHORT: Just Neighbors, with Harold Lloyd
Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 12-13
* I A b - - k A A - . ___- __

Y.
ti;
i

Unl8:UU p.m. AUCt: 8H U p.m.
OLD HEIDELBERG
211 North Main St.
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Free Admission * Door Prizes
'4*
We assist organizations in fund raising,
tor information call
609-466-3011 r

"I

ENDS TODAY-Open 1 p.m.
At State and Liberty Sts. *
Dial 662-6264
Shows at 1:15-3-5-7-9P.M.
TOMORROWN

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WATERMELON,
MAN"
-Salmeggi, WINS
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
GODFREY CAMBRIDGE * ESTELLE PARSONS

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