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December 06, 1970 - Image 17

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-06
Note:
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Page Twelve

THE DAILY MAGAZINE

Sunday, December 6, 1970

Sundav December 6,:1970

THE DAILY MAGAZINE

WEIRD VACATION READING

The actual finding of the Ch/

Books. you CAN

tell by their covers

By ROBERT C. WHITE
Publishers, by the very nature
of their trade, have always been
firm believers in the adage that
"you can't tell a book by it's
cover." One thinks immediately
of the indiscretions taken with
such ladies of literature as the
evermaligned Madame Bovary
(who either may or may not have
asked for it) or even such
staunch moralists as Isabel
Archer and the unfortunate

Hester Prynne. Regardless of
age or station, they invariably
fall mercilessly to the blow of
those dust jacket geniuses of
publisher's row.
And so it is that just about
Christmastime (which dawns un-
usually early in the publishing
kingdoms) we begin to see the
fruits of these latent artists in
their full bloom. Yet, this is not
to deny that there is not a con-
siderable talent available and

one which, at times. can illus-
trate an uncanny skill in joining
form and function.
One of the more interesting
steps in this direction has been
taken by the people at Double-
day in issuing the first two of
their Photography Portfolios.
The trick in this case has been
to remove the traditional cover
altogether and replace it with a
plain white box designated in
in one instance as Eight Photo-
h Jr.., U 4, n d i

a cost of less than a dollar a
print.
A book of another cover is
that designed by "Hess and/or
Antupit" for Ken Heyman and
Edmund ,Carpenter's They Be-
came What They Beheld. The
cover in this instance is done in
bright silver metallic which re-
flects the viewer's face and, in
so doing, immediately involves
the reader in an experience
which is surely as visual as it is
i ntlln ct l C i r t ntr nd He-

grap s: ,terry ueismann aiajiin 111LJtJUA mL mee e 1. ap 1 a11Ur sey-
Leslie Krims. Granted, portfolios, photographer, join their re-
have never been particularly un- spective disciplines in such
*";c o m m o n in the publishing splendid fashion that the two
world, but this is the first time seem absolutely inseparable.
that top quality photographic The medium, in this instance,
3 reproductions have been pub- quite obviously adheres to Mc-
_rlished on a mass market scale at Luhan's message. By juxtaposing
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images of contemporary Amer-
ica with those of other cultures,
the book credibly argues that we
have returned to an essentially
tribal form of life. Carpenter's
coda may be gleaned from the
following remarks: -
"In the 1960's, people spoke
of "dropping out." No more.
Dropping out, like suicide, in-
volved a choice. Now there's no
choice: the system itself has
dropped out.
Electronic media created a
new environment, rendering ob-
solete the patterns by which
literate man codified reality.
Sudenly, all information-freed
from classifications which had
long bound it-became raw data,
available to everyone simultane-
ously via electronic media.'
Out of this vastly confusing
wealth, each of us is forced to
to create his own environment
-that is, program his own
psychic and sensory life. To this
end we turn to the arts, for
omly artists, and maybe crim-
nals, create their own lives.
Perhaps the ultimate achieve-
ment in joining cover and con-
tent has been attained by the
publishers of a little volume en-

(Continued from Page 8)
corns because it is snowing. And
that is because there is snow.
So where there is no snow we
can find haycorns.- And where
there is no snow is beneath pine
trees!"
"Correct," said Rabbit, w h o
was catching on that he and Owl
had better forestall their inquir-
ies into snowing and Christmas-
ing, "Now if everyone will just
start looking for pine trees, our
problems are solved." -
"Well, not really Rabbit -,"
said Piglet, who had happened
to think that there were no
haycorns under pine trees, only
under haycorn trees, which you
could tell because there were
haycorns under them.
"Not really! How dare you
criticize my- er our plans," said
Rabbit. "We know what you
need, and how to get it too. We
are the ones with the brains
around here. If you don't want
our help don't ask for it. Fol-
low us. On to the Six Pine Trees
to Save Piglet!"
So after a short wait until the
time was right, off went the ex-
peditionary force. Owl and Rab-
bit, off they went. Pooh and
Piglet and Tigger (not to men-
tion Eeyore) weren't sure whe-
ther or not to go, but Robin
motioned for them to stay.
So Owl and Rabbit, then Rab-
bit and Owl and finally Owl and
Rabbit (although every once in
in a while Owl deigned to fly
as a demonstration of his mobil-
ity) marched off and were al-
most out of sight before they
looked back and realized that
no one had followed. Dauntless-
ly, they kept on going.
"Well, that's one problem sol-
ved,' said Christopher Robin,

"Let them fool around with pine
trees, we've got something more
important to do."
"Right, said Tigger, "We've
got to find Piglet some things
to eat."
Finally Pooh stood himself up
at his highest, cleared his throat
in that peculiar way that all
residents of the forest were
aware came especially from a
small bear ready to say some-
thing, and said, "Piglet, Well,
here goes. Piglet who needs hay-
corns? Why don't you share my
honey with me this winter? That-
should last us."
Piglet jumped up and down,
ran in one big circle, hugged
Pooh's fur and sighed, "Oh,
Pooh, thank you. Thank you
ever so much. And oh, and next
spring you can have some of my
haycorns, okay?"
"Well, I don't know, Piglet,
because if next spring turns out
the way I hope it does, I won't
have room for anything but
honey," Pooh said, still feeling
his stomach with his paw. "Oh,
that reminds me, Robin, I have
a problem too. Robin what do
bees do in the winter? After all,
if you want to have honey you
have to have bees, even if they
do bite, and I do so hope that
the snowing won't hurt them."
Robin smiled, "What do you
think bees do in the winter,
Pooh?"
"Well, was thinking but I
wasn't quite too sure that may-
be if bees hibernate, well then,
do bees hibernate?" Piglet gig-
gled, Tigger suppressed a sneeze,
we don't really know what Ee-
yore did, and as for Christopher
Robin, he just smiled to Pooh
and himself and said, "Oh, Pooh,
I love you. No matter W h a t,

you're the one who's always
right."
"I love you too, Pooh Bear,"
said Piglet. "Me too!" said Tig-
ger.
"We all do," said Alexander
Beetle, who had been hiding in
Robin's coat pocket. Pooh look-
ed contented, not the least bit

an anxious bear. Still, he looked
for the nearest corner and as he
did so, Robin said, "Don't worry
Pooh, Eeyore loves you too."
(And he did. In fact, we even
think ,we saw him. look this
way ! )
Then, without a word, and
with a smile-on his face which

I II

One Rosemount
deserves
another and
another

Lo o'er
r

titled One Million. The 'one mil-
lion' in this instance begins on
the front cover and carries
through to the back cover, and
consists of one million dots. And
it is, as if in accordance with
Carpenter, one very intriguing
way of trying to "program our
own psychic and sensory" lives.
The function of the book is to
serve as "a yardstick, a ruler
divided into a million parts in-
stead of a dozen. The reader
may use it to measure any quan-
tity between one and one mil-
lion: it will provide a visual
equivalent thereof." For ex-
ample, if the reader is interested
in Cuba, he can turn first to
the index which will then in-
dicate he should see page 88
which consists of the dots rang-
ing between 400,000 and 405,000.
There, dot number 403,120 has
been removed to enhance the
reader's perception, he will dis-
cover the number of seats in
Cuba's movie theaters. A ran-
dom sampling of other such in-
teresting facts might include the
following: 46,399 is the number
of times the word "and" ap-
pears in the King James Bible;
807,086 is the number of people
named Miller in the United
States; or perhapstsomewhat
more significant is the number
721,268 signifying the average
number of deaths from heart
disease each year in the United
States, or 42,265 as the number
of American soldiers killed in
Vietnam as of May 29, 1970.
These, then, are 'some ex-
amples :of books which this sea-
son one can tell by their re-
.spective covers or lack thereof.
In each case they make no pre
tense at being either more or
less than they are, which seems
to say something these days
when Christmas starts at
Thanksgiving and every two-bit
sequin is invariably billed as a
diamond.

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