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November 22, 1970 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-22
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4

Sunday, November 22, 1970

9

.... .-
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4

A

Page Twenty-two

Sunday, November 22, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I El

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a play from the
B LACKTNEATRE

Ron Milner
WHO'S GOT HIS OWN
Directed by Leonard Smith of Wayne State University
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS

Co

I

G

DEC. 2!

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

I

I

a

I

Times outlook:
Movies are to
be toleratedx
Contiued from Page 21
erything. They were all bundled up into
the balcony of this theater. A lot of irrita-
tion.- I was sitting in a row next t Dick
Schickel (of Life Magazine). Next to Dick
was Pauline (Kael). Pauline hated the mo-
vie. She is the most impossible lady to watch
a movie with because she e I t h e r talks
throughout, even when she likes it, or sheA
sits there and sighs, 'Oh my God! He isn't
going to do that! OHHHHHH! Ohhhhhh!
Ohhhhhh! Oh God! Oh Fellini!"'
In the end, the Times film department, f
like all Times departments, doesn't succumb
to pressure from anybody but The New York
Times - the monolithic mold. It doesn't
matter so much who writes what or what
one thinks, because when your copy ends up
in print it's not your copy. It's The New York
Times.
"Any of the critics can write any way he
chooses so long as the style he chooses is
the Times' style," says Greenspun. Copy, like
a Catholic schoolboy, m us t go through a a
thorough process of disinfection from the
evils of the outside world. First it must be. . .
cleared by editor Dick Shepard. Then Shep-
ard turns it over to the copy desk, and from
the copy desk it's handed to the Bullpen,
which the Times man calls "a collection of
old men." It is here that the Times' style isx
imposed. It's here that sex and politics are
removed, a 'Mr.' or 'Miss' inserted before "
each sirname, an arm is changed to a'limb.' ;<.
And it is here that the Times keeps rolling
along its ponderous way.
"There are many words you can't use,"
Greenspun says. "When I was hired I was
told you couldn't say 'fuck,' and I thought
that was OK. I rarely use 'fuck' in a movie w".
review. Now I've discovered you can't use
shit,' you can't use 'screw,' any number of
words. The last word I found taken out of
my copy was 'lousy.' "
Rave Notices.
§ §
§ 4
§§
§ i§
People who write about men's fashions at magazines §
and newspapers have singled out this Gant shirt (called §
Keats) as big fashion news. One, because of its big, §
§ bold, elegantly-proportioned collar which stays wrinkle-
§ free from dusk to dawn. Two, because of its
§ exuberantly striped cotton broadcloth. This Gant Keats
§ shirt is tailored with singular care. It has a trimI

tapered body.- $11.00
§ I
ANN ARBOR DETROIT
326 S. STATE 41 ADAMS EAST

1 ran the Moroccan border
Swithout cutting my hair!

0 - ---- -- --- - - 6

science fiction
By Gabe Eisenstein and Tom Gottlieb
A futuristic photo fantasy about a par
with wings. The new children aren't gr

c~:w
Xis

\f)
STA-PREST.

HOWARD KOHN writes for the De-
troit Free Press. He has worked as as-
sociate editorial director of The Daily
in 1968-69, editor of the Novi News,
and as sports writer for the Detroit
News.
GABE EISENSTEIN is a freshman who
has written for numerous science fic-
tion (fanzene) magazines.

CLARK NORTON
Daily in 1967-6
from North Afric
he wrote for Tr
NEAL GABLER,
science, writes n
Daily.

r TRIM CUTS
Levi's classic Ivy
model with belt
loops and cuffs-
given a now look
with great colors
and fabrics-all
with Sta-Prest.
Nobody but
Levi's makes
Sta-Prest.
0

the daily magc
Dealing junk in Detroit
is not a healthy living
By Howard Kohn
Or, how a young reporter posed as a d
and infiltrated a west side heroin ring
They Review Films, Don't They?
By Neal Gabler
The big New York movie critics live a
filled with intrigue and disappointmer
hoping someone somewhere is listenir

By Clark Norton
Some freaks would rather forego Mc
than cut their hair at the border.

The Daily Magazine, Vol. I, No. 2, November 22, 1970.
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Daniel Zwerdling, editor
Anita Wetterstroem, editorial assistan
Cover photo by Jim Wallace. Photos on p. 4, 5 courtesy
Free Press; on 7, 8, 21 by Jim Judkis; on 18 by Tom Go
Jim Wallace. Sketches on 9, 10, 11 by Suzy Oxford.
~ss"(
Presented By The
in Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor
FRIDAY, DEC. 4 at 8:30
SATURDAY, DEC. 5 at 8:3t
SUNDAY, DEC. 6 at 2:30
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
MEMBERS OF THE INTERLOCHEN ARTS ACADEMY
LUCIA EVANGELISTA, Soprano JOHN McCOL
ELAINE BONAZZI, Contralto JEROME HINE
MARY McCALL STUBB INS, Organist
CHARLES FISHER, Harpsichordist
DONALD BRYANT, Conductor
TICKETS: $3.00 - 2.50 - 1.50
University Musical Society Benefit C
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Pianist-FRI., JAN. 22
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER,
Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 to 4:30; Sat. 9 to 12 (Teleph

'lCEr4S

MEN

bhrl J

1 109 S. UNIVERSITY

49

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