100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday; November 20,'1970-

#i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, November 20, 1970

SALARY, PERSONNEL REDUCTIONS

Lack.

of funds force

By The Associated Press
Detroit, Philadelphia, Baltimore;, New
York and other financially strapped cit-
ies around the nation are turning anew to.
an old economy device - cutting the
payroll.
They are among a dozen cities which
recently have announced layoffs of mu-
nicipal employes, put a freeze on new
hiring in order to shrink the payroll by
attrition or are contemplating such ac-
tions.
New York's Mayor John V. Lindsay,
for example, announced Tuesday, that
500 executive and clerical employes not
covered by civil service would be dropped.
New York has a projected budget deficit
of $300 million and the cutbacks, along
with tighter reins on merit raises, auto,
purchases and low priority services, are
expected to save the city $8.4 million.
Detroit Mayor Roman Gribbs also an-
nounced Tuesday that 110 Department
of Public Works employes will be fired
this Monday, four days before Thanks-
giving.
The new layoffs - saving the city
100 million - bring to. 600 the number
of city workers dropped since Gribbs took

municipal
office in January and will save the city
$1 million.
The workers, Gribbs said, were mainly
in jobs including alley repair, rat control
and street cleaning, financed mainly with
temporary federal funds which have not
been renewed.
An immediate hiring freeze imposed
yesterday in Baltimore hopefully will
build up a surplus in the budget there.
No firings are planned but the city's fi-
nancial picture depends on how much the
legislature appropriates for the city next,
year.
Philadelphia has had a hiring freeze
sinceJune inn response to a fiscal crisis.
Since then 517 jobs have been left unfill-
ed, bringing total vacancies to 1,135.
The 1,135 vacancies, five per cent of
the city's noriuniformed work force, will
save the city $11 million, Finance Direct-
or Romanus J. Buckley said.
The fiscal problems-resulted from sum-
mer emergencies which cost police over-
time, costly wage settlements with city
workers and rennovation of a peniten-
tiary. Mayor James H. J. Tate has said
the freeze will continue indefinitely.
Portland, Ore., also was forced into a
payroll cut by attrition because of a po-

cutbacks
'lice pay increase. Tulsa, Okla., has had
a freeze on noncritical hirings for sev-
eral months, and Omaha's mayor, Eugene
Leathy, kicked off his austerity program
in September by firing an assistant and
a secretary in his own office.
In the year since Peter Flaherty won
the mayor's office in Pittsburgt on a cam-
paign of economy and austerity, 300 city
employes have been fired. Now he says
more firings are likely to balance the
1971 budget. And Pittsburgh, like most
of the cities, is not spending any money
on retraining the laid off workers.
Nashville, Tenn., facing a police pay
dispute, and East St. Louis, Ill., running
at a deficit for 20 years, indicate they
may be forced to lay off workers soon.
Seattle has no plans for layoffs,; but
the city council is studying a budget that
calls for a two per cent municipal pay
boost.
If the Seattle municipal employe un-
ions demand six or seven per cent, there
will be "substantial layoffs" Council Fi-
nance Chairman Ted Best said.
On the other hand, Richard J. Daley,
mayor of Chicago, submitted a budget
message this week that announced he is
adding 500 policemen to the force.

COME TO
TOWN and COUNTRY
RESTAURANT
Fine Food
Chops, Steaks, & Shrimp
Soul Food Home Cooked
Open Pit Barbeque
-Open-
6 a.m. till 9 p.m.-Mon.-Thurs.
6 a.m. till 3 a.m.-i-Fri.-Sat.
8 a.m. till 7:30 p.m-Sunday
730 NORTH MAIN
Delivery and Catering
769-2330

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
Tads
Sebring
State Street at Liberty

4

Lindsay: Cutbacks

Prexy's Complaint
Do you know why you haven't seen the president of your college
lately? Here's why: he quit.
You don't believe me, I see. You sneer and make coarse gestures.
But it's true all the same. Not one college president in the entire
United States came back to work this fall. They chickened out, every
last one.
A few will return: they're just taking a year off to study karate.
But most aren't coming back ever. And can you blame them? What
kind of work is this for a dignified, elderly person-cowering under his
desk all day long, wearing bullet-proof underwear, hiring food tasters,
getting into fistfights with sophomore girls?
It's hard to realize that only three or four years ago a college
president was a figure of respect and regard-yea, reverence even! I'll
admit of course that undergraduates were much more tractable in
those days because, as you will no doubt recall, sex and drugs had not
yet been introduced from Europe.
But even so, they were lively rascals, yesterday's undergrads
scampering all over campus on their little fat legs, cheering and halloo-
ing, identifying lichens, conjugating verbs. But no matter how en-
grossed they were in their games and sports, whenever Prexy hap-
pened by, they would instantly run over to kiss his vest and sing 24
choruses of the Alma Mater. Ah, it was a lovely and gracious time,
now gone, alas, forever!
Incidentally, you'll notice that I used the word "Prexy." That of
course is what college presidents are always called, as I'm sure you
knew. But did you know that trustees are always called "Trixie?"
Similarly, deans are always called "Doxy" except of course in the
South where they are always called "Dixie." Associate professors of
course are called "Axy-Pixie." Hockey coaches of course are called
"Hootchy-Cootchy." Students are called "Algae."
And Miller High Life is called "The Champagne of Beers." I men-
tion Miller High Life because I am paid to write these columns by the
brewers of Miller High Life. They are, I must say, a very relaxed kind
of employer. They let me write whatever I want to. There's no censor-
ship, no pressure, and no taboos. In fact, I don't even have to mention
Miller High Life unless I feel like it. Naturally, the brewers are a little
disappointed if I don't mention it, but they never complain. They just
smile bravely and stop my check. -

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
offivid n ublication of the Univer- I

Day Calendar
Economics and Research Seminar in
Quantitative Economics, Annual Con-
terence on the Economic Outlook: Rack-
ham Amphitheatre, 9 a.m.
Astronomy Colloquium: Dr. M. Al-'
ler, Promethium in -HR 465: Evidence
fo Nucleon-svnthesis on the Surface of

General Notices
AAUP Chapter meeting Tuesday, Nov.
24, 8 p.m., in E. Conference Rm., Rack-
ham, subject: "'Police on the campus,"'
- speakers: Col. Frederick Davids,
James Brinkerhoff, Robert Knauss,
Kenneth Klinge, John Atkinson, and
Charles Ferguson.

N. University, orders should be placed
immediately, MUST be placed before
Nov. 21. Assembly for Graduates: 1:00
p.m., Nat. Sci. Bldg. Signs will direct
graduates to proper stations. Programs:
distributed at Hill. Announcements: A
limited number of graduation an-
nouncements for sale at Information
Desk, Floor Lobby, LSA. Candidates who
qualify for doctoral degree from the
Graduate School and who attend the
commencement exercises will be pre-
sented a hood by the University as part
of the ceremony.

Join The Daily
Sports Staff

I

!i=

o icia paacrv v ne aca or iuc I Synubsuwi: -c
sity of Michigan. Notices should be of a Star," P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 p.m. ant * .
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to Post graduate Medicine, American Winter Conmnencement: Dec. 12, 2:00
Association for Automotive Medicine p.m. Hill Aud. All graduates of 1970 fall
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before Annual Conference: Towsley Center, term may attend. Reception for grad-
2 p.m, of the day preceding pub- 8:30 aFm. uates, etc., in Michigan League Ball-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for International Folk Dance: Barbourj room immediately following ceremony;
Ibmraypear Gym, 7:30 p.m. please enter League at west entrance.
Satudday and Sunday. Items appear Degree Recital: Eric Rupp, trum- Tickets: Four to each prospective
once only. Student organization pet, Sch. of Music Recital Hall, 8 grad., distributed from Nov. 30 to Dec.
notices are not accepted for publi-j p.m. 11, Diploma Dept., 1518 LSA, except on
cation. For more information, phone Opera: IPuccini's "Madame Btutterfly," Sat. Dec. 5. Any remaining tickets will
764-9270. - Josef Blatt, conductor and Ralph be avail. Sat. morning, Dec. 12, at In-
Herbert, stage director, Lydia Mendels- formation Desk, LSA on first come,
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20 sohn Theatre, 8 p.m. first served basis. Academic Costume:
may b rented at Moe Sport Shop, 711
."IirIxQ hJi4v2 '7: I"v+: . ::.Ave......... . ....,... "

Proaressie Refreshments Trip
The Office of Student Organizations would love to
have you visit their new quarters in the Union and
meet the new staff members. Won't you join us in an

OPEN HOUSE

II

I

,'

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
.".. ....................
The Office of Student Organizations qualified instructors. Sponsored by Self-
would like to announce its new office Realization Fellowship. Call Linda after
hours. Mon.-Fri., 8:30 - 5:30 and 7 - 9 6 p.m. at 761-9825.
p.m. Mon., -Thurs. * * *
* *'* * UM Folk Dance Club. Every Friday
"Sex Without Babies", an informa- evening from 7:30 - 11:00. Barbour Gym
tive discussion with Mrs. Bates, former Teaching from 7:30 - 9:00. Open to all.
head of Ann Arbor Planned Parent- * * *
hood. Fri., Nov. 20 at 8:00 p.b. Lutheran UM Graduate Outing Club. Every Sun.
Student Chapel, 801 S. Forest at Hill St. rain or shine, 1:30 p.m., peet at Huron
* * * * St. side of Rackham where cars will
Ageless Science of Yoga. Instruction leave for an afternoon of hiking. Din-
In the yoga exercises as taught byj ner is optional after the hike.
29th Annual
Poor Richard's Folk Festival
75c ADMISSION
Friday, Nov. 20 9-1
FREE REFRESHMENTS
Newman Center Basement
331 THOMPSON
for information call 663-0557

ON

Gel"4ieS gwb'
,Pr~ietPb t
lo 1 . a

Friday, Nov. 20-3:00-5:00 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION, 3rd FLOOR

FREEDOyM! See England in peace
for only $529. A full 30 days of
INDEPENDENT bicycle camping
-includes air fare, bicycle, & camp-
ing equipment. Bicycle-Cgmpers
International, P. O. Box 13927,
Univ. Sta., Gainesville, Fla. 32601

EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

Office of Student Organizations

L

Peitiloning now open far:
f Central Student Judiciary
8 Seats
Petitions and information available at
SGC off ics (1 st Floor SAB)
Petitions must be in before Sunday,
Nov. 22, at 5:00
WOMEN AND MEN OF ALL SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
ARE URGED TO APPLY

Today, as it happens, I do feel like mentioning Miller High Life.
And what better way than to quote these immortal lines from Ozyman-
dias by the beloved Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, or "The Swedish
Nightingale," as he was better known as? I quote;
When an illwind blows,
And keeps getting iller,
Then a wise man knows
It is time for Miller.
What peppy hops! What groovy malts!
No beer can do what Miller does!'
One sip and-hark!-you hear a waltz,
And you love the world, including fuzz.
But I digress. Prexy, I say, is gone and nobody wants the job.
Where, then, will the colleges find replacements?
Well sir, a lot of schools lately have been hiring robots. Don't
laugh; you can get robots today with a bald spot and everything. In
fact, I recently saw one so lifelike that alumni were giving it money.
The big trouble of course is that after a few weeks as Prexy, any in-
telligent robot will say, "Who needs this?" and become a toll booth.
And so it remains unsolved, this Prexy problem, and in future
columns I'll look into it again, along with such other burning questions
as "Are roommates sanitary?" and "Can a student of 18 find happiness
with an econ professor of 90?"
* * *
Fes, it's true. We, the brewers of Miller High Life Beer, are relly
letting Max Shulman write whatever he wants in this column. Thai unrf
fled sobbing you hear is our legal department.

4

AUSTIN
DIAMOND

4

1209 S. University

663-7151

r
__ ____ _.

.. .. . a...,,,,, .. ", nnr...,, a.. .... rn r,,,r.... . .a........... ....... ......... . r..........."1...,.. r......,,. a.......,;.....r.. ...::"::":::: .
FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT
U. of M. at FLINT
ANNOUNCES
Study in Cuertiavaca, Mexico
-at CIDOC: CENTRO INTERCULTURAL DE DOCUMENTACION
ACCREDITED SPANISH
-5 hours daily
-3 students to each native-speaking instructor
-Conversational Spanish
-Language lab drills, briefings on linguistic problems
INTERDISCIPLINARY COURES IN ENGLISH, SPANISH
-Combining two or more of following areas: education, linguistics, anthropology, psychology,
economics, history, urban and ecological studies, architecture, sociology, philosophy, literature.
RESEARCH SEMINAR ON DISSENTING LIFE-STYLES
(June-July, 1971)
Sever..su...er sessions: June-Sept., 1971
FOR INFORMATION WRITE: Larry Grimes, Dept. of Foreign Languages,
2113, U. of M. at Flint, 1321 E. Court, Flint, Mich.-48503

\

(RI

EATE .. or s
The Michigan Daily
Advertising Dept. offers you
an opportunity to put your

I

I

i
" f
f
"
1
{

:. _:.: ."nr.::.":":":"i:-:":;i:::{7;;>:" ;{ :;}^ {{ r: i:?4: r'o%°}::%Sv:::"7. riri;:^:^': ': -: }i .'-'"".4: '-'
..........vr."r.^ },:^f4"::".";":+s.:.:E^.^:.":^is4:";:":":":areov7{.:."4:::tS :,!:F"?; 'r'.":%'r'?;:;:;;'r:".:"::::"r ....n..:'r::

. '}JJ:A1^:"^". ":::. .JTP:J ~.flLt4 P.f..?Ji..V "':r

WILD FLOWER
12 PRICE SALE
TAKE # OFF TAG

creative abilities into print.
Get good experience in
ad layout and design with
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CALL

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan