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November 17, 1970 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-17

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 17, :1974 ,

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, November 17, 1970 *

.. ......

_

..

theatre

Mimicking the poltical times

By MARK DILLEN
I'm not really sure if t h i s
should be on this page. Usually,
this space is reserved for re-
views of art where you c a n'
examine a production on levels
of tale'nt, etc. But you can't real-
ly examine the San Francisco
Mime Troop's performance last
night in the Union Ballroom in
that manner. You have to exam-
ine it on a political level first:
it comes no other way. If you
agreed with the politics, then
you examined the art. If not,
you probably left.
The whole message of the
Troop's two playlets was revolu-
tion. Because I agreed with their
politics, it was great on t h a t
level and the outstanding char-,
acterizations of the 11 players
merely embellished the effect,
Using a small 15' square wooden
stage for both plays, they had
to rely on the skill of the act-
ors. That great skill was soon
evidenced in the first play.
Entitled, "The Independent Fe-
male or A Man has His Pride."
the politically and dramatically
effective play soon had the
crowd hissing the villian a n d
cheering the heroine. Unlike the
archaic style of the melo-
drama, here it was used in a
modern biting way to demon-
strate the history and nature of
the repression of women in our
society.
Typically, it revolves around
the efforts of a latter day f em-
inist Sarah Bullitt and her at-
tempts to radicalize the brain-
washed leading lady Gloria Pen-
nybank. Gloria, you see, has ac-
cepted the traditional woman's
role without question and has
become engaged to a traditional
chauvinist, John Heartright.
Her mother, Matilda, and her
president of the Chamber of
Commerce father Walter, act as
convenient ploys for the viru-
lent attacks on the type of socie-
ty they represent.
The lines in the play' speak
for themselves. A g a i n, if you
reject the message their poli-
tics convey, you probably would
criticize the play on all other

DAILY OFFICIAL,
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Satudday and Sunday. Items appear
once only. Student organization
notices are not accepted for publi-
cation. For more information, phone
764-9270.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
Day Calendar
Wind Instrument Student Recital:
School of Music Recital Hall, 12:30 p.m.
Center for Human Growth and De-
velopment: Open house at 3 Center fa-
cilities: (1) Amphibian Facility, re-
search on frogs, Argus Bldg., Third and
Williams St.. (2) Computographics,
computerized storage of growth data,
611 Church St., (3) Electromyography of
muscle in monkey, HR 3028, Kresge
Hearing Research Inst., Ann St., 2-5
p.m.
German Dept. Lecture: Prof. E. Beh-
ler, U. of Wash., "Techniques of Irony
in the Light of the Romantic Theory,"
Assembly Hall, Rackham, 4:10 p.m.
Theoretical Seminar: H. Chan, CERN
Continued on Page 10)

Delta Sigma Delta
Dental Fraternity a
T.G.g
Fri., Nov. 20
6-9 p.m.
1502 HILL ST.
PETER

Tuesday, Nov. 17
SEVEN SAMAURI
dir. AKIRA KUROSAWA
The classic film by the
Japanese master.
WEDL COMMANCHE STATIONf
7 & 9:30
(note times) 75c
66 1Auditorium

4

levels. The old stereotypes are
constantly repeated: Jason Har-
ris, portraying Matilda, gives
the audience these classics.
"Why did I send you to college?
To get a husband," and "remem-
ber, the main job of a woman is
to make a man feel strong."
As the playwright, Joan Hold-
en, suggests, Matilda is a real
"Uncle Mom."
In the end of course, the male
spirit. shrivels when the t w 9,
finally organize the 500 sec-
retaries at Amalgamated Life
against their fifty male bosses.
In a classic revolutionary
scene, Walter, is trapped in his
office by the two female revolu-
tionaries. At gunpoint, Walter is
about to give into their de-
mands when John kills Sarah.
She manages, in true melodra-
matic form, to utter a final epi-

--Daily-Denny Gainer
taph: "She was shot in her Seale's courtroom experiences
back for refusing to live on it." and Black Panther party his-

Somehow, they performed so
that you could see humor and
insight in their lines, but after-
ward the reality of what they
were saying sinks . in: they
weren't trying to dazzle the
audience though they may have
achieved that effect. They were
trying to educate and arouse.
The spontaneous crowd reaction
at the end where the audience
cheered Gloria's address-politi-
cal speech, was the kind of thing
you wish to you had words to
describe. It was just beautiful.
The troupes next effort was a
bit harder to handle. It was an
eleven scene playlet depicting
events related in Bobby Seale's
book Seize the Time and t h e
transcript of the Chicago Seven
trial. It alternated between

tory;
It could have been more ef-
fective without the frequent
changing of scenes, and the tir-
ing, slow-motion manner of act-
ing and speaking in the court-
room sketches. The effect was to
confuse the audience rather
than increase their awareness.
Even so, the words of Seale
made up for whatever deficien-
cies ;there were in the play's
structure. When Steve Friedman
emotionally gave Seale's credo,
"you can kill a revolutionary but
you can't kill a revolution," it
was the message, not its deliv-
ery, that was important. And
the audience, then no longer
spectators but participants, were
quick to answer in force, "seize
the time."

DIAL 5-6290
Shows 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:10
0 7
IS THE MOST
MOVING1THE
MOST INTELLI-
GE THE MOST
HUMANE - ONTO
HELL WITH IT!
iT'S THE BEST
AMERICAN FILM
I'VE SEEN THIS
YEAR!"Y BN'Y KESAYT
AMIKE NICHOLS FILM
ALAN ARDIN
"A SUPERB, IMAGINA-
TIVE, AND FAITHFUL
ADAPTATION OF JO-
SEPH HELLER'S EXTRA-
ORDINARY BOOK! IT
ABOUNDS IN LAUGH-
TER!" -Wiliam wolf, CUE

Th

To

BOWEN
75c
omorrow-
HOOT
his Weekend:
JOHN ROBERTS
TONY BARRAND

the ann arbor
film co-operative
presents
w.c. fields and maewest
in
My- 11*te cplus short:
the tell-tale heart
tuesday, nov. '17

of

141'1 Ri/I STREET
Ub171

auditorium a
angoell haill
12 and under 35c

7 & 9:30
15c

OWN

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART
PRESENT
PUCCINI'S OPERA
"MADAME BUTTERFLY" (Sung in English)
Conductor: JOSEF BLATT Stage Direction: RALPH HERBERT,
MEN DELSSOHN THEATRE--NOV. 20-21-23-24 at 8 P.M

4p

Creative Arts Festival: Potpourri of events

By CHARLEEN COOK,
A Black Arts Festival and an
original student musical will
highlight UAC's 1971 Creative
Arts Festival, which is aiming
at more student participation
this year. The Festival will take
place through much of the
month of March.
The highlight of the Black
Arts Festival, the first such fes-
tival held by Creative Arts, will
be a performance by the Broad-
way cast of a play based on
Lorraine Hansberry's book, To
Be Young, Gifted, and Black.
The play will be performed near
the end of the festival at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre, and will
be cosponsored by the Profes-
sional Theatre Program (PTP.)
However, "the music is the
prime thing, really," according
to Black Arts Festival chairman
Dwight Andrews, and jazz work-
shQps from Detroit are expected
to come to "show how the music
has changed." There is also the
possibility of "s'ome music-or-
iented black group" performing,
according to Linda Jacobi,
chairman of the Art Committee
of which the Black Arts Festi-
val is one part.
Andrews adds that there is a
"very go'od possibility" of get-
ting LeRoi Jones as a lecturer.
There will also be'an exhibit of
student art works;
The student musical Friends,
r is scheduled for five days and
s ev e n performances starting
March 22, at t h e Residential
College Auditorium. The origi-
nal script is by Marilyn Miller,
with music by Dale Gonyea and
choreography by Wendy Shank-
in. A date for auditions has not
yet been set.

"We want to make musical
comedy relevant, and relevant
to people our age," says Miller.
"We feel that t h e groups on
campus, although they do very
fine shows, simply cannot uti-
lize.all the talent lying around."
Other festival programs in-
clude Cinema a n d Drama,
Dance, a n d Literature and
Journalism.
The Cinema and Drama Com-
mittee, according to chairman
Joseph Bartush, is trying to line
up either playwright Bruce Jay
Friedan (Scuba Duba; Steam-
bath), this year's writer-in-resi-
dence, or Catch 22 author Jos-
eph H e 11 e r. Cinema II is at-
tempting to get director Arthur
Penn, whose films include Bon-
nie and Clyde and Alice's Res-
taurant, while Cinema Guild has
contacted Orson Wells, famous
Shakespearean actor and pro-
ducer of Citizen. Kane and Fal-
staff who would show film clip-
pings as well as lecture.
Other attractions will include
the student musical, eight-mil-
limeter student films to be'
shown by the Ann Arbor Film
Co-op and a feature film by
either Cinema Center or United
Artists, with the producer and/-
or director as a guest lecturer.
Further possibilities, though
still tentative, are an anthology
of student experimental films
from a California group called
Cinema III, a n d the possible
premiers of a new Dustin Hoff-
man movie, Who is Harry Kel-
lerman?
The Erick Hawkins Modern
Dance Company is "almost cer-
tain," says dance committee
chairman Cynthia Sebstad, to
give performances and lectures

on dance, although the contract
has not been signed yet. The
company contains seven people,
of which "about three or four"
are dancers, the remainder be-
ing musicians. They are expect-
ed to give two performances,
two master-of-dance classes,
and lectures on both dance and
aesthetics.
The dance program also plans
to continue last year's "sensory
perception" workshops, in which
students form into small groups,
study a particular dance form,
walk about the campus obtain-
ing sensory experiences, t h e n
regroup to work with the per-
ceptions they have obtained.
An African dance lecture and
demonstration by a University
dance class and a lecture on
contemporary music are also
tentatively scheduled.
The literature and journalism
committee, like Cinema and
Drama, which is attempting to
contact Joseph Heller, is trying
to get Alan Watts, also author
of several books on Zen Bud-
dhism. Although several sources
'

connected with the festival have
said that Heller's coming is al-
most certain, obtaining either
him or Watts will be an expen-
sive process, and the Creative
Arts Festival 1 o s t money last
year.
Tentatively suggested as a lec-
turer on journalism, a n d ex-
pected to be less expensive, is
Roger Rapoport, former Daily
editor and author of "Is t h e
Library Burning?"
Loucks, who claims there has
been little emphasis on journal-
ism per se in past festivals, says
she would also like to do some-
thing with broadcasting, "some-
thing like closed circuit" (radio
or television).
Publicity committee co-chair-
men Audrey Kavka and Dave
Foran say that in the past stu-
dents have not always realized
that the individual events were
part of a larger festival. "The
festival this year is going to be
publicized as a whole and not
just as the individual forms,"
Kavka emphasizes.

Admission $3.00
Good Seats
Still Available

BOX OFFICE HOURS:
Nov. 16,-19-12:30-5 p.m.
Nov. 20, 21, 23, 24-
12:30-8 p.m.
Closed Sunday, Nov. 22
Ticket Information:
764-6118

Presentation

Wednesday & Thursday

November 17th & 18th

Department of Speech-Student Laboratory Theatre
presents
HOW HE LIED TO HER HUSBAND
by GEORGE BERNARD SHAW
and
EPISODE IN THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR
by JEAN ANOUILH
ARENA THEATRE, FRIEZE BUILDING
Promptly at 4:10 p.m. or earlier if theatre is filled. ADMISSION
FREE.

speaking

Hui

P.

I

TO

I gm@

ENDS WEDNESDAY
DIAL
8-6416 * 7- 9p.m.

Minister of Defense, Supreme Commander Black Panther Party
TONIGHT

Vlce. And Versa.

'F

HILL AUDITORIUM

8:00 P.M.

1 , . -.

Ii - ... . I

U

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