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November 12, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-12

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 12, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, November 12, 1970

cinema
Jagger's trip on a dinosaur

- i j

By BILL CLARK
Performance is an impressive,
fairly intelligent film which the
perverse publicity men at Warn-
er Brothers are calling "long
awaited". Meaning that it's
three years old, that it's b e en
ignored or blasted by every film
critic in New York, and that it
nearly wasn't released at all.
In July, 1969, Warner Broth-
ers was bought by Kinney Na-
tional Services, one of those
huge conglomerate corporations
that no one has ever heard of..
National Services? Well, jana-
torial services anyway, along
with parking lots and shoe stores
and Superman Comics and Jack
L. Warner, one of the last of
the dinosaur kings, was thrown
off his own lot when he created
a disturbance and interrupted
the shooting of a film on his
way out.
The new production staff,
shrewd businessmen all, hitch-
ed up their bellbottoms a n d
settled comfortably d o w n
amidst the bad-50's trappings of
the New York offices. There
they found Performance gather-
ing dust on the back shelves,
long since written off as a bad
investment. Why, Jack L. had
reasoned, should we release a
film we don't even understand?
Especially when we're so busy
oiling the armor for Camelot
and cutting Bonnie and Clyde
down to 90 minutes, so that we
can dump it on the drive-in cir-
cuits and maybe get our nega-
tive costs back.
I've always thought of Mick
Jagger as Oscar Wilde reincar-
nated; and Andrew Sarris has it
right when he says that Per-
formance is "the most deliber-
ately decadent film ever made."
What Sarris doesn't say is that
it's also the best drug m o v i e
ever made, that it makes some-
thing as banal as The Trip look
like a Hannah-Barbera c a r-
toon.
And that's impressive. The
Trip, Psych-Out, and (yes,
fans) even 2001 used pop-art,
Sike-ay-delic, solarized c o l o r
for their. "mindblower" effects.
Solarized color does very little
to suggest a genuine heavy drug
experience, and the technique
is so primitive that countless
amateurs have achieved it by
mistake while developing film

in their bathtubs. Easy Rider
was even further off the track
with its wide angle and fisheye
lenses.
The direction, a joint effort
by screenwriter Donald Cam-
mell and cinematographer Nich-
olas Roeg, is a bit limp in spots,
especially when it takes over 45
minutes to get Jagger on the
screen. Once he appears, how-
ever, the movie is a whole and
everything serves him well. The
photography is slick and evil
and overripe, which is to s a y
perfect. James Fox, Anita Pal-
lenberg and Michelle Breton
also look very good, with Fox
giving a rigorously technical
portrait of a London gangster
on the run.
'1776' set
for Sunday
1776, the spirited song and dance
musical about the events lead-
ing up to the signing of the
Declaration of Independence,
will launch The University's
Professional Theatre Program's
1970-71 Play of the M o n t h
series with two performances
Sunday (Nov. 15) at 2:30 and
8:30 p.m. in Hill Aud.
The only musical ever to be
presented in its entirety at the
White House (it was ' to help
celebrate Washington's Birth-
day in 1970). 1776 won the Tony
Award and the New York Drama
Critics Award as the best musi-
cal of the season.
This jocular, lyrical portrayal
of what happened during those
hot weeks of debate in Phil
adelphia nearly 200 years ago
was one of the surprise hits
of the New York season. No
one had thought that a gaily ex-
citing musical entertainment
could be made out of the solemn
historical event that gave birth
to the American nation.
Tickets available at the PTP
box office, in the lobby of the
Mendelssohn Theatre,from 10
a.m. - 1 p.m. and 2 - 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Hill
Aud. box office will open Sun-
day 12:30 - 5:00 and 6:00 - 8:30
for sale of special reduced rate
seats,

The soundtrack is superb. In
addition to Jagger's "M e m o
From Turner" are several songs
written and arranged by Jack
Nitzsche, with instrumental
solos by Ry Cooder and Buffy
Sainte-Marie, and vocals by
Merry Clayton and Randy New-
man.
The very last of the dinosaur
kings is Darryl F. Zanuck, t h e
man responsible for Cleopatra
and Dr. Doolittle. He recently
sunk $25 million into Tora!
Tora! Tora! Even the Japanese
staged a version for less. You
can buy shares of Zanucks'
company (20th-Century-Fox)
for $8 apiece. If you want to in-
vest in a dinosaur.

Ha
3large halls
plan
Su
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I Be
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PHO
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6 large wagons

ice-skating
iserka Lake
W. Huron River Dr.
-94 to Rawsonville exit
?NE: HUNTER 35010

..."

i
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DIAL 5-6290

4

-SPECIAL NOTE-
SNEAK PREVIEW THIS
FRIDAY NIGHT AT
9 P.M.
Preview Is A Comedy!
CATCH 22 shown
at 7 P.M.
PREVIEW at 9:05
CATCH 22 AGAIN
AFTER PREVIEW

I

-Daily-Tom Stanton

theatre

I

'Yeoman': Musical color

"Viewing Arkin is likewatching
Lew Alcindor sink baskets or
Bobby Fischer play chess. A
virtuosorplayer entering his
richest period! A triumphant
performance!" -TIME MAGAZINE

By ROBERT W. JONES
The Gilbert and Sullivan So-
ciety has produced a spirited
and colorful production of The
Yeoman of the Guard, the elev-
enth collaboration of English
coniposer Arthur Sullivan and
librettist William Gilbert.
Yeoman is the most serious of
all their operas, and in it they
attempted 'a plot of more than
their usual frivolous substance.
The production is highlighted
by some lexcellent performances
by many of the leads. Don
Camerony delivered a highly cre-
dible portrait of Jack Point.
His approach to diction, pitch,
and sound were commendable
and his treatment of Gilbert
and Sullivan is truly idiomatic.
Janet Smith presented a stun-
ning visual picture as E 1 s i e
Maynard, and her musical in-
terpretation was smooth and
glowing. Ter acting was a cre-
dit to the performance, as was
that of Phoebe played by Judii
Block, who sang with a high
degree of finesse, exhibiting a
voice of unusual color and
warmth. Jim Bryan's c I e a n
musicality and well centered
voice helped create the epitome
of the young romantic Fairfax.
Charles Sutherland perform-
ed with a high degree of qual-
ity that has become typical
through past productions. Both
Ronald Orenstein as Sergeant
Merin and Dr. George Gates as
Sir Richard Cholmondely were
vocally exciting, the latter add-
ing a welcome touch of dignity
and maturity to his role. T h e
acting of Sandra Yowik as
Dame.. Carruthers was good,
though her voice is rather small.
V~#S~fflCV..11P -0-00V ;X ...

Roberta Pauline as Kate look-
ed the part and moved well, but
her tendency to sing flat in-
jured some of the ensemble
work.
The chorus performed with
much gusto and became admir-
ably involved with the action.
'Their sound was a full and rich
blend, and the diction for the
most part was superb, a criteria
high on the list of priority in
G & S.
The staging and choregraphy
by Gershom Morningstar a n d
Nancy Gilmartin, respectively,
was lively and generally well
thought out. Several times
though, they blocked the stage
with the use of a front-line of
singers that was annoying,. and
tended to rely on semi-circle ar-
rangement for the chorus with-
out involving it in the action.
Some of the dancing, during
"Alas, I Waver to and Fro,"
and "A Man Who Would Woo
a Fair Maid," tended to be
cliche. In spite of such things
the over-all effect must be com-
mended.
The set by Jim Fellows was
brilliantly designed, and t h e
solution to the problem of the
opening scene in Phoebe's house
was cleverly solved. The steps
to the tower proved a handy
and useful level. The painting
of the set, though, could have
been better executed. Important
shadow and texture work was
omitted and the over-all ef-
fect of the wood beams, and
stone work lacked life; it was
just too flat in its result. Also,
unpainted nail heads in Phoe-
be's house reflected brightly at
the audience.

The costumes by Ann Cor-
rell were colorful and appro-
priate adding to an overwhelm-
ing visual effect. Unfortunately,
there were some problems with
lighting that became distract-
ing - the sky highlighting kept
lighting up at the wrong times.
There was no distinction in
the leadership from the pit.
Music director Dave Jorlett
reached a level of unparalleled
mediocrity in his treatment of
the total forces. The orchestra
fumbled to try to sound their
best, and instead played only
passably. It was the leads and
chorus that consistently re-
stored the ever-lagging pace. By
contrast, his preparation of the
chorus was highly musical and
precise, and illustrates musician-
ship.
One of the most difficult jobs
in the music business is to lead
from the pit. It demands moun-
tainous and impeccable tech-
nique, not the least of which
is the ability to produce a clear
up-beat.
A production with many fine
attributes: it is entirely worth
seeing.
I-

The
Calehd~aP
Every MONDAY:
FOOTBALL NIGHT, color TV
happy hour prices
Every TUESDAY:
APPLE WINE NIGHT-reduced prices
WEDNESDAY:
OLDIES BUT GOODIES with
Dan Erlewine's Jeweltones
THURSDAY, NOV. 12:
FLOATING OPERA RETURNS
9:30-11:30-Women half prices
F R IDAY, NOV. 13:
FLOATING OPERA AGAIN
9:30-1 :30
SATURDAY, NOV. 14:
1-94
9:30-1 :30
HAPPY HOUR EVERY WEEKDAY 4:30-7:00 P.M.
Food served until 1 :30 A.M. every night

4

r

,,,

1YWysCU E~dPO!M3 ~NuVa4wQdb 1a'nM iam'$ PuU
A MIKE NICKOLS FILM
ALAN ARKIN
JOSEPI4 HEIIER

ELTON $2"5
J /" H Nnext
JOHN superstar
Also Zappa, Derek,
Led Zeppeling 111, and
Freddie Hubbard's Red Clay
ON SALE THIS WEEK
STUDENTS
INTERNATIONAL STORE
330 MAYNARD

Chili! Yogurt! Choc. Fondue!
at the BACH CLUB
The place to meet
INTERESTING people
Michael Sloune
doc. student in flute
ACC. BY
CORNELIA SCHORR
will perform works by Tele-
mann, Loiellet, & Beirio.
Everyone Welcome
No musical knowledge needed
INFO: 663-2827, 769-2003
THUR., NOV. 12-8 p.m.
S. Quad, W. Lounge

a
a
z

v
C.)
F-
-o
(U
N
E
F--

BLACK STUDENT UNION
BENEFIT RALLY
"Seize the Time"
GUEST SPEAKER:
HUKY P.
NEWTON

*

m

MINISTER OF DEFENSE, SUPREME COMMANDER
BLACK PANTHER PARTY

4O

University Players and the English Dept.
PRESENT
UNIVERSITY of TORONTO

MANKYNDE
HOW'S YOUR MORALITY THIS WEEK?
Fri. and Sat., Nov. 13 and 14 at 8 P.M.
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE-Box office opens
Thurs. at 12:30, Fri. at 12:30; Sat. at 5:15
ALL SEATS $1.50!

........... {
i
i

Hill Auditorium

TODAY ONLY

Good seats available
Group Rate Information
Call Carol High 836-3719

DONATION: $1.50 in advance-$2.00 at the door
TICKETS on sale in the Fishbowl Daily
FREE ALL POLITICAL PRISONERS

Nov. 17, 1970

8:00 P.M.

. :

i

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Ann Arbor
Ring Day
November 12
9:00-4:00,at FOLLETT'S

Jewish Brothers and Sisters!
WHAT WAS AUSCHWITZ REALLY
LIKE? WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO US?
"NIGHT AND FOG"
A MOVIE AND.DISCUSSION
THURS., NOV. 12-8 P.M.
SHALOM HOUSE-1429 Hill St.

1.1

U. .

ON

[j

MEN'S RING, 10K YELLOW GOLD
Economy, Open Bock
Standard, Plastic-Closed
Deluxe, Gold-Closed
WOMEN'S MINIATURE RING,
10K YELLOW GOLD
Economy, Open Back
Deluxe, Gold-Closed

1

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Thurs-Fri.-Nov. 12-13
STR6IKE
dir. SERGEI EISENSTEIN 1924
The first film of one of the greatest directors

$39.50
44.50
50.50
30.00
32.00
GOLD
33.00
35.00

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Economy, Open Back
Deluxe, Gold-Closed

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Optional Features:
For White Gold 5
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One English or Block Letter
Two Greek Letters
Three Greek Letters
Full Name Engraved inside ring

5.00 1

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