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November 11, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The San Francisco Mimen Troupe
WABX & The U of Detroit present in Detroit
Fri., Nov. 13, Sat., Nov. 14
8:30 p.m.
Admission $2.00
at
The University of Detroit
Student Union Ballroom
Tickets Available at the Door

page three

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, November 11, 1970

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

Page Three

I
n e -wsbriefs
By The Associated Press
THE FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD pared its discount rate
from 6 per cent to 5% per cent yesterday in a move it said
reflects a general downward trend in interest rates.
While some viewed the cut as only a symbolic or technical action,
the decision is likely to lead to a decrease in the prime interest
rate, the amount Federal banks charge their biggest customers.
The move, less a stimulative than a following action, appears to
indicate a feeling by the board that inflation has been dampened
in recent months.
* * *
THE VATICAN announced yesterday that it has established
diplomatic relations with the European Common Market and
its other components.
The Holy See named a nuncio, or ambassador, to the community
composed of the market, the Coal and Steel community and the
Atomic Energy Union.
Archbishop Itino Cardinale will be the envoy following "the life
and activity of institutions which promote collaboration between
states in view of the supreme good of peace, and moral, cultural
and economic progress."
* *- *

Laird requests
more non-lethal
Guard weapons
WASHINGTON LT) - Secretary of Defense Melvin R.
Laird moved yesterday to provide the National Guard and
Reserves with more riot-control training and protective
equipment such as face masks, flack vests and wooden
batons.
Although the stated purpose is to reduce the risk of
injury to guardsmen in civil disturbances, Pentagon officials
made clear the action aims also at minimizing the much-
criticized use of firearms by guardsmen on riot-control duty.
Such criticism reached a cres-9

TOWARD AN UNDERSTANDING
OF HOMOSEXUALITY
An informal seminar
open to all interested persons
NOVEMBER 12, THURSDAY:
THE HOMOPHILE MOVEMENT IN THE U.S.
GUILD HOUSE, 802 MONROE ST.-7 P.M.
SPONSORED BY: THE OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
2282 S.A.B. 764-7442

THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT yesterday continued i ts
crackdown on reciprocal purchase agreements in the steel industry
with an antitrust suit against Bethlehem Steel Corp.
The suit against the nation's number two steel producer charges
Bethlehem with violating the Sherman Anti-trust Act by "entering
into combinations with various suppliers since 1956 in order to
restrain trade by reciprocal purchases."
* . .
1ST LT. WILLIAM CALLEY, JR. won the right at a prelimin-
ary court-martial hearing yesterday to argue that any massacre
at My Lai was the result of orders from superior officers.
The prosecution asked that the defense be barred from citing any
orders Calley might have received from his company commander,
Capt. Ernest L. Medina, who also faces court-martial in connection
with the My Lai incident.
THE OHIO GRAND JURY which investigated the Kent State
disorders never saw an important Justice Department report, re-
ported the Akron Beacon Journal yesterday.
Special prosecutor Robert Balyeat told the Beacon Journal that
the grand jury was not given the report, because it is "not normally
the practice to present to a grand jury conclusions of other persons.''
The Justice Department memorandum said that there was reason
to believe that Ohio National Guardsmen fabricated their story of
self-defense after four students were fatally shot and nine wounded
in a May 4 confrontation between guardsmen and anti-war protesters.
A SOVIET DESTROYER collided Monday night with the
aircraft carrier Ark Royal, Britain's biggest warship, top English
defense officials said yesterday.
The Defense Ministry withheld all details of the collision pend-
ing a naval board inquiry but disclosed that the carrier engines were
full astern at time of impact - an indication she was trying to
stop.
Two Soviet crewmen were thrown overboard and are still missing
in the Eastern Mediterranean, where Britain was holding naval
exercises under the watchful eyes of Soviet ships.
READ DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
CREDIT BY
EXAMINATION
FOR ENGLISH
COURSES
Ext minations
to be gven
Nov. 20th and 21st
SEE
Professor Mullin
TO REGISTER
444 Mason Hall
>:::: Deadline Nov. 12th

Picketers cheer in Pontiac
A group of strikers at Pontiac Motor Division cheer the announce-
ment yesterday that a tentative working conditions agreement has
been reached for some 14,000 workers. It is one of the largest
local settlements since the UAW strike began in September.
DEMANDS WAGE HIKES:
Rail union head sets
Dec. strike deadine

cendo after the confrontation last
May at Kent State University in
which four students were shot fat-
ally and nine wounded in a clash
with Ohio guardsmen.
"If the guardsmen are trained
and protected, they will be less
likely to react in certain extreme
ways out of fears," Pentagon
spokesman Jerry W. Friedheim re-
plied when asked whether the ac-
tion was in direct response to the
Kent State incident.
He said Laird would ask the
Senate next week to add $20 mil-
lion to the military appropriations
bill already passed by the House
to pay for the extra training and
new equipment.
Laird's action will mean extra
drill for about 320,000 men in
guard and reserve units with civil
disturbance missions, mostly in
the nation's urban areas. These
guardsmen now receive 33 hours of
riot-control training.
If Congress approves the Pent-
agon request, the guard will be
supplied with 140,000 face masks
and batons and 130,000 protective
vests.
The guard will receive. also
greater quantities of riot-control
equipment, including shot guns,
anti-sniper rifles, public address
systems, floodlights, radios a n d
tear gas.
"It is my policy," Laird declared,
"that the members of the Na-
tional Guard engaged in helping to
restore and maintain safety and
order will be in the best possible
position to exercise their duties
with minimum risk of injury."

Generals,
released
Sovi' ets
ANKARA, Turkey (P) - Two
American generals whose small
plane flew by error to the Soviet
Union Oct. 21 returned to An-
kara yesterday b u t they main-
tained silence on how they landed
in Soviet Armenia.
T h e incident, which threw a
chill into Soviet-U.S. relations,
occurred when a light plane car-
rying the two generals drifted off
course and landed in Soviet Ar-
menia.
The two were held. for two
weeks while talks were held to ar-
range their release.
An informed source said t h e
freed officers - Maj. Gen. Ed-
ward C. D. Scherrer, chief of the
American military aid mission to
Turkey, and his assistant, Brig:
Gen. Claude M. McQuarrie Jr. -
were under orders not to talk af-
ter they flew to Ankara.
One top American official said
he believed the matter would now
be kept under wraps to avoid pos-
sible aggravation of Turkish-
Russian and American-Russian
relations. "The questions may nev-
er be answered publicly," he said.

WASHINGTON UP) - A union'
leader said yesterday he will call
a nationwide railroad strike Dec.
11 unless the industry boosts a
White House board's proposed
wage increase, already the biggest
in rail history.
"This is not enough," President
C. L. Dennis of the Brotherhood
of Railway Clerks s a i d of the
board's recommendation for wage
hikes of 36 per cent over three
years for 500,000 workers now,
averaging $3.68 per hour.
The strike date is one day af-
ter delaying provisions of the
Railway Labor Act expire. Dennis
said once on strike, rail workers
probably would defy federal courts
and Congress if necessary and re-
main off the Job until they won
their demands for some 45 per
cent in wage hikes plus other ben-
efits.
We have complied with all ex-
isting laws - and if we go out
on Dec. 11, we stay out. It's as
simple as that," he said at a news
conference.
There have been only a f e w
brief nationwide rail walkouts in
the past half century. The courts,
Congress or the White House fre-
quently intervened to end or block
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged~ by students at the Universitv of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mai
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

such strikes on grounds they hurt
the national interest.
"We now intend to get justice
- and we are prepared to get it
at all costs. If I must lead my peo-
ple out on strike, it should be
clearly understood that they will
not go back to work until they
have received a w a g e increase
which will bring them up to com-
parability with the transporta-
tion industry," Dennis said.
The clerks' union is the largest
of four AFL-CIO unions in the
wage dispute, representing about
80 per cent of all rail workers.

DISCRIMINATION CHARGES
HUD to challenge cities' zoning

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AT LAST
THE
Michiganensian
YEARBOOK
will be on
SALE
in the Fishbowl
$7.00

WASHINGTON (P) - T h e
Department of Housing and Ur-
ban Development disclosed yes-
terday it has asked the Justice
Department to file the govern-
ment's first legal challenge to
suburban zoning practices that
exclude federally subsidized,ain-
terracial housing.
HUD wants action against
Black Jack, Mo. to overturn the
St. Louis suburb's Oct. 25 re-
zoning of a 25-acre tract that
excluded a planned 210-unit,
town house apartment develop-
ment.
"It is of the utmost import-
ance to this department that the
courts accept the principle that a
locality cannot employ its policy
powers to discriminate against
federally assisted housing for
the benefit of low- and moder-
ate-income families," Arthur J.
Gang, assistant HUD general

counsel, wrote last Friday to the
Justice Department.
HUD's so-called open-com-
munities strategy suffered a set-
back earlier this fall in Warren,
Mich, when the Detroit suburb
rejected a governmental demand
that it promote open housing
or lose federal urban-renewal
aid.
Voters in Warren defeated a
proposal in the recent election
calling for the establishment of
a human-relations board, a pre-
requisite to receiving federal
funds under the urban renewal
program.
HUD officials suggested pri-
vately the request was the open-
ing shot in the department's
long-promised campaign to in-
sure suburban housing opportun-
ities for inner-city, minority-
group families.

The push was delayed until
after last week's national elec-
tions because of its political
sensitivity, sources said.
HUD Secretary George Rom-
ney maintains ghettodispersal
is necessary because plants and
offices are being moved from
inner cities to suburbs.
Gang suggested the govern-
ment file its own suit against
Black Jack or Join the non-
profit sponsors of the town-
house development in an exist-
ing court action. He cited the
1968 Fair Housing Act as author-
ity.
"We recommend that you
frame a count charging unlaw-
ful and unconstitutional inter-
ference with the operation of a
federal program," Gang wrote.
Sponsors of the Missouri de-
velopmnent have approval f o r
mortgage-interest supplements
sunder the federal program enab-
ling low-income families to pur-
chase a home or cooperative
apartment.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

t

I,

Jewish Brothers and Sisters!

WHAT WAS AUSCHWITZ
LIKE? WHAT DOES IT MEAN

REALLY
TO US?

"NIGHT AND FOG"
A MOVIE AND DISCUSSION
THURS., NOV. 12-8 P.M.
SHALOM HOUSE-1429 Hill St.

IF YOU THINK YOU HAVE TROUBLES . . .
come to:
FREDERICK WISEMAN'S DOCUMENTARY
(producer of 'HIGH SCHOOL')
HOSPITAL
It may make you feel lucky lust to be olive!
" .HOSPITAL is a study of an institution or, more precisely,
of the people who serve and are served by a government-sup-
ported agency. The people of HOSPITAL can administer an emetic
to a young art student poisoned by a bad mescaline pill, they can
stand sympathetically by as he retches the poison out of his sys-
tem, . . . but they cannot cure his sickness. That is the theme of
the film. The people of HOSPITAL are in no position to practice
preventive medicine on an entire society."
taken from Life TV Review
Sponsored by: THE PROJECT COMMUNITY
ONE NITE ONLY-MONDAY, NOV. 16th
Architecture Auditorium-7:00 & 9:05 p.m.
Donation $1.00

111

I.'

11

IF

presents
Three Renowned Soloists from Russia-
Moscow
Trio
IN RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
FRI., NOV., 13, 8:30
Program:

"7he (e* n c the we4"
OPENS TONIGHT
NOVEMBER 11-14
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

University Activities Center
i Students International
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS
186.00
ROUND TRIP JET-
Dec. 27-Jan. 1......186.00
Jan. 1-Jan. 7........ 196.00
Feb. 26-Ma r. 5....... 189.00
Christmas through EASTER
The FREEPORT INN becomes
a STUDENT RESORT
All Student Guests
2 hour long "Happy Hour"
every evening with
Live Music & Dancing

TICKETS-$2.50 Evening Performances
y}~fr C .~-k~..~

11

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