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November 11, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-11

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November l 1, 197©

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, November 11, 1970

rec arus

A 'New
By JONATHAN MILLER
You know you're going to have
trouble writing a record review
when you tear up your first
page more than five times. Ten
pieces of paper ago I knew I
was going to have trouble re-
viewing New Morning (Colum-
bia), my favorite singer's lat-
est album.
I started out by writing that
Dylan had. sold out. T h e n I
thought that maybeit was my
fault. so I wrote that it was my
fault and that I just didn't un-
derstand what he was doing,
but* that it was great anyway.
Having concluded, w h i1le
scrumpling up that piece of pa-
per, that ,I really did know, I
started once again and wrote a
mere three lines before aban-
doning the attempt.
Well, on the one hand it has
to be said that I like the old
Dylan. That is not to say that
I don't like the new, post-Nash-
ville Skyline Dylan, just t h a t
I'm a traditionalist and I grew
up with it, and - hell if I got-
ta change now ...
But, Dylan said things back
then that changed my life,band
it would be presumptuous of me
to - ignore his recent composi-
tions and recordings.
So' I tried, God did I try. I
lit-up, sat back and turned on;
the record player. Nope, no
communication at all. I wasn't
listening.
I tried a simpler method. I
Just turned on the record play-
er.,

Morning' for a mellower Dylan

Dylan's voice is oh so sweet
now, so strange, so incredibly
mellow. Listening to Dylan's
new record is like drinking an
aged, mellow wine. It refreshes,
it never insults, it never en-
croaches, it's simply a delight-
ful experience.
Dylan's life is different now,
and so is the world. The chang-
es that have happened to us all
have happened to Dylan and he
is no longer furious at t h e
wrong, he is aware of it. He
is mature enough to know the
good, and to love it. He is sing-
ing about love - and animals
- and God. Not pimps and peo-
ple who threw him out saying,
"you aint nothin' but a hill-
billy - we want FOLKSING-
ERS here."
New Morning is musically
tremendously tight. It is n o t
loud, j u s t perfectly recorded
and its all star cast of music-
ians, Harvey Brooks, Ron Cor-
nelius, Charlie Daniels, Al Koop-
er among others never step ov-
er that line where back-up be-
comes take-over.
The last two cuts on side one
may take a little adjustment on
all of our parts. But they are
so different, especially the su-
per-strange "If Dogs Run Free,"
with female singer Maeretha
Stewart up there behind in the
stereo separation.
"Winterlude," in the same
vein somewhat isinothquite so
hard to get into, but it may be
that some people have trouble.
The first part of side one is
tremendous. Dylan plays piano

on all the songs except t h e
first, "If Not For You" and al-
though it is not entirely clear
who is playing what, the over-
all 'effect is powerful and mov-
ing.
"Day of the Locusts" is
strange and interesting, with a
background that may be just
destroyed on a c h e a p record
player. The lyrics are pure Dy-
lan but are even more subtle
than it may at first seem. The
streams of poetry that Dylan
emanates are constantly chang-
ing but the poetry remains,
sometimes hard to find, always
worthwhile.
Perhaps the most convention-
ally Dylanesque song on t h e
side is "Went to see the Gypsy."
It is a song so good that the on-
ly believing is the hearing. Once
again, D y I a n is pouring out
those lyrics that make every-
one else, nearly, second rate,
and some of my favorite musi-
cians are second rate compared
to Dylan. (There is no evil in
coming second to Bob).
The first side will end and it
is brobably as good an idea to
play it again - right away -
as it is to turn the record over.
It may be necessary to repeat
this procedure a few times but
eventually t h e pay-off comes
and it's worthwhile.
"New Morning" is the title
cut: track one, side two.
While Dylan is almost cosmic
at times, he is always an enter-
tainer too and h is ability to
simply do that is apparent on
this side of your highly expen-
sive sheet of plastic. Lots of
love around as the arm sweeps
across the record at 33 plus rev-
elations a minute, "One More
Weekend," "The Man in Me."
"Three Angels" was my high-
point of the b/w. Like a cata-
logue of people that never pick
you up hitching, Dylan sings of

those whom he cannot reach
and of those he can. The; song
is, according to the annotations
I made on the sleeve, "smooth
and simple" and, I tell myself,
"moving." It's kind of like the
effect that T. S. Eliot creates,
but more so as it is music too.
(Maybe that is unfair to Eliot.)
"Father of Night" is a b o u t
God, of whom "We most sol-
emnly pray."
Period?
It is a 'bring me up,' and it's
also something of a shock.
WHAT IS HE SINGING IN
THE N A ME OF DAMNA-
TION ..?
Right, or rather, wrong. Dy-
lan made it a new morning
and he's home. Too much.
Kristal poetry
Kris Kristofferson is probab-
ly best-known as a songwriter
of some repute.
He has written for such coun-
try artists as Johnny Cash for
years, but until now he has not
recorded an album on his own.
At last, after much persua-
sion from many friends, whose
names would read like a com-
pendium of country singers,
Kristofferson has come out with
an L.P., and it's titled simply,
Kristofferson (Monument).
The first side is more uncon-
ventional than the second, the
first cut, "Blame it on the
Stone's" is weak because, I
think, it was over-recorded. The
second, "Winter Time in Nash-
ville," is also slick, but Krist-
offerson's enormous vocal range
is demonstrated for the first
time, and there are better
things to come.
From this point the album
only gets better. The incredible
"The Law is for protection of

the people" is social criticism at
its best. Kristofferson, using the
cleverest weapon of all, the other
guy's weakness - in this case
religion.
The opening of the song con-
cerns the plight of a drunk,
arrested by the police. Sym-
pathy can be had for the.
drunkard if you are a product
of the social changes that have
happened to young people over
the last fifteen years, but to
your ordinary, country lovin,'
car worker-student hater, or
whatever, the police are right.
The police are also right when
they hol ddown "hommilly hip-
pie," all five "strapping brave
policemen" and "cut off all dear
Hommilly Hippie's hair."
The last verse is where the
punch comes lyrically, but mu-
sically the whole song is very
tight, well sung and well or-
chestrated.
The second side of the record
is also good. It can take a little
longer to appreciate what Krist-
offerson is doing on this half of
the record, but the effort is
worthwhile and it would be to
destroy the thrill of suspense to
detail it.
This album is a good exam-
ple of the type of progressive
country music that is now creep-
ing onto the market as it be-
comes faddish.
The record is on "Monument,"
which has some other good peo-
ple signed-up. I'll tell you about
them just as soon as the dis-
tributor starts to send me some
review copies. The label looks

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r mnto
Room 3528 L. S. A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11
Day, Calendar
Postgraduate Medicine: International
Symposium on Drug Abuse, Rackham,
8:50 a.m.
Anatomy Seminar: G. McBride, "Cy-
tological Investigations in Algae," Med.
Set. II S. Lecture Hall, 1:10 p.m.
Geography Seminar: W. Fish, U. of
Ill.: "Measurement of an Constraints
on Diet in Rural Brazil," 4050 LSA, 3:15
p.m.
Botany Seminar: S. Adams, U. of
Wisconsin, "Ecological Interpretations
of C02 Exchange Studies on s o m e
Selected Native Plants", Matthael Bo-
tanical Gardens, 4 p.m.
Statistics Seminar: R. L. wright,
"Bayesian Estimation of a Nuclear
Functional Relationship with ErrorsIn
the Variables," 4205 Angell Hall, 4
p.m.
Physics Colloquium: .P M. Platzman,
Bell Labs, "Compton Scattering from
Electrons in Solids and Molecules,"*P&A
Colloq Rm., 4 p.m.
Center for Russian and East Euro-
(Continued on Page 8)
I DIAL 5-62901

rig-CAMPUS

N....mm.

Vice.AndVersa.

f

DIAL 8-6416

Mick Jagger.

And Mick Jagger.

w
4

I ~peromnej

Wednesday, Nov. 11
INTRUDER IN THE DUST
dir. CLARENCE BROWN 1949
With Juano Hernandez, Claude Jarman,
Jr., Elizabeth Patterson.
Based on the Faulkner novel. "Inflexible
Lucas," 'the maddening Negro' is conceived
as a focus of white ambivalence.
SHORT: Ben Turpin in "Cross-Eyed Lover"
THURS.-FRI.: Eisenstein's Strike
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 7CAUDITORIUM

r

I

Fimproducer togive
communication talk
Worthington Miner, a leading member of the theatre and
television Hall of Fame for his distinguished contributions as a
producer, director and innovator, will visit Ann Arbor tomorrow
from New York where he heads the American Academy of Dra-
matic Arts.
His visit to the University will be jointly sponsored by the
Professional Theatre Program and the theatre and radio-television-
film areas of the speech department.
Miner will speak at 3 p.m. in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre on
the topic of "Search for Communication." The speech is open to
the public.
Miner has staged over 30 Broadway successes including Reunion
in Vienna, Bury the Dead, Both Your Houses, On Your Toes, and
Blind Alley. He left the executive board of the New York Theatre
Guild in the 40's to head Network Program Development at CBS-
Television. His notable productions for CBS include "Studio One"
and the "Play of the Week."
Miner's film productions include the prize-winning film The
Pawnbroker starring Rod Steiger and The Fool-Killer with An-
thony Perkins.
Since 1965 Miner has headed the American Academy of Arts
as president.

as though it might
teresting one.
E LTON
JOHN

be an in-

I

next
supe rsta r?

If you must wear clothes at all

Renaissance

coming soon

ENDS WEDNESDAY

Also Zappa, Derek,
Led Zeppeling IlIl, and
Freddie Hubbard's Red Clay
ON SALE THIS WEEK
STUDENTS
INTERNATIONAL STORE
330 MAYNARD
2$1.502m

Shows 1,3, 5, 7, 9:10
IS THE MOST
MOVINGCTHE
MOST INTELLIM
GENTICTHE MOST
HUMANE - OH1TO
HELL WITH IT! -
IT'S THE BEST
AMERICAN FILM
I'VE SEEN THIS
YEAR! "-VNETCBY
A MINE NICHOLS FILM
ALAN ARKIN
JOSEPHRE R
MARTIN BALSAM; INCHRIIB[NJAMIN; ARTHURINNKHt
JACK G IICKIW~R;BOBN[WIIMT; ANTHNY PERWAN
PAIPRENSS; MARTINSHEEN; JNVIC&
ORSON WELLES ASOIIIIOI. SCR~ffBMNMET
PRODIUCEDY JBN CAUIY MARTIN RANSONff
IRECTEDBYM1KE NICHOlS nmmetmu- mea
"K I1T E IIW d~NT mAT 61Ww *1

I

The
0444ev
Caleh da,
Every MONDAY:
FOOTBALL NIGHT, color TV
happy hour prices
Every TUESDAY:
APPLE WINE NIGHT--reduced prices
WEDNESDAY:
OLDIES BUT GOODIES with
Dan Erlewine's Jeweltones
THURSDAY:
FLOATING OPERA RETURNS
9:30-1 1 :30-Women half prices
FRIDAY:
FLOATING OPERA AGAIN
9:30-11:30
SATURDAY:
1-94.
9:30-11:30
HAPPY HOUR EVERY WEEKDAY 4:30-7:00 P.M.
Food served until 1 :30 A.M. every night

1

I

WI

Corner State & Liberty Sts.
DIAL 662-6264
OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
ANDY WARHOL'S VINYL?
andt
MARIE MENKEN'S ANDY WARHOL
TONIGHT
CANTERBURY HOUSE--330 Maynard
7, 9, 1 1 P.M. Admission 75c

The Sidelong Glances
ofa PigeonKicker
Meek Jonathan.
The very day he graduated PrincetonR
he became a New York taxi driver. t "
(Then, he met Jennifer.)
"2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY" STARTS THURSDAY!
a a
-'-^ 0 Waq 0 RRC
'~L'~' ~0e~0q R.kkLm
0 o
cof 0e o (dIscustons
______ ~ Pa~trY) (E THrmi
rtenS t

U

I

"'JOE' is not merely an extraordinary film; it is a
small artistic miracle. Only rarely in the turmoil of
human events does a work of such brutal directness
to the core truths of the conditions of life that no
matter what one's beliefs, there is no denying its
validity. 'JOE' is approached for sheer impact and
importance only by 'Z,''PATHS OF GLORY,' and the
final scenes of 'EASY RIDER.' No one conceiving
this film, a year ago, could have known how loudly
it would speak today. It is a one-in-a-million."
--Harlan Ellison, L.A. Free Press
HELD
of course
I

David
Bromberg
has accompanied
Jack Elliot
Rosalie Sorrels
Pat Sky
etc., etc.
played lead
guitar on all
of Jerry Jeff
Walker's albums,
& Bob Dylan's
last two albums,
just did a joint
concert with
Paul McCartney
is England,
and is a FINE
Blues &
Country
Singer
& Songwriter
NEXT WEEK:
John Roberts
&
Tony Barrand

Fm

The Contemporary Jazz Quintet
IS
CHARLES MOORE-Trumpet '.
LEON HENDERSON-Tenor Sax, Flute
KENNY COX-Acoustic, Electric Piano
RON BROOKS-Acoustic, Electric Bass j2)x
ARCHIE TAYLOR-Percussion
Saturday, Nov. 21-8:30 P.M. Trueblood Aud.
TICKETS $2.00 at Union, Discount Records, Students International Store

7

Look at all you get!
0 round trip jet air transportation
* transfers and baggage handling
0 7 nights hotel accommodations
0 7 "Happy Hours"
0 Gala New Year's Eve Party
RESERVATIONS LIMITED

1I~;WED*I

0

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