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October 27, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-27

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 27, 197a

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, October 27, 1970

Make your vacation mean something!
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SOPIA SHOW '70 presents:

By MORT NOVECK
Back at the beginning of the
season it used to be easy for Bo
Schembechler to pick the football
team's offensive champion of the
week: with the offense doing more
sputtering than scoring there was
usually only one choice.
.The situation has improved,
however, and it has now become
difficult to single out a n y one
player as superior. After viewing
the films from Saturday's 39-13
mashing of Minnesota, Schem-
bechler came up with six players
who were "all great." The six in-
cluded Reggie McKenzie, , Dan
Dierdorf, Fritz Seyferth, Glenn
Doughty, Don Moorhead and Bil-
ly Taylor.
Taylor was eventually selected
as the champion, but the coach
describes the decision as "v e r y
close." Tipping the balance f o r
Taylor was the Minnesota con-
test, his second consecutive out-
standing performance. As Sch-
embechler said, Taylor gained ov-
er 300 yards in 55 carries in two
games and that's moving the foot-
ball."
Schembechler was also un-
stinting in his praise of the other
five. "Seyferth played a g r e a t
game. The four touchdowns don't
mean that much but he blocked
and ran very well. Doughty also
played another fine game and Mc-
Kenzie and Dierdorf rated very
highly. McKenzie is a fine offen-
sive guard; he buried guys in that
game."

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Nov. 5-8 p.m.
Nov. 6-7 & 10 p.m.
Nov. 7-7 & 10 p.m.

tickets for

OPENING NIGHT
will be on sale

w

this Thursday & Friday
Oct. 29-30, in the FISHBOWL

Since they scored over 30 points
for the second straight week, the
entire offensive squad was named
to the Victor's Club. The defen-
sive squad was not to be outdone,
however, and the entire unit was
also honored with selection to the
Victors'
As Schembechler said, "This
was the best balance we've had. I
couldn't single out one guy who
didn't play well enough for us to
win."
He did, however, single out a
defensive player who performed
better than the rest. "Jim Betts
played an outstanding game," he
noted, "he was beautiful. He re-
ceived a perfect grade of 100 for
his showing and that's the first
100 we've ever had for a whole
game."-
Betts' accomplishment is all the
more impressive when it is re-
membered that up until six weeks
ago he had never played a game
at safety. "He's becoming accus-
tomed to his position," Schem-
bechler commented. "He needed
experience, but we knew that he
could do it. With half aseason
under his belt he got the, exper-
ience now."
Henry Hill was also singled out
for special praise. "Hill was great.
There's no way to block him out
effectively."
With both units named to the
Victor's Club it would seem that
Schembechler is fairly satisfied
with the way the Wolverines are
progressing. "We're getting better
each week," he stated. "The only
question is can we continue to im-
prove."
Though he thinks that the pro-
gress will come, Schembechler
qualified his optimism by voicing
the doubt that has been plaging
him all season: "The thing that's
most important is that we stay
free from injuries and I'm n o t
sure that we can do that."
Looking back at the Minnesota
game, Schembechler feels that it
was a good contest in the first
half. "In the second half things
opened up offensively for us," he
added, "but it was close at first.
Minnesota is better than a year
ago."
Looking ahead to this week's
game with Wisconsin, which is as
far as he allows himself to look,
Schembechler isn't taking any-
thing f o r granted "I originally
said that if we g ot by Purdue,
Michigan State and Minnesota we

would be all right until the last
game," Schembechler admitted,
"but after looking at the films I
have to say that Wisconsin can
beat us. It's going to be a tough
game.
Wisconsin is better t h a n the
Wisconsin team of a year ago,"
the coach observed. "They have
the same quarterback' who played
well against us a year ago. They
also have Alan Thompson who is
a good fullback. His partner in
the backfield, Rufus Ferguson, is
a short squatty kid (5- 6", 190
pounds) who went 50 yards from
scrimmage for a touchdown to
open a game."
The Badgers also have good re-
ceiving and several good defen-
sive players, according to Schem-
bechler. "If you look at w h a t
they've given up so far, the de-
fense is pretty darn good. It is
also consistent."
Consistency is one thing that
Michigan has lacked recently as
far as offensive kicking has been
concerned. The punting has been
consistent all season, with Paul
Staroba averaging 41 yards a kick,
but field goals and extra points
have been few recently. "It's just
like a golf swing," said Schem-
bechler, "as soon as you get a little
off you're in trouble. Our kickers
are just out of the groove now."

1f

-Associated Press
JIM VALEK, Illinois head coach, shown during the fourth quarter of Saturday's loss to Ohio State,
was fired and rehired this weekend. The announcement of his firing came just prior to the start
of Saturday's game. After the game, under threat of a player's strike, Illinois rehired Valek. Illinois
led in the game until late in the third quarter, before succumbing 48-29. Valek was rehired until
the end of the season.

I

-

11

NORTHWESTERN TO PASADENA?
Wild weekend .for

I

Illinois teams

How About a Change
in Life Style?
AMERICAN STUDENTS FOR ISRAEL
Winter Kibbutz

Hairstyling
To Please
NOW 4 SHOPS
ARBORLAND
MAPLE VILLAGE
LIBERTY OFF STATE
EAST UNIV. AT SO. UNIV.

-0
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Project

L
F

THE DASCOLA BARBERS

By JIM EPSTEIN
For the first time in me-
mory both Illinois representa-
tives in the Big Ten made head-
lines. Illinois gave Ohio State
its biggest scare of the season
before being inundated in the
final period and had its coach
fired and rehired all in one
weekend.
Meanwhile, the Northwestern
Wildcats, something of a Cin-
derella team, convinced a few
people that they are not t h e
temporary product of a fairy
godmother with a 38-14 victory
over Purdue.
The real excitement in Illin-
ois occurred off the field. Be-
fore the kickoff, it was learned
that Illini coach Jim Valek
would be fired after the game.
The players responded to the
news by playing their best foot-

For the student body:

DEPART - New York, Dec. 16, 1970

RETURN

- New York, Jan. 6, 1971

DENIM
FLARES

Work 2 weeks on the Kibbutz
and travel at your leisure the
final week.
Cost 330. Round Trip
IF INTERESTED, CONTACT:
Mrs. Laurie Gelwick
Chairman A.S.F.I.
c/o Kibbutz Aliya Desk
220 S. State Street
Chicago, Illinois 60604
Tel. 312-939-6428

$4.88

I

"... there is no career that can match business in diver-
sity of intellectual interest . . . A vigorous, free society
calls for the highest type of business leadership . ."

ball of the year. The Illini, not
one of the conference's toughest
teams, nearly pulled the upset
of the year, leading late in the
third quarter, until the Bucks
pulled away with 25 points in
the last 19 minutes of play.
The Illinois offense t o r e
through the OSU defense
throughout the first half. Quar-
terback Mike Wells hit end Doug
Dieken for a score and slip-
pery Darrell Robinson squirm-
ed through the Buckeye line with
good runs.
But the high flying Illini
were brought down to earth by
fullback John Brockington, who
led the revised OSU offense to
victory.
Then the fun began.
After the game Valek re-
leased a statement from" co-
captains Dieken and KirkMc
iMc Millan which read, "If coach
Valek is not here Monday, the
University of Illinois does not
have a football team.
The ballplayers had voted un-
animously to strike, and faced
with that threat, Gene Vance,
the athletic director, met with
the players and later announced
after a quick call to the Board
of Directors, that Valek had
been rehired for the balance of
the year.
Meanwhile, a few miles to the
north, the Northwestern'Wild-
cats were starting to look west,
specifically in the direction of
Pasadena.
The Wildcats, after two vic-
tories over Illinois and Wiscon-
sin, were supposed to get their
first Big Ten test from the Boil-
ermakers, but they handled Pur-
due with relative ease.
Junior quarterback Maurie
Daigneau had a sparkling day,
hitting on 14 of 21 aerials and
two touchdowns, both to split
end Jim Lash.
Mike Adamle, Northwestern's
powerful fullback had another
solid performance against t h e
Boilermakers, picking up 154

yards in 39 carries, giving him
646 yards for the season, only
20 short of the all-time North-
western record. In addition,
Adamle threw a touchdown pass
to split end Jerry Brown, cov-
ering 26 yards.
The Wildcats pass defense,
which had allowed only one out
of three aerials to be complet-
ed against it, had another fine
performance last Saturday,
picking off four passes. Corner-
back Jack Dustin grabbed three
of the errant tosses himself and
ran back for a score.

Reg. $8.00 quality

I

Preseason jokes about the
chances of the Wildcats run-
ning for the roses are still taken
as jokes, but a victory over Ohio
State next week will virtually
send the Cats packing for Pasa-
dena.
But even should Northwest-
ern fall to the Buckeyes, t h e y
still have a chance at the Rose
Bowl. If the Buckeyes should
lose a game, like, on November
21, say, they will tie with North-
western. Because Northwestern
has not gone to Pasadena for so
long, it might get the nod.

w

THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

CHECKMATE

Broncs bu
Kickers, re
By RANDY PHILLIPS
The early morning fog had lift-
ed but Michigan's soccer players
still could not find the goal often
enough and dropped a 4-2 decision
to Western Michigan's varsity Sat-
urday at Fuller Field. Michigan
then emerged a 3-0 winner over
United at Toledo Sunday.'
A better conditioned and dis-
ciplined Bronco squad put the
pressure on early and wore down
the more skilled Wolverine eleven
with its short passing game and
ball-hawking defense.
The first quarter was scoreless
despite the speedy Broncos' num-
erous penetrations into the Mich-
igan zone.
Shortly after the start, WMU
sprang a wing free with another
Bronco trailing, but Pierre Mereau
recovered to knock the ball back
to midfield.
After being completely outplay-
ed in the first quarter, the Wol-
verines showed a litte more of-
fensive strength in the second
half-hour of play. Michigan had
a good rush early into the period

st booters;
bound,30
and nearly had a goal off a corner
kick.
But Western Michigan came
right back with a break-away. A
Bronso goal was avoided only by
ant excellent save by Wolverine
goalie Karl Krotki.
Midway 'into the quarter the
Broncos put on a determined of-
fensive thrust and scored after
repeated shots at the goal. The
tally came after Krotki had made
a save.
The third quarter began as the
first with Western Michigan pres-
suring the Michigan defense. The
result was another goal, but it was
a rather cheap one.
Michigan goalie Krotki dove for
a shot on goal and appeared to
have it covered, but the ball hit a
bump and bounced high over the
prone Krotki and into the net.
Michigan scored on a goal by
Ulrich Dagge a little later in the
quarter to narrow the margin to
2-1.

invites you to meet its Admissions Representative,
MR. PETIE DUKES

MI

I I

State St. at Liberty

ON

I

I

PUT YOUR TALE

TO GOOD USE
The Michigan
Daily Advertising
Dept. offers you
an opportunity to
put your creative
abilities into print.
Get good experience
in ad layout and
design with The
MICHIGAN DAILY
CALL
164-0554 or 164-0560
for appointment

NT

0
3

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Tuesday, November 3, 1970
to discuss the Stanford M.B.A. and Ph.D. Programs in
Business Administration.
Appointments to meet with Mr. Dukes may be
made through the Bureau of Appointments.
The M.B.A. Program is a two-year general management
course particularly designed for students who have ma-
jored in liberal arts, humanities, science, and engineer-
ing. The purpose of the Doctoral Program is to train
scholars for the stimulating challenge open to business
educators, researchers, and innovators.

ARTISTS
WANTED

I

gICH-
o limit .L

I

to contribute illustrative material to the h
IGAN"ENSIAN, U. of M.'s Yearbook. N

"QUALITY

SOUND
through

on subject matter. (Black and white preferable.
Nothing larger than 15"x16"). All work will be
returned by publisher. For further information,
call Katrina at 761-3314 or 'Ensian office, 764-

The Bronco's third goal was a
duplicate of their second as a hard
shot trickled by Krotki. The Wol-
verines came back to within one
point as George Schuder kicked in
a centering pass from Pana'etos.
Western Michigain scored once
more as Bronco forward outfought
Wylie Livingston for the ball and
raced in towards the Michigan net
for the tally.
Michigan captain Miguel Taube
commented after the match, "We
played like we could, but we have
limitations on fitness. They can
run, and played together and know
where to pass."
Throughout the match it was
evident that Western Michigan
had a much sharper passing game
and a more coordinated defense.
But the individual skills of the
Wolverines allowed them to stay
close.
In Sunday's match against
United of the Toledo League
Michigan could muster a playing
force of only ten. But despite this
disadvantage, the Wolverines over-
powered their opponents while
using a 3-3-3- line-up. Goals by
Jean Gilles, Daniel Boyle, and
Helmouth Norpoth accounted for
the Michigan scores in a game
that had little excitement.
Next Saturday's contest with
the University of Kentucky has
been canceled, but the Wolverines
will continue their quest for the
Toledo League championship with
a match against the Bavarian
Kickers on Sunday at Toledo.

0561.

s

QUALITY

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EVERY PAINT STORE SELLS PAINT

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