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October 27, 1970 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-27

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'uesdoy, October 27, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

u~sday, October 27, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

r

,i

STER E O SP ECI AL
JustArrived-Huge Shipment of
GARRARD and DUAL Changers
JENSEN and MARK Ill Speakers
withI
SHERWOOD, SCOTT or KENWOOD Receivers
for our annual 2 week student sale
Get your special discount if you qualify
MAKE YOUR DEAL IN PERSON AT
Hi-i1Sudio
121 W. WASHINGTON 668-7942'
Across from Old German Restaurantt

,

AGNEW SPEECH:
Southerner will be
named to high court

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I N

University of Michigan School of Music
presents
1970 Festival of
, Contemporary Music
Second Concert
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 8:00 P.M.
Rackham Lecture Hall
Guest composer: Alberto Ginastera
Haubenstock-Ramati: Interpolations
Nelson Hauenstein, flute
Ginastera: Concerto per Corde
Michigan Chamber Ensemble, Theo Alcantara, conductor
Chudacoff: Five Pieces for Piano
Dady 'Mehta, piano
Ginastera: Bomarzo, cantata
Michigan Chamber Ensemble, John McCollum, narrator,
Charles Roe, baritone, Thomas Hilbish, conductor
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30
MUSIC BY IVES, SCHOENBERG, GINASTERA
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
Advertising contributed by Chi Choper, Pi Kappa Lambda

(Continued from Page 1)
cal balance on the Supreme
Court."
"His resolution to achieve t h a t
balance will never waver, despite
those radical liberals who still con-
trol the Senate," Agnew added.
The vice president said Hayns-
worth was "plainly the vic-
tim of Anti-Southern bias."
"But the pledge was -sand the
pledgestill is - that this admin-
istration will appoint and see con-
firmed a Southern strict construc-
tionist on the Supreme Court, he
continued.
"And you of South Carolina," Ag-
new said, "will see that pledge
redeemed."
Haynsworth, chief judge of the
U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals
at Richmond, Va., and a resident
of Greenville, was defeated 52-
47 by the Senate.

In April, Nixon's second ap-
pointee to the court, federal judge
G. Harrold Carswell of Florida,
was rejected 51-45. In May, the
Senate confirmed Judge Harry
Blackmun of Minnesota.
Agnew was campaigning in South
Carolina chiefly for congressman
Albert Watson, who is in a tight
race for governor against Lt. Gov.
John West, the Democrat nominee,,
and two other minor candidates.
Republicans have not controlled
the South Carolina governorshipI
since the days of Reconstruction.
Agnew's Greenville speech in-
cluded attacks on Hubert H. Hum-
phrey, Clark M. Clifford a n d
Ramsey Clark, and reaffirmed the
administration's opposition to,
busing school pupils.
The crowd cheered and, ap-
plauded Agnew three times during
his mention of the Supreme;
Court.
Later in his speech, when hej
brought up busing, he got a stand-I
ing ovation.
Referring to the recent visit to
Asheville, N.C., by Nixon, Agnew
said the President had made "it
crystal clear once again our stand
on busing and neighborhood
schools.
"My friends," Agnew said, "you
take that for gospel. He was talk-
ing from his heart. We flatly op-
pose compulsory busing solely for
racial balance. We wholehearted-
ly believe in the neighborhood
school concept and there we take
our stand."

board asks Us
o alow conference
(Continued from Page 1) Knauss confirmed in a letter,
The Regents at their September dated October 19, that he was un-
meeting upheld the statement # able to answer's Toy's question at
that the conference must be prov- present but that it would be exam-
en educational. However, Fleming ined by the Regents in their "gen-
left the decisions to whether the eral review of recognition and use
conference could be held up to of facilities."
Vice President for Student Services The police board last night "in
Robert Knauss, subject to Re- developing a uniform policy on the
gental approval, use of University facilities" made
Knauss had agreed with the ed- clear that this proof of educa-
ucational value criteria and asked tion'al value should not be applied
the GLF and Radical Lesbians for to any organization.
their agenda to determine the edu- In other action, the board un-
cational value of the program. animously approved a measure

I

You'llnever
go wrong by
buying
art supplies
AT
FOLLETTS

I
I
i
t
I
I
i
i
s

future. His concern was that if
GLF complies, then that would set
a precedent requiring all groups
to prove educational value before
being allowed to use University
facilities for conferences.
enrollj nors
C01tsiued :roiii Page 1)
five schools in the southwestern
area. They include Western High
School, two elementary schools
and two junior high schools.
In order to work in that area'
the education school had to re-
ceive the permission of Norman'
Drachler, Superintendent of the
Detroit Public Schools.

requested to by one per cent of
the student body. Current Uni-
versity-wide regulations allow the
corporations the choice as to
whether or not they wish to come.
Also, the Board began to con-
sider a police-community relations
program plan set up by the Ann
Arbor Police. The City of Ann
SArborhas received a federal grant
to establish the program. This
would ential assigning two police
officers to campus, not involved
in normal police enforcement ac-
tivities, who would try to estab-
lish good relationships withstu-
dents in explaining police funs-
t'ons.
The OSS board 'will decide
whether or not they will co-
operate with such a measure.
Kingsley Graham, who will re-
ceive a Ph.D. degree in nuclear
engineering from the University,
has won the Mark Mills Awards of
the American Nuclear Society.
The award is for his paper
"Pulsed Moderator Studies Using
a Time-Focused Crystal Spectro-
meter," which was judged the best
original technical paper contri-
buting to the advancement of nuc-
lear science and engineering sub-
mitted by a graduate student.

Jim Toy, a member of GLF which would prohibit a corpora-
asked Knauss if the regental police tion from recruiting through the
requiring educational value would OSS Placement Services if it re-
be applied to all groups in the fuses to come to a forum when

McGovern blasts
Nixon's policies
(Continued from Page 1) Republican coffers are now full
Nixon administration for what he and those of the Democrats are
called its implication that the not."
Democrats tolerate lawlessness McGovern was twice asked to
and violence in America. defend his approval of Nixon's
"I would like to think," he said, new anti-crime bill. He explained
"that every person would do what that he had tried to exclude the
he could to reduce crime andvio- "no-knock" and "preventive de-
lence in our country. What is tention" parts of the bill, but when
wrong is the administration's at- this failed he still felt that the
titude that they have a monopoly bill "had enough good features
on concern over the subject." that it should be approved."
Commenting on recent speeches He added that he was hopeful
of Vice President Spiro Agnew, the Supreme Court would rule
McGovern said he was worried those parts unconstitutional.
about "growing Spiroism." He
likened Agnew to a puppet, with
Nixon pulling the strings. 1)
"It seems incongruous," con- o
tinued McGovern, "that a man
who began his administration with
the call of 'bring us together' hask
now adopted polarizing strategies
to 'divide and conquer.'"
McGovern said that while Ag- (otinuedfromPage3)
new has aroused reactionary Re- passing out Black Panther lit-
publicans to a "virtual frenzy," he erature.
hoped that the vice president will Police have said the youths
eventually be repulsed by the were interfering with other per-
"basic decency of the American sons. Black Panther leaders
people." claim the youth were. being har-
McGovern termed Nixon's re- rassed.
cent veto of a bill that would limit Fighting broke out between
the amount of money candidates the policemen, the two youths
can spend in their campaigns, andronlookers and policemar.
"one of a long string of bad Marshall Emerson answered 'a
vetoes." call for help. Plainclothes police-
"There is a growing bipartisan man Glenn E. Smith was shot
recognition that there should be a fatally in the head after he came
limit on skyrocketing campaign to investigate the shooting of
costs," he said. "I think the bill Emerson, who was wounded in
was vetoed primarily because the the hand.

KmymJ
MV

U'

I want to serve the country in the
best way know how"-ANDY STAPP
Andy Stapp joined the Army with the avowed purpose of
changing things radically. Out of it came constant harass-
ment, two court-martials, an undesirable discharge and the
American Servicemen's Union.
Here is Stapp's story of how the ASU was organized as he
almost single-handedly took on the biggest non-union shop
of them all - the U.S. Army.

Ge4' an t
0
checC itl
11 *)
KA

Although both Beach and Hus-
ton are not optimistic about the
program being very successful this
winter, they are confident that it
will attract more students next
fell.

i
'
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i.

Beach says that students in
program have a "full-time
signment" both in class and
of class. He conceeds that it is
an easy job but states that if
student is "dedicated" he or
could do satisfactorily.

the;
as-
out
not
the
she

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27
Trumpet Student Recital: School of
Music Radio Hall, 12:30 p.m.
Department of German Dutch Cof-
fee Hour: film on Rembrandt (English)
and Surinam Dutch Guiana (Dutch) :
3050 Frieze Bldg., 3:00 p.m.
Department of Zoology Lecture: Prof.
Carl Gans, Department of Biology,
SUNY, Buffalo, "The Evolution of Air-
breathing Mechanisms in Lower Verte-
brates": 4054 Nat. Science, 4:00 p.m.
Kelsey Museum and Department of
History of Art Lecture: Professor Oleg
Grabar, Harvard University, "Michigan
Excavations at Quasr-al-Hayr: F i f t h
Season': Auditorium B, Angell Hall, 4:10
p.m.
Departments of Physics and, Astron-
omy Lecture: G. Cohen-Tannoudji, Sac-
lay "Duality Plus Regge Cuts Imply
'Complementarity' ": P&A Colloquium
Room, 4:15 p.m.
Schools of Dentistry, Medicine a n d
Pharma *y Joint Lecture: Paul P.
Kruse, Jr., Director, Biomedical Divi-
sion, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation,
"Applications of Perfusion Culture
Method": Dental Research Tower, 6:30
p.m.

Plac eent Service
The following jobs In the Ann Arbor
area have been listed with our office
recently. Many more job openings are
listed for other parts of the "country.
Check at our office, 3200 S.A.B. for
more.
Colonial Square Cooperative, Proper-
ty manager in residence to assume com-
plete and sole responsibility for man-
agement of 500-family housing cooper-
ative. Degree not necessary, but should
have some exper. and some bookkeep-
ing ability.
Rocco's Corp. Restaurant Manager for
pizza carry-out restaurant in West-
land. Complete responsibility for per-
sonnel, advertising, etc.
Federal Mogul, two jobs for 8 months
only. Screener, metal powder process-
ing, Melter, raw metal furnace work.
High Scope Educational Research
Foundation, Key Puncher, exper. on
educ. training in keypunching.
Lafayette Clinic, Medical Lab. Tech.,
-Bachelors in Med.,. Tech., bio., chem. or
pharimacy. No 'exper. required.
Washtenaw County Residential Vo-
cationgl C rentporG,eu
cational Cente4, Group Worker, grad
level training in social group work
methods required plus exper. In lead-
ing youth groups. Familiarity with be-
havioral modification techniques pre-
ferred.
For information on any of the above
jobs call Placement Services, 763-3163.

fool,

A U S T I N
DIAMOND

"One suspects that the American
Servicemen's Union will make enor-
mous waves throughout the military
Establishment...Stapp's account of
the officers' Pig Parties at Fort Sill,
Oklahoma, is worth the price of the
book."--JoHN LEONARD,
TheNew York Times
"Stapp's account of this war against
the Brass makes inflammatory read-
ing that will enrage conservatives
who cannot share his glee at his
brass-baiting, and may shock others

with its depiction of raw anti-Com-
munist hysteria among high officers
who repeatedly put him on trial on
what he insists were trumped-up
charges." -Publishers' Weekly
"The account of Stapp's checkered
Army career is light and lively, the
Brass comes off looking incredibly
dull-witted and frighteningly auto-
cratic, and readers who support the
cause will love the story."
-The Kirkus Reviews

1209 S. University

663-7151

U Against
The amazing
story of the
fight to unionize
the United
States Army
.Brassby Andy Stapp
$1.95, paperback; $4.95, cloth " Simon and Schuster

If yOu buy your
aunt a present
from Stanger's
and she doesn't
like it,
tell her to
live with it
until she does.
Stongerf
307. Jffate
Ann Arbor ,Mchgan 48108
no 3-4514

Free delivery of submarines
to central campus area only.
Beginning NOV. 1
(Sundays only)
5-12 P.M.
(minimum order $3.00)
Ask about our 6 foot
Party Sub
V 0100

ABORTION COUNSELING, INFORMATION
AND REFERRAL SERVICES
Abortions up to 24 weeks of pregnancy are
now legal in New York State. There are no
residency restrictions at cooperating hospitals
and clinics. Only the consent of the patient
and the performing physician is required.
If you think you are pregnant, consult your
doctor. Don't delay. Early abortions are
simpler and safer.
If you need information or professionial assist-
ance, including immediate registration into
available hospitals and clinics, telephone:
THE ABORTION INFORMATION AGENCY, INC.
160 WEST 86th STREET
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10024
212 - 873-6650
8 A.M. To 10 P.M.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

ATTENTION:
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FRESHMEN & SOPHOMORES ! !
THE DEARBORN CAMPUS OF U-M
WOULD LIKE TO MEET YOU
WHEN: EACH THURSDAY WHERE: 1213 ANGELL HALL

Some really outstanding new Penguins are at your
campus bookstore now!
ANXIETY AND NEUROSIS. Charles Rycroft. A look at the
iature of anxiety and its retation to emotional disorders.
$1.25
THE MODERN CULTURE OF LATIN AMERICA. Jean
Franco. The first Lnglish-language study of the relationship
between society and the artist in Latin America. $2.95
THE ARCHITECTS OF THE PARTHENON. Rhys
Carpenter. This newest volum'e in the Architect and Society
series offers a radical re-exaination of one of the world's
most venerable structures. $2.95
THE SAILORS' RENDEZVOUS. Georges Simenon. Joins
eight other Simenon thrillers already in Penguin editions.

The most intensive studyof
the black worker in America
ever undertaken.
The complete records of the historic Fair Employ-
ment Practices Committee...now available on micro-
film.
Created to prevent discrimination in essential World War
II defense industries, the FEPC interviewed approximately
14,ooo minority-group workers. More than 80% of them
black.
The result: dramatic, original source material that will
open new doors to the teaching and study of the black man's
role in U.S. industry.
In page after page, black men and women reveal their
personal experiences with discrimination and prejudice-
both on the job and in their'daily lives. They talk about their
wages and working conditions... their unions and labor
leaders...their ideals and aspirations... their problems and

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