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October 21, 1970 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-21

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Wednesday, October 21, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven'

Wednesday, October 21, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

on this and that
Ken Brady: Pressure
on the big man
eric siegel
1 E VOICE of Michigan Coach Johnny Orr and the bouncing
of a basketball were the only noticeable sounds in Crisler
Arena Monday afternoon.
"Thatta boy, Brady . . . thatta boy, big boy. That's what I
like to see. Now get back out there and show some defense." Orr
was yelling, but it was from enthusiasm, not frustration, and
with good reason. He has a solid, if not brilliant, cast of return-
ing lettermen and a host of talented sophomores, at least two
of whom will most likely start.
And, for the first time since he ,took over as head
basketball coach here he has a big man.
The big man is, of course, Ken Brady, one of those
aforementioned talented sophomores, and he has all the
attributes it takes to be a really great player. He has
size (6-10, 235), agility, strength, speed and he can shoot,
too. He's the type of player who can muscle inside to get a
couple of tough points or a crucial rebound on offense, or
clog up the middle, intimidate enemy shooters and block
shots on defense.
He can move, as he did in Monday's drills, from one side
of the foul lane to another in a couple of steps to block a
shot, or he can go up in one motion and score with either
hand.
But, along with all the natural attribltes and ability, there
is quite a bit of pressure on Ken Brady.
"Sure, I feel the pressure," he says. "I'm the biggest one
on the team and there are a lot of people who are pointing to
me and expecting a lot out of me."
"The pressure on Brady comes from his pride," Orr says.
"He has pressure on himself to succeed, to live up to what
everyone has come to expect of him."
These is, of course, always a lot of pressure on the big
man. The shooter can be off, and hope someone can pick up
the slack, or hope that the big man can grab off the rebound
and give him another shot until he finds the range. If the
big man gets beat underneath, it's all over.
But there are even additional pressures on Brady. Unlike the
rest of Michigan's heralded sophomores, Brady never played a
' freshman game, having sat out the year on academic proba-
tion. In effect, he is making the jump from high school ball to
varsity ball. In the first three games of his college career, he
will face three of the nation's top teams in Notre Dame, Ken-
tucky and Duke.
Brady is the first to admit that playing his first college
game as a member of the varsity puts even more pressure
on him. And he also admits that there are some things he has
to work on after sitting out of organized competition for a
year.
"The main thing is picking up the fundamentals," he
says. "After you've been out a year, things don't come quite
as naturally, but after a while I hope things will start to
come back home."
Orr freely admits that he doesn't know how a year's
absence from the court will affect his big man. But, as things
stand now, he is planning to start the former Flint Central
standout at the pivot spot.
If Brady had gone to any of the other dozens of schools
that recruited him, there might be some inclination to redshirt
him and play him as a freshman this year, but the Big Ten
forbids the practice. And, as Orr says, "Even if we coulld red-
shirt him and play him as a freshman this year, we wouldn't
hold him out. We think he can play for us and help us tre-
mendously. He proved he belonged in college, and now he has
the chance to play."
Orr is planning to get a lot of mileage out of Brady,
too' as well as fellow-sophomores John Lockard, Ernie
Johnson, Henry Wilmore and Leon Roberts. Along with re-
turning lettermen Dan Fife, Wayne Grabeic, Rod Ford and
Harry Hayward, Orr is looking for more offensive balance
and better defensive play.
He is also looking for better rebounding, and he is expecting
Brady to supply a large part of the muscle on the boards. "We'll
be able to be more relaxed when we're shooting," Orr says. "The
players will be able to stay looser. They'll know that if they put
the ball up and miss, thre's a good chance we can get it back
again."
The muscle on the boards is one - although by no means
the only - reason Orr sees this year's team as "clearly the best
Michigan team since Cazzie Russell played here." r
"Sure, you think about people saying we're going to be
the best team since Cazzie," says Brady, who shares an
[ apartment with Lockard, Johnson and Wilmore. "The four
of us have talked about it informally around dinner.
"You just have to sort of smile about it and take it as
a compliment and go out there and do the best job you can."
Bowling Standings

Torrid Pistons nip Bucks

By The Associated Press
DETROIT -Bob Quick's three-
point play with five seconds left
plus a penalty shot by Jimmy
Walker on a technical foul gave
the unbeaten Detroit Pistons a
wild come-from-behind 115-114
National Basketball Association
victory over Milwaukee last night.
Lew Alcindor of the Bucks con-
nected on one of two free throws
after the final buzzer sounded.
Both shots would have tied the
score before the largest Cobo arena
crowd ever to watch a Piston game;
-11,316.
With Milwaukee ahead 113-111,
Walker stole the ball from the
Bucks with 20 seconds left before
Quick's layup and free throw.
Milwaukee then was called for
a technical foul with three seconds
remaining and Walker sank the
decisive point.
Beckman out
Michigan defensive t a c k l e
Tom Beckman left the practice
field early yesterday after suf-
fering a knee injury. The ex-
tent of the injury was not im-
mediately known.

-Associated Press
FORWARD DAVE STALLWORTH (9) of the New York Knicks
leaps towards the basket in an attempt to get a jump shot away,
but is fouled on the play by Los Angeles' Keith Erickson (20). The
Knicks won the contest 115-100.

VERSATILE SPEEDSTER
Soph sparks Husker attack

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:.
BOB ANDREWS
Lakers knicked
NEW YORK-Willis Reed re-
covered from a brief upset stom-
ach to score 16 points in the final
quarter as the New York Knicks
pulled away from Los Angeles
115-100 last night in a National
Basketball Association game.
Reed's first two points of the
final period capped a string of
eight straight New York points
that broke an 84-84 tie and left
Los Angeles behind to stay in the
first meeting between the clubs
since the Knicks beat the Lakers
for the NBA title last spring.
The big New York center fin-
ished with 29 points and Walt
Frazier chipped in with 23. Jerry
West had 26 and Wilt Chamber-
lain 20 for the Lakers, who played
without injured Elgin Baylor.
Bulletin
NEW YORK (A") - Danny
Murtaugh was named today the
Associated Press' National
League Manager of 1970, a year
in which his low-key leadership
and uncanny juggling of a
patchwork pitching staff guided
Pittsburgh to the NL East title.
It was the third Manager of
the Year Award for the Penn-
sylvania Irishman who has
never managed any big league
club except Pittsburgh. He won
in 1958, his first full season as
manager, and in the Pirates'
world championship year of
1960.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

NBA
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L Pct. GB
Philadelphia 4 0 1.000 -
New York 3 1 .750 1
Buffalo 1 2 .333 2!/
Boston 1 3 .250 3
Central Division
Baltimore 2 1 .667 -
Atlanta 0 1 .000 1!4
Cincinnati 0 2 .000 2
Cleveland 0 3 .000 2%
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Detroit 4 0 1.000 -
Milwaukee 1 1 .500 2
Phoenix 1 1 .500 2
Chicago. 2 2 .500 2
Pacific Division
San Francisco 2 1 .667 -
Portland 1 1 .500 1/
Seattle 1 1 .500 'l2
Los Angeles 1 2 .333 1
San Diego 1 3 .250 1j
Yesterday's Results
San Francisco 125, Baltimore 105
Detroit 115, Milwaukee 114
New York 115, Los Angeles 100
Philadelphia 98, Buffalo 89
Cleveland at Portland, inc.
Phoenix at San Diego, inc.
Only games scheduled
Today's Games
Detroit at Boston

Baltimore at Cincinnati
Los Angeles at Philadelphia
San Francisco at Atlanta
Phoenix at Seattle
Only games scheduled
ABA
Yesterday's Results
New York 108, Memphis 103
Floridians 120, Kentucky 115
NHL
East Division
W L T Pts.
Boston 4 0 0 8
Montreal 4 1 0 8
New York 3 1 0 6
Detroit 2 4 0 4
Buffalo 1. 3 1 3
Toronto 1 3 0 2
Vancouver 1 5 0 2
West Division
Chicago 3 1 1 7
Philadelphia 3 1 1 7
St. Louis 3 1 1 7
Los Angeles 2.1 0 4
Minnesota 2 2 0 4
Pittsburgh 0 2 2 2
California 0 4 0 0
Yesterday's Results
California at Vancouver, Inc.
Only game scheduled
Today's Games
Toronto at New York
Minnesota at Montreal
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles
St. Louis at California

Professional League Standings

Paid Political Advertisement
SENATOR
GEORGE McGOVERN
Hill Auditorium
Sunday-October 25, 1970
4:00 P.M.

GF GA
25 12
15 7
11 5
16 20
4 12
14 19
16 29
19 12
19 9
1e 12
14 10
9 a
4 7
6 21

By KEN COHN
The Big Eight has been known
for years for its balanced corn-
petition and high quality of play,
and this year, true to form, the
league powers have been knocking
each other off with regularity.
Yet, only a few weeks into con-
ference play, the clear favorite to
take the championship is that,
well-known team from Lincoln,
Nebraska. Just last Saturday, the
Cornhuskers rolled up their big-
gest score of the season, trounc-
ing Kansas, 41-20.
Having a 2-0 Big Eight record
so far, with the only blemish on
their six-game slate a tie with
Southern Cal. the fourth-ranked
Huskers are clearly the team to
beat.
Nebraska's lack of a superstar,
the ubiquitous "Heisman trophy
candidate," merely points out the
Huskers' varied and balanced at-
tack. They have averaged over 230
yards per game on the ground
and 170 yards through the air.
They have scored over 34 points
a game, while giving up less than
12. Not spectacular figures, but
good enough to give the Black
Shirts an undefeated 12ecord and
cause many to compare this year's
team to those of the glory years
of the mid-'60's.
The Huskers' field general this
weekend against Oklahoma StateI
will be Van Brownson, a junior
who took over from Jerry Tagge
and starred against Kansas, ac-x
counting for four TD's. Joe Or-
duna and Jeff Kinney have spark-
ed Nebraska's ground game, with
nearly 900 yards between them,
while split end Guy Ingles pre-
sents, with one other man, an
ever-present pass threat.
That man, who exemplifies the
versatility of the Cornhuskers, yet
possesses the speed, moves, andj
determination that perhaps mark!
him in the future as one of those
For the student body:
Genuine
Authentic
Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizies 34 to 46

"superstars," is sophomore John-
ny Rodgers,
His natural position on ,he team
is in the backfield slot, but he does
most of his work elsewhere on the
field. He's a new-breed triple-
threat man-a runner, pass re-
ceiver, and member of the "sui-
cide squad"-those who run back
punts and kickoffs, and are
matched in potential excitement
by few other players.
Rodgers leads the Huskers in
runbacks with over 400 total yards
and in pass receiving with 18
snares for over 300 yards, and has
another 160 yards rushing.
And in the all-important cate-
gory - scoring - the small (5-10,
171 pounds) but speedy Nebraskan
is by far the team leader with
seven TD's.
Commenting on Nebraska's suc-
cess, Rodgers cited the team's all-
around balance and depth. "Even
if a starter isn't effective, we're
fortunate enough to almost always
have someone else whocan come
in and get the job done."
"We've got the teamwork that
is necessary for a winner. Since
the thrust of our offense is blast-

line and the runners have to help
each other-and theydo. In ad-
dition, Coach Devaney stresses
our independence-few plays are
called in from the bench."
Rodgers is not unaware of the
importance of Devaney to the
Huskers' past and present winning
habits. "He's a father figure to us,
more understanding than most
coaches, and ready to talk about
our problems." In a contrasting
situation such as that at Syra-
cuse University, he continued,
"The coach is at fault if he fails
to understand the players' prob-
lems, since they're the ones he
brought to his school to play. Yet,
since the biggest thing on a team
is togetherness, if the protesting
players aren't interested in work-
ing for the team, they might as
well not play at all."
.And Johnny Rodgers knows he
is not exempt from the challenge
presented by such intra-fraternal
clashes. "As a black, I have to;
work for everything a little harder
than a white man does-that's a
disadvantage. But at the same
time, -I know I have to work that
much harder to succeed - and
that'. an r~vnntap 11

General
Admission
$1.50

Tickets
on Sole
in
Fishbowl
and
Union Lobby

RAMSEY CLARK
Rackham Auditorium
Friday-October 30, 1970
*8:00 P.M
Tickets for Clark Will Not Be Sold at Door

111 U p lltC 1111U.n, LI..Us&±1f51V U{ 6 an. ad van .. age.
Now Appearing Monday through Saturday
STAN MITCHELL
AND THE
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Enjoy FINE FOOD at
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Open
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Sat. & Sun.
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Buy two Van Heusen 417 Body Shirts. One
for you to wear. Another for you to share
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ALSO CLOTHES FOR BIG AND TALL MEN

BOWLING LEAGUE
TUESDAY NIGHT LEAGUE
Wv
'eam a 7

3.
4.
5.
6.

L
5

1.
2.
3.
4.
5,
s.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Ti

Team 6
Team 3
Whoopers
Cream II
Team 2

7 5
6 6,
5 7
5 3
2 6

Bad Guys 11 9
Team 1 8 12
Grass, inc.6 14
Lollipops 6 14
GUYS HIGH GAME
David Jones-194 (Targets)
GUYS HIGH SERIES
Dick Crawley-515 (Team 1)
GALS HIGH GAME
Cindy Smith-190 (Pinheads)
GALS HIGH SERIES
Cindy Smith 497 (Pinheads)

I

HIGH GAME
Jeff Fox-223
HIGH SERIES
Jeff Fox-646
ALL CAMPUS LEAGUE
W
John F. Ivory 19
Optimists 13
Cachusifucan 13
Black Ballers 10
Century Club 10
Team Ten 10
Chokers 8
Weasels 7
Dieldrin 7
Lost Cause 3
HIGH GAME
Marc Etheridge-225
HIGH SERIES
Marc Etheridge-618
GUYS-GALS LEAGUE
W

L
1
7
7
10
10
10
12
13
13
17

State Stre

etMATE
et at L iberty

L

2. Pinheads 14 6Bi
Allende's Chile: A Third Alternative?
Implications of a Marxist, Anti-imperialist, and
non-totalitarian, democratically elected government
in Latin America
A PANEL DISCUSSION WITH
JOSE M. INSULZA, Chile ENRIQUE SALGADO, Mexico

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