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October 18, 1970 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-18

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Page Two,_

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 18, 1,970 1I

PageTwoTHEMICIGANDAIY Snda, Ocobe 18 190__

Ei.

Doctor Ross:
A very juicy man

By BERT STRATTON
There's an old book, about
tenth grade, now lost I think,
called How to Play Blues Har-
monica and it's by Tony Glover
(of Koerner, Glover, and Ray)
which importantly has a pic-
ture of Dr. Isaiah Ross in it -
which happens to be the same
picture as the one the Students
for Auto Workers used to ad-
vertise Dr. Ross' concert.
The picture being a straight-
on shot of a man with a blues
harp to his lips and a guitar
in his lap-no extraordinary big
deal, right? So I forgot about it,
} and then the Doctor shows up
last night right here and of
course, like all lost apples, he
comes chewing his sweet guitar
chords right back into my mem-
-a ' ory, a very juicy man, like he
is obviously folky-and I don't
t> want to get bogged down in a
mire of what's real quicksand
and what isn't, what's real
folky and who's puttin' on.
Cause look, "Buddies in the
4. . Saddle" (the lead act last night)
didn't claim to be hicks, and
they weren't, but they talked
like hicks and sang country
music and were as appreciated
-Dairy-Terry McCarthy as any round and delicious ap-
dance
Ballet: A new, youthful light'

ples, not at all sour, like you
sometimes get around white col-
lege towns.
Needless to say, the Doctor
didn't worry too much about
the color of his vest, an old
Rock hang-up. He's a medium-
sized, corny, hick blackman
(said and done) and he's a good
harp player. He's very heavy,
like he probably eats some GM
(where he works) steel for
breakfast, cause all his boogie-
bass lines sink in the listener's
(mine) stomach, and they just
sit there, and I ain't about to
digest no pig-iron bars for a
late Saturday night snack-so
you see he's very heavy, down-
home, kind of makes you loaded
(the feeling of liquor or a
smooth ride in Olds '98 with the
tape deck playing).
Which we could call a lulling
effect-and we don't even un-
derstand Dr. Ross' accent when
he takes the mike between runes
-like when Ray Charles came
over on the tape deck yesterday
afternoon, the deck was over-
heated, screwed-up, and bingo,
the Great Ray sounded sour and
off the beat.
Absurd to be sure, but the
driver (I was hitching) was also
a blackman who also works at
GM (Lansing) and I under-
stood his talk (since you see
he wasn't as nervous as Dr.
Ross). They get $40 a week while
on strike, and no telling, the
strike may go to the first of
the year-and the driver says
that food stamps aren't worth
the problem-wait eight hours
in line to get twelve dollars
worth of free food a month.
Now that's the blues. Dr.
Ross is the blues, and those
blue lights which they dim in
the Ballroom are just right,
arent's they, Doctor? Which, to
mention it, those lights shined
(last night) on many curly

THE ACADEMY
AWARD WINNER!
"BESTJPICTURE
Ike whole
world lov~es
EASTMANCOLOR
A UNITED ARTISTS-LOPERT RELEASE
TONITE-LAST NITE
NEWMAN CENTER
7:00 & 9:30 P.M.
Admission 90c

A

-Daily-Terry Mccarthy

heads, most of them feeiing a
little giddeup, cause what's to
pay two dollars and not be en-
tertained.
Justice was served. Ya, "Bud-
dies in the Saddle" were fine,
kind of night time country
music-not to be confused with
the country-urban sound they
sometimes play-that's how I
heard it described by somebody
seated in back of me, strictly
a floorboard (sprawling) crowd,
so you can guess that we wer-
en't about to not like "Buddies"
-it was to be a goodtime eve-
ning and of course they're as {
much urban-country as the nextf
band, smart-ass New Yorkers
(maybe) singing Buck Owens,
Carl Perkins, and whonot.
I believe the "Buddies" and
everybody else and Dr. Ross (al-
though his world is not ours,
like the poo: blackman, is a
darker blue than you), but any-
how, we all left with a good,
sweet aftertaste.,I

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The peop le
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STARTS THURSDAY
"SOLDIER BLUE"
"significant . . . liberating"
-N. Y. Times

I

Join The Daily
Sports Staff

By DIANE ELLIOT
In the past few years a bevy
of young regional ballet com-
panies have appeared across the
nation. Aimed at bringing bal-
let to a greater cross-section of
the American theatre-going
public, these companies also
provide a showcase for talented
young dancers and choreograph-
ers. The Pennsylvania Ballet, in
last night's performance at
Hill Aud., reflected both the
strengths and the failings which
often typify these small low-
budget companies.
The program was spotty. Each
of the four offerings presented
some satisfying and even some
delightful moments-some ex-
ecuted solo variations, lovely
lifts, brilliant ensemble work.
The company boasts a group of
fresh young women with solid
technique, and or two more than
competent soloists. However,
much of the choreography per-
formed last night did not show
the company to advantage; per-
haps the company's choreo-
graphers are hampered by the
all too apparent lack of out-
standing male dancers to match
and partner the women.
Ballade, with its four couples
caught in a blue-lit dream of
romantic pursuit, served as a
rather bland curtain raiser.
Intended, perhaps, as a lyrical
dream-dance in the vein of
Robbins' Dances at a Gather-
ing, the piece instead comes off
as a rather saccharine and lan-,
guld game of coy courtesans.
Despite garishly colored cos-
tumes and unsubtle lighting,
Fugitive Visions contained some
nice ensemble sections; interest-
ing in its manipulations of

groups in space, the piece pre-
sented the attempts of young
people to hang on to a remem-
bered carefree gaiety in the face
of impending doom. While the
treatment of this theme was
somewhat shallow, the dance
ended with a vivid and powerful
image of shaken, fearful chil-
dren clinging to each other for
comfort. A short duet, Trio, also
More Arts coverage on Page 6
had its nice moments. The open-
ing image of the girl balancing
precariously upon her pointes
in a diagonal beam of light
captured well the blind uncer-
tain groping of lonely youth.
These three pieces represent-
ed choreographic efforts by
members of the company itself.
While adequately executed, they
appeared rather studied efforts
to create in a variety of styles.
Design and composition were
muddy, costumes and lightning
effects father crude. George
Balanchine's Pas de Dix pointed
up by contrast the choreo-
graphic clarity and brio is miss-
ing from the works of the com-

pany members and its resident
choreographer, Job. Sanders.
In Pas de Dix we saw some of
the vivid, spatial design, the
brio, pace and build in which
ballet lovers delight. However,
the company lacked confidence
in this face-paced demanding
choreography. Here, especially,
the lack of men with brilliant
technique was painfully evident.
Only the soloist, Alba Calzada,
seemed equal to Balanchine.
Despite its obvious shortcom-
ings, the Pennsylvania Ballet,
along with others of its ilk,
must not be written off as an-
other second rate regional com-
pany. In offering the works of
young unknown choreographers,
as well as of established names
like Balanchine, this company
serves the vital function of ex-
perimental laboratory and train-
ing ground in the dance world.
If we do not attempt to judge
its work by the same rigorous
standards applied to big name
companies, we can nevertheless
appreciate the work of these
young artists, working toward
their own standard of excellence
and the building of its own re-
pertoire.

t

"IT MUST BE SEEN!"

-Detroit News

FILET-1.59

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"A SHOCKER! FASCINATING!"
- New York Daily News
>y THS 13 THE DAWNNG OF THE AGE OF
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A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR"PANAVISION"

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for dinner this Sunday
Spcaghetti

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