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October 16, 1970 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-16

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Friday, October 16, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, October 16, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Birds
BALTIMORE (R) -- T h e
awesome Baltimore Orioles
won their second World Series
in five years yesterday, beat-
ing a steady tatoo of hits
against a disintegrating Cin-
cinnati pitching staff while
lefthander Mike Cuellar stif-!
led the Reds' bats in a 9-3
fifth game victory.
The triumph, built on Cuel-
lar's shutout pitching after a
shaky first inning and under-
scored by a final fieldingf
flourish by Series hero Brooks
Robinson, gave the Orioles
four victories to one for the!
Reds in the best-of-seven set.3
"I'm the happiest I've ever!
bean," said Robinson in t h e
champagne-splashed d r e s s i n g1
room "Nothing will ever replace1
the first one. But it does make up
for everything last year."
LAST YEAR was totally dif-
ferent for the Orioles. They losti
to the New York Mets and Brooks
went 1-for-19. But a look at Cin-
cinnati pitching changed that.
eYou can't win with only two
regular pitchers," acknowlded'

win

daoly'
sports

NIGHT EDITOR:
ELLIOT LEGOW

-Associated Press
BALTIMORE ORIOLE'S BOOG POWELL barrels into home on Merv Rettenmund's single with the
Bird's fifth run in World Series action yesterday. Baltimore went on to score four more as they
demolished the Reds, 9-3, and captured the Series in five games.

'THIS GAME CAN MAKE THE SEASON'

Pl~aye r
By TERRI FOUCHEY takes.7
The sixty-third renewal of the any th
contest to settle the question of perfect
who's best in the state occurs Sa- BILL
turday. This is how some of the clippin
combatants look at it. from a
HENRY HILL: "I'd like to beat shows
them this year not only becauseMSU
of the rivalry, but because I like right)',
to win all our games, Every year thinkir
you want to try and beat those thankc
you beat last year and even more
so those who beat you." in thek
DON MOORHEAD: "It's some- FRA
thing we really want, so emotion factor
will play a big part in it. We to be5
want to win as revenge for last 'big inc
year and to continue this year's so far
goals of being unbeaten and a yards i
conference, championship." gained
BILLY TAYLOR (B.T.): "Sure, that.aiN
it's a big rival game, but we just th.
have to look at it like any other hit us
game, so we can play our game. hit us
* If everybody's putting out and do- gets m
ing their best, then we'll find out selves
who's better by what happens on, we ha
the field." every s
REGGIE MCKENZIE: "There's MIK
a lot of incentive for me in the lots of
Michigan-Michigan State angle gest ga
because I'm from Michigan and I staying
grew up knowing about the rival- in the
ry. Also, it's a really important someth
game for me because my high :aught
school coach went to State. We're only fo
thinking about revenge for last goals,k
year, but we have to play for this Michig
year. So we have to go out there MAR'
and mean business, because they matter
do," want t
ED MOORE: "I find that the importa
attitude is like the way we look- does a
ed at Ohio State. Sophomore year venge i
they beat us-really bad and every- FRIT
body remembered. For Michigan most in
State, last year is in the back of spendr
our minds, and we try to keep it tration
there and don't say much about but th
it but just remember and play making
with that as incentive." MIK
BO RATHER: "Winning every win all
game is important, but there are with a
certain games that are more so, ---
that can make the season. Mich-
igan State is like this. We can go
9-1, but if the loss is this game,
the season isn't complete. No mat-
ter what happens, we'll always re-
member this game. I think the
outcome depends entirely on mis-

view
They aren't going to make
is week, so we have to be
LY HARRIS: "There's a
g up in the lockerroom
Lima, Ohio newspaper that{
their predictions and it says
by 11 points (you read it
, that's been helping to get
ne up. I find that I'm
ng about it more intensely
other games. It's definitely
back of my mind.
NK GUSICH: "The revenge
and the fact that I want
5-0 after Saturday are my
centives. In the four games
we've only allowed 2 9 2
rushing, and last year MSU
348 yards on the ground
t us and nobody else did
Naturally we respect them
at. Everyone said they out-
and that strikes home and
e up. We keep telling our-
that we can't fold and that
ve to think positively in
ense."
(E KELLER: "There are J
reasons why it's the big-
ame of the year. Last year,
unbeaten, being the best
state, also the fact that it's
ling the whole campus gets
up with. Winning is not
r ourselves, for the team's
but it's for everybody ' at
an."
TY HUFF: "It doesn't
what team it is, we just
o win. Every game is most
ant. The fact of last year
dd incentive, though. Re-
s a big thing."
TZ SEYFERTH: "It's a
'mportant game. We always
practices stressing concen-
execution on every play,
is week we're working on
sure everything's perfect."
E TAYLOR: "You want to
your games, but especially
team that beat you lastI

JIS U
year. Emotion is a very big factor
in this game, just the fact that,
I go to Michigan, that's why Ij
want to win."
GUY MURDOCK: "It'll prob-
ably be our toughest game so far
this season. We have to be emo-
tionally high for, it and the re-I
venge factor will have something
to do with this.
MIKE OLDHAM: "The attitude}
reminds me of the Ohio State
game last year. We're just going
out and Rhustling and doing our
best at practice. Like Bo says, 'If
you do it like you should at prac-
tice, that's the way you're going
to do it during the game.' That's
what we've been working for and
that's what we hope happens."
BRUCE ELLIOTT: "It's a game
we've got to be ready for mentally.
It'll be a knock-down. drag-out
fight, but if we play like we can,
we have a chance to win."
NHL Standings'
NHL
East Division
3 W L T Pts. GF GA

Pete Rose, the plucky Cincinnati
right fielder. "Not enough."
Agreed, said Cincinnati manag-
er Sparky Anderson, adding:
r Sure we used 18 pitchers. But
I've got to do what the scoreboard
shows. They just kept hitting us."
THE ORIOLES started doing
that in Cincinnati Saturday and
finished in Baltimore Thursday,
atoning for their loss to the Mets
last year and earning a minimum
$15,000-a-man prize with an of-
fensive outburst that included
home runs by Frank Robinson and
Merv Rettenmund in a display
that put the Baltimore sluggers in
the record book.
The day dawned dreary and
Chiefs trade
Mike Garrett
KANSAS CITY (AP-The Kan-
sas City Chiefs peddled Mike Gar-
rett to the San Diego Chargers
yesterday and Coach Hank Stram
of the Chiefs wished the star run-
ning back "front page success"
with his new team.
In return, the Chiefs got a 1971
second round draft choice.
Stram issued a three-point state-
ment detailing his reasons for
trading Garrett, a former Heis-
man Trophy winner from South-
ern California, in his fifth pro
season.
Stram noted that Garrett has
said this will be his last year in
pro football and that next spring
the player plans to seek a major
league baseball career.
Garrett had said several months
ago that "win, lose or draw, this
is my last season in pro football."
Stram said the Chiefs', "run-
ning backs have developed to
the point where they will give us
the continued efficiency and con-
sistency that we are seeking.
"We are fortunate to have both
quality and depth at the running
back position in the persons of
Warren McVea, Wendell Hayes,
Bobby Holmes and Ed Podolak."

drizzly as rain pelted Memorial
Stadium, but it stopped before
game time, the skies lightened for
45,341 fans and the day brighten-
ed for 25 Orioles as they brought
Manager Earl Weaver his f i r s t
world title.
And despite Cuellar's effective
pitching and the home runs by
Frank Robinson and Rettenmund
that gave the star-studded Balti-
more club a five-game record
total of 10, this was a day when
they all shared center stage.
EVERY BATTER in the lineup,
except Cuellar, stroked at least
one hit in theassault against six
Cincinnati pitchers. And Brooks
Robinson, unquestionably the out-
standing player in the series, add-
ed to his total with his ninth hit.
But Brooks was only a minor
part of the fifth game's story as
the Orioles brought the American
League World Series triumph No.
40 in the 67-year history of the
baseball classic.
The biggest share of the glory
had to be assigned to Cuellar, the
24-game winner who should have
been unsettled by a three-run
first-inning explosion by the Reds,
but then pulled himself together
and fashioned a six-hitter,
The 5-foot-11, 175-pound veter-
an, who started his career with
Cincinnati in 1959, allowed only
two harmless singles after that
and joined the other two mem-
bers of the Orioles' big three-Jim
Palmer and Dave McNally - as
winners in the series. Tom Phoe-
bus got the other victory.
While Cuellar steadied himself,
the rest of the Orioles did the
same, richocheting hits all over
the damp stadium for two runs in
each of the first three innings to
put it away.
Center fielder Paul Blair, who
stroked three singles and matched
Brook Robinson's nine-hit total
for the Series, got the Orioles
started in their half of the first
inning when he stroked a hit with
one out against Cincinnati starter
Jim Merritt.
Merritt worked the count to
3-2 and then Frank swung, loft-
ing the pitch halfway up the left

World
field bleachers for his secondr.
homer of the series. In the sec- _ s
ond inning, the Orioles chased
Merritt and pulled ahead to stay.
DAVE JOHNSON walked with
one out, Andy Etchebarren sine
gled and, when Cuellar hit a
sharp liner to right that Pete
Rose caught, Anderson yanked
Merritt. Wayne Granger, slugged
for a grand slam homer by pitcher
Dave McNally in the third game,
came on-and found the going
just as rough this time.
Mark Belanger and Blair fol-
lowed with consecutive singles,
each drving in a run and putting
Baltimore in front 4-3.
Granger would be gone in the
third. And Anderson would call
on Milt Wilcox, Tony Cloninger,
Ray Washburn and Clay Carroll
in an attempt to stop the big,
bad Birds, but nothing could do
it.
The Reds, who had battled back
from elimination with a 6-5 vic-
tory built on Lee May'sathree-run
homer Wednesday, just were un-
able to find the guy who could
stop the booming Baltimore bats.
Boog Powell, the hulking first
baseman, led off the Baltimore
third with a double on one hop
to the bullpen fence in right-cen-
ter and Merv Rettenmund imme-
diately drove him in with a single.
Rettenmund eventually scored on
a single by Johnson.

RETTENMUND lengthened the
lead to 7-3 in the fifth inning,..
when he tagged a 3-2 pitch from -
Cloninger into the right field
bleachers for his homer.
Then, in the eighth, the Orioles
added further embarrassment by
collecting their final two runs on
three hits. Singles by Blair and
Frank Robinson opened the in-
ning. Powell's hot smash brought
Blair home, and Johnson singled
Frank Robinson home.
That took it into the ninth and,
as Cuellar strode to the mound,
the appreciative crowd cheered
loudly. But the loudest cheer
arose when Brooks Robinson put
the finishing flourish on his bril-
liant one-man performance with
another exceptional fielding play,
spearing a hot liner from Johnny
Bench in foul territory for the
first out.
The crowd roared again as May
fanned for the second out and
r e a c h e d a final ear - splitting'
crescendo as pinch hitter Pat Cor-
rales bounced a grounder to
Brooks Robinson for the final out.
The Baltimore bench emptied
onto the field to embrace each
other. -

-Associated Press
Orioles celebrate victory

Series

,t

CHRISTIAN
MORALITY:

.:a
r

ABSOLUTE
or RELATIVE
Dr. Arthur Geisler, 7:30 Tonile
Trinity Seminary, Union Rm. 3"G

Montreal 3 2 0 6
Boston 2 9 0 4
NewYork 1 1 0 2
Buffalo 1 2 9 2
Toronto 1 1 0 2
Detroit 1 3 0 2
Vancouver 1 4 0 2
West Division
Chicago 3 0 0 6
St. Louis 2 1 0 4
Philadelphia 2 1 9 4
Los Angeles . 1 1 0 2
Minnesota 1 1 0 2
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 0
Oakland e 92 0
Yesterday's Results
Montreal 3, Buffalo 0
Chicago 2, Detroit 1
Philadelphia 5, Vancouver 4
Minnesota 4, Pittsburgh 2
Only games scheduled
Today's Games
Boston at Oakland

9
15
4
h
10
12
13
15
10
8
8
5
3
4

4
8
3
8
16
23
4
9
7
9
4
6
10

HO1

ECO

I

G

'70

4I

PRESENTS:

Yesterday's Basketball Results
NBA,.
Boston at Phoenix, inc.

THURS., OCT. 2
STEVE
MILLER
BAND
and
BREAD
TICKET PRICES:
THURS. NIGHT-

DO
IT!
DO
IT!
DO
IT !

SATOCT. 24
TEN WHEEL
DRIVE
with GENYA RAVAN
(San Francisco jazz-rock group)
and
SHA-NA-NA
(from Woodstock)
Excellent Seats
Are Still Ava lable

PELLIAS SET

Antique
accents
In carved,
traditional and geometric
patterns. Designed as
only A rtCarved can ...
to say love in many

*

im

i

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