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October 16, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-16

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 10, 1970, r l

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, October 16, 1970

. I -

Tue kv'4 i'
U-M ? MSU ? WHATEVER THE SCORE
CELEBRATE WITH US
VICTORY DRINK: HARVEY WALLBANGER
Open from 11 A.M.-2 P.M. 2 miles from
4 P.M.-10 P.M. NORTH CAMPUS
NO 8-9387 5400 PLYMOUTH RD.
Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixboro)

Gridde Pickings
CHAPTER NINE
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. The arb was
cancelled as the UGLI melted. Stockwell led a panty-raid on West
Quad, while the national guard snickered.
CHAPTER TEN
Another spectre haunts Ann Arbor while the cube in front of the
administration building ominously and slowly topples.
CHAPTER ELEVEN
"Call me Ishmael, or pay me $5, or get those gridde pickings into
the Daily by midnight, Friday.
CHAPTER TWELVE
The wart throbbed. Growing deeper and darker with every stom-
ach-turning pulsation. Hotter and harder, almost frenzied it beat on
Quick! The disinfectant inundated the moldy wart, but not before
Brian Zemach of WCBN could pick his griddes.

Rankings

By ELLIOT LEGOW
"Being number one is a nice
honor, it's the kind of thing that's
discussed all over the country. But
the polls aren't a guiding factor
in our football program; the polls
don't bother us.'
Thus, Texas football coach Dar-
rell Royal attempts to picture
himself as unconcerned about the
national college football rankings.
But can the coach of a team
which was ranked number one last
year and is fighting for the top
spot again this season really take
a neutral view of the polls?
Not Royal. He is concerned
enough about his teams ranking
to make allegations of geograph-
ical bias and voting prejudice in
the workings of t h e Associated
Press Top 20 poll.
"There's more population in the
north and east so there are more
votes from there." And, he adds,
"votes are prejudiced," for local
teams.
The result, Royal feels, is that
if "any Big Ten team goes unde-

feated, they'll outpoll any t
our section. The same g
Notre Dame."
Woody Hayes' Ohio Stat
is leading in all the polls n
the Longhorns did captur
number one ranking last
and even received a plaqu
President Nixon to attest1
fact.
But, true to Royal's as
the Longhorns couldn't outl
Buckeyes until Michigan
off its "upset of the decad
vember 22.
And, despite a victory i
Cotton Bowl o v e r Notre
the nation's longest w i n
which currently stands at
a squad almost identical
year's, the Longhorns ha
to settle for the runner-u
tion in the polls.
But ranking second isn't
disgrace for the Longhorns
hasn't found the going es:
rough so far this y e a r
against UCLA. In fact, Ro
mits, "we lost that game."

1. Michigan State at MICHIGANM
(pick score)
2. Indiana at ILLINOIS
3. PURDUE at Iowa
4. Minnesota at OHIO STATE
5. Northwestern at WISCONSIN
6. NOTRE DAME at Missouri
7. Alabama at TENNESSEE
8. GEORGIA TECH at Auburn
9. William and Mary at VMI
10. Oklahoma at COLORADO
11. RUTGERS at Delaware

12. ARMY at Virginia
13. DUKE at North Carolina State
14. New Mexico State at NEW
MEXICO
15. Texas-El Paso at COLORADO
STATE
16. UCLA at California
17. Columbia at YALE
18. Oregon State at HOUSTON
19. Vanderbilt at GEORGIA
20. MIDDLE TENNESSEE at
Murray State

rankle
team in Well, almost lost; Trailing 17-
oes for 13 with less than two minutes re-
maining, the win streak appeared
e team to be broken.
ow, but Although the Longhorns regain-
re t h e ed possession near midfield, Royal
season, remained worried. "With our type
te from of offense, we don't have a good
to that two-minute attack. It's not our
nature to strike long and quick."
sertion, But when they had to, the Long-
poll the horns could strike long and quick.
pulled
e," No- With only 12 seconds remain-
ing, quarterback Eddie Phillips
in t he hit star end Cotton Speyer on a
Dame, 45 yard scoring bomb to save the
streak game and the win streak.
24, and To Royal, the most important
to last aspect of the victory over UCLA,
ve had though, was the performance of
p posi- Phillips.
"Phillips needed to win one like
a total that," Royal said of his junior
. Texas quarterback.
pecept Moving into the role vacated
yal ad- by controversial James Street,
Phillips has been successful in
moving the team and running the
ball, but the passing game has
been erratic. ,
T h e Longhorns' wishbone-T
backfield stresses running, par-
ticularly a running quarterback,
and Phillips has fit the bill by
rushing for over 350 yards in his
first four games. This total ex-
season, cedes the figures for both Bert-
ng and lesen and Steve Worster in the
ith the Longhorns' tauted running backs.
lor, an The running attack is differ-
"Now entiated, with each Worster, Phil-
go and lips, and Bertelsen averaging 15
w good carries per game. All three a r e
averaging over five yards per carry
s about and keying on any one has not
aboau proved to be a successful defense.
proving The offense relies a great deal
Michi- on the pitchout. The quarterback
t black rolls to one side and will always
n. We be followed by a trailing back. He
as held has three options: to run, pass, or
because pitch out.
in edu- Giving the ground game sound
actice." blocking is a strong offensive line

Loyal
led by All-American tackle Bobby
Wuensch and guards Mike Dean,
Phillips takes to the air only
about 12 times a game and he has
averaged less than 100 yards per
game. He has had Speyer, a very
agile receiver, to grab his tosses
and keep the defense looking for
the bomb.
However, the all-American end
broke his arm in last week's
game against Oklahoma, and will
be lost for the season.
Speyrer's loss is certain to hurt
the Texas offense but the ground
game should still be able to carry
the team, at least until the con-
frontation with Arkansas.
Royal fears Arkansas, because
he sees the Hogs as similar to
UCLA in several ways. Arkansas
relies on passing, and it is the
passing of Dennis Dummit of
UCLA that almost defeated the
Longhorns.
The Texas defensive line is very
tough and has allowed only 150
yards per game on the ground.
Only Oklahoma using the wish-
bone-T themselves last week, has
been able to run against the Long-
horn defense.
Thedpass defense is not quite so
solid and was riddled by Dummit
for 340 yards. Arkansas' Bill
Montgomery is another good quar-
terback and could give the Texas
pass defense more problems.
The Uclans also showed that it
is possible to defense Texas. They
keyed on the running game and
managed to hold Phillips to only
35 yards in 23 carries.
Until their meeting with Arkan-
sas, Texas has no rough competi-
tion on tap. So once again the
Longhorns' hopes for a SWC
championship and the number one
ranking depend on their success
against the Razorbacks in Austin.
And to Darrell Royal who does-
n't care about the polls, "it doesn't
matter who's there (number one)
now, just who's there when the
season is over."

*1

EmowmMomm"

I

The Populist Party, Citizens United for the Vote at 18,
and the Ann Arbor Area Club of the New Democratic Coalition

PLAYS TOUGH
Hard work lifts Taylor to to

present
JACKIE VAUGHN III
along with
DON KOSTER and MIKE STILLWAGON
and a ROCK BAND

FRIDAY, October 16
8 P.M.

Michigan Union
Ballroom

FEATURING SPEECHES AND QUESTIONS ON

* THE DRAFT
" THE WAR

" THE 18-YEAR OLD VOTE
" AMNESTY, etc.

By ANDRE HUNT
Do it, do it, do it until it's done,
that's the thought that's going
through Mike Taylor's mind when
he takes the field at his lineback-
ing position.
"I take on a different personal-
ity" says Taylor. "When I get out
on the field, I've only got one
thing on my mind, getting the
job done."
Taylor has been "doing it" on
defense simce he was a prep All-
City at Martin Luther King in De-
troit, where he was defensive end
and offensive tackle. He- played
opposite Michigan's agile middle
guard, Henry Hill who was then
on offensive end.
"Football is a tough game" Tay-
lor explained. "It takes a tough
individual to play it. The person
who hits hardest and continues to
hit hard will come out on top."
Taylor didn't get his chance to
start until last year's Michigan
State game, but because of his
consistently fine play, he has
started every game since. "Our
defensive team is like a baby
steadily growing, steadily progress-
ing and by the Ohio State game,

and rock music
SUGGESTED DONATION $1
JACKIE VAUGHN III is a black State Representative from Detroit, and spon-
sor of a package of youth oriented bills as well as the Michigan version of
the Massachusetts Peace Bill.
DON KOSTER, author of the controversial amnesty resolution passed by the
Democratic State Convention, is a candidate for State Representative from
Ann Arbor.
MIKE STILLWAGON is a candidate for Congress from Michigan's Second
District, opposed to the war and calling for re-ordered national priorities.

there's no telling how good we will
be," Mike states.
"Ohio State is just like any
other team" he says. "But it's hard
to beat a team that doesn't make
mistakes. Ohio State is not phys-
ically overpowering, they're just
a precision football team."
Although he has played defense
in high school and in college, the
change from high school to col-
lege wasn't all that easy. "Playing
defense in college is a lot harder,"
Mike says. "In high school you
could hit, hard, be aggressive and
you got by. In-college, the passing
game is a lot better and the de-
fensive play is more refined."
Another problem in college is
dissappointed fans. "Booing both-
ers you but you learn to get over
it. Fans don't know what's going
on. If they did they wouldn't boo."
Taylor also sees a difference
in the coaching. "My high school
coach was a total opposite of
Coach Schembechler. , Coach
Schembechler yells, screams and
calls you names, but the only time
my high school coach yelled was
when you made a big mistake.
"Coach Schembechler judges
you on talent alone. As long as you
produce you play. He's a fine guy,
but a hard coach who wants per-
fection."
When asked about the best
players he has faced Mike said,
"Mike Phipps of Purdue was a
real class quarterback. He could
pick you apart if you gave him
a chance to."
"I never thought about making
All-American or All-Big Ten"
says Taylor. "Most of that stuff
is a bunch of politics. "In t h e
pros they look at how you play,
not what you made. Look at Lem
Barney. Until he came to the
pros nobody had ever heard of
him."
"Our offense was a little behind

at the beginning of this
but offense is precision timi
getting used to playing w
guy next to you," says Tay
important cog in the fourth
ed defense in the nation.
the offense has started toI
there's no telling just ho'
our team can be.
Although Mike is seriou
football, he's also serious a
other things such as imp
the position of blacks at
gan. "The B.A.M. strike pu
athletes in a bad situatio
were for the strike, but it wi
during spring practice and 1
football is our means to a
cation, we had to attend pr

p1

AIM FOR TOP:

Cagers open fall drills

$399 CAN GET YOU $500 WORTH OF

By AL SHACKELFORD
"We're going to shoot for the
Big Ten title right from the be-
ginning," said Michigan basket-
ball coach John Orr yesterday as
practice for Michigan's 1970-71
basketball season officially got
underway.
Orr emphasized that Michigan's
basketball success "largely de-
pends on our start," during which
the Blue will battle three of the
nation's top teams: Notre Dame,
Kentucky and Duke.
Most of yesterday's practice was
taken up with the mechanics of
Picture Day, as all the Wolverine
maplemen gritted their teeth and
action-posed for the clicking cam-
era.
Orr named team captain Dan
Fife as the only definite starter
so far, saying that for the first
time in his four years at Michi-

1. KLH 27

KLH'

Equipment!
At KLH
we believe that music given a proper
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gan, "we've really had tremendous
competition for the positions.".
An educated guess as to t h e
1970-71 starting lineup for t h e
Wolverines would p u t Fife and
Wayne Grabiec in the backcourt,
Ken Brady in the pivot, and Hen-
ry Wilmore and Rod F o r d up
front.
Orr calls Wilmore "one of the
ten top sophs in the country" and
adds, "We're counting heavily on
our sophomores this y e a r, and
feel they should be ready to go
right off the bat."
Returning varsity members this
year are Fife, Ford, Grabiec, Matt
Anderson, Dave Hart, Harry Hay-
ward, Tim Nicksic and Rufus
Woods.
Invited out to practice f r o m
last year's tremendous frosh squad
were Wilmore, Brady, Ernie John-
son, John Lockard, Steve Bazelon,
Greg Buss, Greg Lowery, Tim
Megge, Larry Rea, Bob Rhodin
and Leon Roberts.
"We haven't decided anything

definite yet about the size of this
year's squad," commented Orr.
"We have no intentiqn of cutting
anyone unless we feel he can't
help us at all."
The varsity squad has tradition-
ally been cut to 12.
The fast-break style of basket-
ball which Michigan played with
(and lost) last year will be dump-
ed in favor of a more deliberate
style, according to Orr.
"We don't plan to run so much,"
said the Blue mentor. "We won't
score so many points, but I know
our defense will be a lot better."
Michigan fans will s e e their
Wolverines use almost every type
of defense in the book from "zone
press to regular man-to-man.
The Wolverines will open this
year at home December 1 against
powerful Notre Dame, and then
hit the road for back-to-back
toughies against Kentucky a n d
Duke. Then it will be back home
again for a relative breather
against cross-town rival Eastern
Michigan.

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20% OFF LIST ON NEW BOOKS
50% OFF LIST ON USED BOOKS
STARTS MONDAY, OCTOBER 12

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A pair of KLH
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Phone 764-0558

3. THE KLH CHANGERS

But a Volkswagen is an imported car.
Isn't it?,
Sure it is. Just like coffee is an imported drink.
So it's'no surprise to find 3w million Volkswagens
buzzing around the States.
Isn't that odd for a funny-looking car with a
funny-sounding name?
No. Not when you know how we take care of
them and sell them.
To begin with, service always came before
sales with us. It still does.
We've always worked every bit as hard to im-
prove VW service as we have to improve the
VW itself.
So when you bring your VW in for service,
drive up to the front door, please.
You can sit in our spic-and-span waiting rooms,
have a cup of imported coffee and not walk out
broken in mind, spirit and checkbook.
One big reason for this is that while we always
make VWs better and better, we don't always
make them differenter and differenter.
So those 3 millionVWs have a lot in common:
most VW parts still fit most VWs.
It is actually easier (and cheaper) to get parts
for a Volkswagen than for many domestic cars

SALE
Children's Costumes
on all new costumes

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